46161943c67a199317f74aab6ebcd6d1

Members can create lists of plants to manage your garden, get plant care information sent to you, and connect to other gardeners. It's free and easy, SIGN IN or JOIN NOW and get started right away!

Click This Button To Use These Plant Care Reminders

Go to your My Plant Care page to see what you should be doing in your garden this month!

General Information

Plant Care Instructions By Julie Bawden-Davis

This genus consists of 10 species of deciduous, vigorous, climbing vines, many of which grow to be very large. The plants climb 25 to 50 feet and are known for their large, pendulous, highly fragrant flower clusters. Blooms appear in spring, and flower colors include white, pink, lilac, blue-purple and purple. Species most commonly grown in the home garden are the Chinese wisteria (W. sinensis) and the Japanese wisteria (W. floribunda).

Is Indoor Plant?

No

These month by month plant care tasks are for plants in the following zones :
Sunset Zones : 22, 23, 24
USDA Zones : 10a, 10b
Web Link - For more information

Plant Care Instruction

  • Scroll down or click on any month for plant care instructions
    • January
    • February
    • March
    • April
    • May
    • June
    • July
    • August
    • September
    • October
    • November
    • December
    January
    1. Buy

    Buy wisteria bareroot when available in the nursery or via mail-order. Cutting grown or grafted plants are best, as seedlings may not bloom for many years.
    2. Special requirements

    Mature vines are very heavy, especially when in bloom. Provide the plant with a sturdy structure on which to grow, such as an arbor, gazebo, fence or patio roof. It is best to not let vines grow into trees or other vegetation, as some species can damage or even kill other plants.
    February
    1. Buy

    Buy wisteria bareroot when available in the nursery or via mail-order. Cutting grown or grafted plants are best, as seedlings may not bloom for many years.
    2. Special requirements

    Mature vines are very heavy, especially when in bloom. Provide the plant with a sturdy structure on which to grow, such as an arbor, gazebo, fence or patio roof. It is best to not let vines grow into trees or other vegetation, as some species can damage or even kill other plants.
    March
    1. Buy

    Buy wisteria bareroot when available in the nursery or via mail-order. Cutting grown or grafted plants are best, as seedlings may not bloom for many years.
    2. Plant

    Plant in a full-sun location with excellent drainage. An area that gets less than 6 hours of sun a day will lead to poor or no flowering. When growing as a vine, choose an area where the plant will have room to roam. Plant with the graft union an inch or two above ground. To grow in a container, choose a pot that is at least 20-gallons, and plant high-quality potting soil.
    3. Pest/Disease Inspection

    Check for signs of iron chlorosis, characterized by yellowing leaves and green leaf veins.
    4. Treat for Pest/Disease

    Spray foliage with chelated iron to correct chlorosis. Since chlorosis occurs in alkaline soil, for a long-term solution amend with soil sulfur, which will acidify the soil.
    5. Special requirements

    Mature vines are very heavy, especially when in bloom. Provide the plant with a sturdy structure on which to grow, such as an arbor, gazebo, fence or patio roof. It is best to not let vines grow into trees or other vegetation, as some species can damage or even kill other plants.
    April
    1. Buy

    Buy wisteria plants when available in the nursery or via mail-order. Cutting grown or grafted plants are best, as seedlings may not bloom for many years.
    2. Plant

    Plant in a full-sun location with excellent drainage. An area that gets less than 6 hours of sun a day will lead to poor or no flowering. When growing as a vine, choose an area where the plant will have room to roam. Plant with the graft union an inch or two above ground. To grow in a container, choose a pot that is at least 20-gallons, and plant high-quality potting soil.
    3. Fertilize

    Feed once with a high-nitrogen fertilizer, such as a 16-16-16, to promote growth.
    4. Water

    Keep newly planted wisteria moist but not soggy while it becomes established. Once plant is actively growing, water in-ground plants once a week and containerized plants three to five times a week, depending on the weather.
    5. Prune

    Prune to control size and shape. Allow newly planted wisteria to grow and then prune to the shape you want. Remove stems as needed so that the plant grows as you desire.To train wisteria into a tree or shrub, buy one that has been trained in that manner, or remove all but one main stem and stake the plant. When it reaches the desired height, pinch the plant to force branching and rub off buds that form below that point. Prune established plants every spring or summer after blooming.
    6. Mulch

    Maintain a 2-inch layer of shredded bark at the base of the plant to retain moisture.
    7. Pest/Disease Inspection

    Check for signs of iron chlorosis, characterized by yellowing leaves and green leaf veins.
    8. Treat for Pest/Disease

    Spray foliage with chelated iron to correct chlorosis. Since chlorosis occurs in alkaline soil, for a long-term solution amend with soil sulfur, which will acidify the soil.
    9. Special requirements

    Mature vines are very heavy, especially when in bloom. Provide the plant with a sturdy structure on which to grow, such as an arbor, gazebo, fence or patio roof. It is best to not let vines grow into trees or other vegetation, as some species can damage or even kill other plants.
    May
    1. Buy

    Buy wisteria plants when available in the nursery or via mail-order. Cutting grown or grafted plants are best, as seedlings may not bloom for many years.
    2. Plant

    Plant in a full-sun location with excellent drainage. An area that gets less than 6 hours of sun a day will lead to poor or no flowering. When growing as a vine, choose an area where the plant will have room to roam. Plant with the graft union an inch or two above ground. To grow in a container, choose a pot that is at least 20-gallons, and plant high-quality potting soil.
    3. Fertilize

    If not done last month, feed once with a high-nitrogen fertilizer, such as a 16-16-16, to promote growth.
    4. Water

    Keep newly planted wisteria moist but not soggy while it becomes established. Once plant is actively growing, water in-ground plants once a week and containerized plants three to five times a week, depending on the weather.
    5. Prune

    Prune to control size and shape. Allow newly planted wisteria to grow and then prune to the shape you want. Remove stems as needed so that the plant grows as you desire.To train wisteria into a tree or shrub, buy one that has been trained in that manner, or remove all but one main stem and stake the plant. When it reaches the desired height, pinch the plant to force branching and rub off buds that form below that point. Prune established plants every spring or summer after blooming.
    6. Mulch

    Maintain a 2-inch layer of shredded bark at the base of the plant to retain moisture.
    7. Pest/Disease Inspection

    Check for signs of iron chlorosis, characterized by yellowing leaves and green leaf veins.
    8. Treat for Pest/Disease

    Spray foliage with chelated iron to correct chlorosis. Since chlorosis occurs in alkaline soil, for a long-term solution amend with soil sulfur, which will acidify the soil.
    9. Special requirements

    Mature vines are very heavy, especially when in bloom. Provide the plant with a sturdy structure on which to grow, such as an arbor, gazebo, fence or patio roof. It is best to not let vines grow into trees or other vegetation, as some species can damage or even kill other plants.
    June
    1. Buy

    Buy wisteria plants when available in the nursery or via mail-order. Cutting grown or grafted plants are best, as seedlings may not bloom for many years.
    2. Plant

    Plant in a full-sun location with excellent drainage. An area that gets less than 6 hours of sun a day will lead to poor or no flowering. When growing as a vine, choose an area where the plant will have room to roam. Plant with the graft union an inch or two above ground. To grow in a container, choose a pot that is at least 20-gallