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Pisum sativum 'Caselode' Plant Care Reminders

Caselode garden pea

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General Information

  • Instruction By Julie Bawden-Davis
    Notes Prolific shelling pea. Like all peas, it grows best in the cool, humid conditions of late fall through early spring.
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Plant Care Instruction

  • Scroll down or click on any month for plant care instructions
    • January
    • February
    • March
    • April
    • September
    • October
    • November
    • December
    January
    1. Buy

    Buy plants in the nursery when available. Buy seed when available via mail-order.
    2. Plant

    Plant in a full-sun location in rich, well-draining soil that is slightly acid to slightly alkaline. If organic matter is low, work in 2 to 4 inches of homemade or bagged compost. Plant 4 inches apart with 4 feet between rows to allow sufficient room for growth.
    3. Sow Seeds

    Soak seeds overnight before sowing. Plant in light, well-draining soil that is slightly acid to slightly neutral. Plant seed 1/2-inch deep, 2 to 4 inches apart in the ground. Seed can also be planted in containers for later transplant. Keep soil moist but not soggy during germination.
    4. Fertilize

    If not done the prior month, fertilize when the plant begins to flower with a balanced fertilizer designed for vegetable crops. Avoid overfeeding, as excessive nitrogen leads to foliage but no flowers.
    5. Water

    Keep soil surrounding plants moist but not soggy. If soil is moist and Santa Ana winds blow, mist foliage to keep plants from drying out.
    6. Pest/Disease Inspection

    Check for signs of aphids and powdery mildew.
    7. Treat for Pest/Disease

    Treat aphids by rinsing plants with a strong spray of water--repeating once a day until they are gone. If aphids persist, treat with insecticidal soap. For powdery mildew treatment, remove and dispose of affected leaves and prevent further infestation by spraying remaining foliage with horticultural oil, neem oil or a biological fungicide.
    8. Transplant

    Transplant plants seeded in containers to a full-sun location in rich, well-draining soil that is slightly acid to slightly alkaline. If organic matter is low, work in 2 to 4 inches of homemade or bagged compost. Plant 4 inches apart with 4 feet between rows to allow sufficient room for growth.
    9. Harvest

    Most peas are ready to harvest 55 to 70 days after seeding. Start harvesting when the peas have swelled to almost a round shape and are bright green in color. Harvest regularly, as peas allowed to over-ripen on the vine will cause the plant to stop producing.
    10. Special requirements

    As a vining type, plant requires trellising.
    February
    1. Buy

    Buy plants in the nursery when available. Buy seed when available via mail-order.
    2. Plant

    Plant in a full-sun location in rich, well-draining soil that is slightly acid to slightly alkaline. If organic matter is low, work in 2 to 4 inches of homemade or bagged compost. Plant 4 inches apart with 4 feet between rows to allow sufficient room for growth.
    3. Sow Seeds

    Soak seeds overnight before sowing. Plant in light, well-draining soil that is slightly acid to slightly neutral. Plant seed 1/2-inch deep, 2 to 4 inches apart in the ground. Seed can also be planted in containers for later transplant. Keep soil moist but not soggy during germination.
    4. Fertilize

    If not done the prior month, fertilize when the plant begins to flower with a balanced fertilizer designed for vegetable crops. Avoid overfeeding, as excessive nitrogen leads to foliage but no flowers.
    5. Water

    Keep soil surrounding plants moist but not soggy. If soil is moist and Santa Ana winds blow, mist foliage to keep plants from drying out.
    6. Pest/Disease Inspection

    Check for signs of aphids and powdery mildew.
    7. Treat for Pest/Disease

    Treat aphids by rinsing plants with a strong spray of water--repeating once a day until they are gone. If aphids persist, treat with insecticidal soap. For powdery mildew treatment, remove and dispose of affected leaves and prevent further infestation by spraying remaining foliage with horticultural oil, neem oil or a biological fungicide.
    8. Transplant

    Transplant plants seeded in containers to a full-sun location in rich, well-draining soil that is slightly acid to slightly alkaline. If organic matter is low, work in 2 to 4 inches of homemade or bagged compost. Plant 4 inches apart with 4 feet between rows to allow sufficient room for growth.
    9. Harvest

    Most peas are ready to harvest 55 to 70 days after seeding. Start harvesting when the peas have swelled to almost a round shape and are bright green in color. Harvest regularly, as peas allowed to over-ripen on the vine will cause the plant to stop producing.
    10. Special requirements

    As a vining type, plant requires trellising.
    March
    1. Water

    Keep soil surrounding plants moist but not soggy. If soil is moist and Santa Ana winds blow, mist foliage to keep plants from drying out.
    2. Mulch

    Mulch with a 1-inch layer of shredded bark to keep soil cool and moist.
    3. Pest/Disease Inspection

    Check for signs of aphids and powdery mildew.
    4. Treat for Pest/Disease

    Treat aphids by rinsing plants with a strong spray of water--repeating once a day until they are gone. If aphids persist, treat with insecticidal soap. For powdery mildew treatment, remove and dispose of affected leaves and prevent further infestation by spraying remaining foliage with horticultural oil, neem oil or a biological fungicide.
    5. Transplant

    Transplant plants seeded in containers to a full-sun location in rich, well-draining soil that is slightly acid to slightly alkaline. If organic matter is low, work in 2 to 4 inches of homemade or bagged compost. Plant 4 inches apart with 4 feet between rows to allow sufficient room for growth.
    6. Harvest

    Most peas are ready to harvest 55 to 70 days after seeding. Start harvesting when the peas have swelled to almost a round shape and are bright green in color. Harvest regularly, as peas allowed to over-ripen on the vine will cause the plant to stop producing.
    7. Special requirements

    As a vining type, plant requires trellising.
    April
    1. Water

    Keep soil surrounding plants moist but not soggy. If soil is moist and Santa Ana winds blow, mist foliage to keep plants from drying out.
    2. Mulch

    Mulch with a 1-inch layer of shredded bark to keep soil cool and moist.
    3. Pest/Disease Inspection

    Check for signs of aphids and powdery mildew.
    4. Treat for Pest/Disease

    Treat aphids by rinsing plants with a strong spray of water--repeating once a day until they are gone. If aphids persist, treat with insecticidal soap. For powdery mildew treatment, remove and dispose of affected leaves and prevent further infestation by spraying remaining foliage with horticultural oil, neem oil or a biological fungicide.
    5. Harvest

    Most peas are ready to harvest 55 to 70 days after seeding. Start harvesting when the peas have swelled to almost a round shape and are bright green in color. Harvest regularly, as peas allowed to over-ripen on the vine will cause the plant to stop producing.
    6. Special requirements

    As a vining type, plant requires trellising.
    September
    1. Sow Seeds

    Soak seeds overnight before sowing. Plant in light, well-draining soil that is slightly acid to slightly neutral. Plant seed 1/2-inch deep, 2 to 4 inches apart in the ground. Seed can also be planted in containers for later transplant. Keep soil moist but not soggy during germination.
    October
    1. Sow Seeds

    Soak seeds overnight before sowing. Plant in light, well-draining soil that is slightly acid to slightly neutral. Plant seed 1/2-inch deep, 2 to 4 inches apart in the ground. Seed can also be planted in containers for later transplant. Keep soil moist but not soggy during germination.
    November
    1. Buy

    Buy plants in the nursery when available. Buy seed when available via mail-order.
    2. Plant

    Plant in a full-sun location in rich, well-draining soil that is slightly acid to slightly alkaline. If organic matter is low, work in 2 to 4 inches of homemade or bagged compost. Plant 4 inches apart with 4 feet between rows to allow sufficient room for growth.
    3. Sow Seeds

    Soak seeds overnight before sowing. Plant in light, well-draining soil that is slightly acid to slightly neutral. Plant seed 1/2-inch deep, 2 to 4 inches apart in the ground. Seed can also be planted in containers for later transplant. Keep soil moist but not soggy during germination.
    4. Water

    Keep soil surrounding plants moist but not soggy. If soil is moist and Santa Ana winds blow, mist foliage to keep plants from drying out.
    5. Pest/Disease Inspection

    Check for signs of aphids and powdery mildew.
    6. Special requirements

    As a vining type, plant requires trellising.
    December
    1. Buy

    Buy plants in the nursery when available. Buy seed when available via mail-order.
    2. Plant

    Plant in a full-sun location in rich, well-draining soil that is slightly acid to slightly alkaline. If organic matter is low, work in 2 to 4 inches of homemade or bagged compost. Plant 4 inches apart with 4 feet between rows to allow sufficient room for growth.
    3. Sow Seeds

    Soak seeds overnight before sowing. Plant in light, well-draining soil that is slightly acid to slightly neutral. Plant seed 1/2-inch deep, 2 to 4 inches apart in the ground. Seed can also be planted in containers for later transplant. Keep soil moist but not soggy during germination.
    4. Fertilize

    When the plant begins to flower, fertilize with a balanced fertilizer designed for vegetable crops.
    5. Water

    Keep soil surrounding plants moist but not soggy. If soil is moist and Santa Ana winds blow, mist foliage to keep plants from drying out.
    6. Pest/Disease Inspection

    Check for signs of aphids and powdery mildew.
    7. Treat for Pest/Disease

    Treat aphids by rinsing plants with a strong spray of water--repeating once a day until they are gone. If aphids persist, treat with insecticidal soap. For powdery mildew treatment, remove and dispose of affected leaves and prevent further infestation by spraying remaining foliage with horticultural oil, neem oil or a biological fungicide.
    8. Transplant

    Transplant plants seeded in containers to a full-sun location in rich, well-draining soil that is slightly acid to slightly alkaline. If organic matter is low, work in 2 to 4 inches of homemade or bagged compost. Plant 4 inches apart with 4 feet between rows to allow sufficient room for growth.
    9. Harvest

    Most peas are ready to harvest 55 to 70 days after seeding. Start harvesting when the peas have swelled to almost a round shape and are bright green in color. Harvest regularly, as peas allowed to over-ripen on the vine will cause the plant to stop producing.
    10. Special requirements

    As a vining type, plant requires trellising.
  • Buy

    When's the best time to buy this plant? When can you buy these from seed (if you can)? When is it usually available? What are things to look for when you're buying it? Or anything other tidbit of information you can share!

    January

    Buy plants in the nursery when available. Buy seed when available via mail-order.

    February

    Buy plants in the nursery when available. Buy seed when available via mail-order.

    November

    Buy plants in the nursery when available. Buy seed when available via mail-order.

    December

    Buy plants in the nursery when available. Buy seed when available via mail-order.

    Plant

    When's a good time to plant this plant or bulb? Any special planting instructions?

    January

    Plant in a full-sun location in rich, well-draining soil that is slightly acid to slightly alkaline. If organic matter is low, work in 2 to 4 inches of homemade or bagged compost. Plant 4 inches apart with 4 feet between rows to allow sufficient room for growth.

    February

    Plant in a full-sun location in rich, well-draining soil that is slightly acid to slightly alkaline. If organic matter is low, work in 2 to 4 inches of homemade or bagged compost. Plant 4 inches apart with 4 feet between rows to allow sufficient room for growth.

    November

    Plant in a full-sun location in rich, well-draining soil that is slightly acid to slightly alkaline. If organic matter is low, work in 2 to 4 inches of homemade or bagged compost. Plant 4 inches apart with 4 feet between rows to allow sufficient room for growth.

    December

    Plant in a full-sun location in rich, well-draining soil that is slightly acid to slightly alkaline. If organic matter is low, work in 2 to 4 inches of homemade or bagged compost. Plant 4 inches apart with 4 feet between rows to allow sufficient room for growth.

    Sow Seeds

    When can you plant these seeds? When's the best time? Can you start them indoors and move them out? Do they have any special requirements?

    January

    Soak seeds overnight before sowing. Plant in light, well-draining soil that is slightly acid to slightly neutral. Plant seed 1/2-inch deep, 2 to 4 inches apart in the ground. Seed can also be planted in containers for later transplant. Keep soil moist but not soggy during germination.

    February

    Soak seeds overnight before sowing. Plant in light, well-draining soil that is slightly acid to slightly neutral. Plant seed 1/2-inch deep, 2 to 4 inches apart in the ground. Seed can also be planted in containers for later transplant. Keep soil moist but not soggy during germination.

    September

    Soak seeds overnight before sowing. Plant in light, well-draining soil that is slightly acid to slightly neutral. Plant seed 1/2-inch deep, 2 to 4 inches apart in the ground. Seed can also be planted in containers for later transplant. Keep soil moist but not soggy during germination.

    October

    Soak seeds overnight before sowing. Plant in light, well-draining soil that is slightly acid to slightly neutral. Plant seed 1/2-inch deep, 2 to 4 inches apart in the ground. Seed can also be planted in containers for later transplant. Keep soil moist but not soggy during germination.

    November

    Soak seeds overnight before sowing. Plant in light, well-draining soil that is slightly acid to slightly neutral. Plant seed 1/2-inch deep, 2 to 4 inches apart in the ground. Seed can also be planted in containers for later transplant. Keep soil moist but not soggy during germination.

    December

    Soak seeds overnight before sowing. Plant in light, well-draining soil that is slightly acid to slightly neutral. Plant seed 1/2-inch deep, 2 to 4 inches apart in the ground. Seed can also be planted in containers for later transplant. Keep soil moist but not soggy during germination.

    Fertilize

    When should you fertilize this plant? Which kind of fertilizer do you recommend? Should you use different fertilizers at different times of year?

    January

    If not done the prior month, fertilize when the plant begins to flower with a balanced fertilizer designed for vegetable crops. Avoid overfeeding, as excessive nitrogen leads to foliage but no flowers.

    February

    If not done the prior month, fertilize when the plant begins to flower with a balanced fertilizer designed for vegetable crops. Avoid overfeeding, as excessive nitrogen leads to foliage but no flowers.

    December

    When the plant begins to flower, fertilize with a balanced fertilizer designed for vegetable crops.

    Water

    Is there a time to reduce or increase watering? Any special requirements? Things to avoid during certain times of the year?

    January

    Keep soil surrounding plants moist but not soggy. If soil is moist and Santa Ana winds blow, mist foliage to keep plants from drying out.

    February

    Keep soil surrounding plants moist but not soggy. If soil is moist and Santa Ana winds blow, mist foliage to keep plants from drying out.

    March

    Keep soil surrounding plants moist but not soggy. If soil is moist and Santa Ana winds blow, mist foliage to keep plants from drying out.

    April

    Keep soil surrounding plants moist but not soggy. If soil is moist and Santa Ana winds blow, mist foliage to keep plants from drying out.

    November

    Keep soil surrounding plants moist but not soggy. If soil is moist and Santa Ana winds blow, mist foliage to keep plants from drying out.

    December

    Keep soil surrounding plants moist but not soggy. If soil is moist and Santa Ana winds blow, mist foliage to keep plants from drying out.

    Mulch

    Does this plant need to be mulched? Are there specific types of Mulch which are better for this plant? How much?

    March

    Mulch with a 1-inch layer of shredded bark to keep soil cool and moist.

    April

    Mulch with a 1-inch layer of shredded bark to keep soil cool and moist.

    Pest/Disease Inspection

    What are the common problems this plant will face and when should you look for them to appear?

    January

    Check for signs of aphids and powdery mildew.

    February

    Check for signs of aphids and powdery mildew.

    March

    Check for signs of aphids and powdery mildew.

    April

    Check for signs of aphids and powdery mildew.

    November

    Check for signs of aphids and powdery mildew.

    December

    Check for signs of aphids and powdery mildew.

    Treat for Pest/Disease

    How do you treat the common problems for this plant? What products or concoctions or natural means do you use? Any special requirements?

    January

    Treat aphids by rinsing plants with a strong spray of water--repeating once a day until they are gone. If aphids persist, treat with insecticidal soap. For powdery mildew treatment, remove and dispose of affected leaves and prevent further infestation by spraying remaining foliage with horticultural oil, neem oil or a biological fungicide.

    February

    Treat aphids by rinsing plants with a strong spray of water--repeating once a day until they are gone. If aphids persist, treat with insecticidal soap. For powdery mildew treatment, remove and dispose of affected leaves and prevent further infestation by spraying remaining foliage with horticultural oil, neem oil or a biological fungicide.

    March

    Treat aphids by rinsing plants with a strong spray of water--repeating once a day until they are gone. If aphids persist, treat with insecticidal soap. For powdery mildew treatment, remove and dispose of affected leaves and prevent further infestation by spraying remaining foliage with horticultural oil, neem oil or a biological fungicide.

    April

    Treat aphids by rinsing plants with a strong spray of water--repeating once a day until they are gone. If aphids persist, treat with insecticidal soap. For powdery mildew treatment, remove and dispose of affected leaves and prevent further infestation by spraying remaining foliage with horticultural oil, neem oil or a biological fungicide.

    December

    Treat aphids by rinsing plants with a strong spray of water--repeating once a day until they are gone. If aphids persist, treat with insecticidal soap. For powdery mildew treatment, remove and dispose of affected leaves and prevent further infestation by spraying remaining foliage with horticultural oil, neem oil or a biological fungicide.

    Transplant

    When's the best time to dig up and transplant this from one spot to another? (This is different than planting). Any special requirements?

    January

    Transplant plants seeded in containers to a full-sun location in rich, well-draining soil that is slightly acid to slightly alkaline. If organic matter is low, work in 2 to 4 inches of homemade or bagged compost. Plant 4 inches apart with 4 feet between rows to allow sufficient room for growth.

    February

    Transplant plants seeded in containers to a full-sun location in rich, well-draining soil that is slightly acid to slightly alkaline. If organic matter is low, work in 2 to 4 inches of homemade or bagged compost. Plant 4 inches apart with 4 feet between rows to allow sufficient room for growth.

    March

    Transplant plants seeded in containers to a full-sun location in rich, well-draining soil that is slightly acid to slightly alkaline. If organic matter is low, work in 2 to 4 inches of homemade or bagged compost. Plant 4 inches apart with 4 feet between rows to allow sufficient room for growth.

    December

    Transplant plants seeded in containers to a full-sun location in rich, well-draining soil that is slightly acid to slightly alkaline. If organic matter is low, work in 2 to 4 inches of homemade or bagged compost. Plant 4 inches apart with 4 feet between rows to allow sufficient room for growth.

    Harvest

    When's a good time to harvest this plant? What's the best way to harvest? Are there special requirements or features?

    January

    Most peas are ready to harvest 55 to 70 days after seeding. Start harvesting when the peas have swelled to almost a round shape and are bright green in color. Harvest regularly, as peas allowed to over-ripen on the vine will cause the plant to stop producing.

    February

    Most peas are ready to harvest 55 to 70 days after seeding. Start harvesting when the peas have swelled to almost a round shape and are bright green in color. Harvest regularly, as peas allowed to over-ripen on the vine will cause the plant to stop producing.

    March

    Most peas are ready to harvest 55 to 70 days after seeding. Start harvesting when the peas have swelled to almost a round shape and are bright green in color. Harvest regularly, as peas allowed to over-ripen on the vine will cause the plant to stop producing.

    April

    Most peas are ready to harvest 55 to 70 days after seeding. Start harvesting when the peas have swelled to almost a round shape and are bright green in color. Harvest regularly, as peas allowed to over-ripen on the vine will cause the plant to stop producing.

    December

    Most peas are ready to harvest 55 to 70 days after seeding. Start harvesting when the peas have swelled to almost a round shape and are bright green in color. Harvest regularly, as peas allowed to over-ripen on the vine will cause the plant to stop producing.

    Special requirements

    Any other requirement for this plant? Is there anything that doesn't fit into the other care categories?

    January

    As a vining type, plant requires trellising.

    February

    As a vining type, plant requires trellising.

    March

    As a vining type, plant requires trellising.

    April

    As a vining type, plant requires trellising.

    November

    As a vining type, plant requires trellising.

    December

    As a vining type, plant requires trellising.

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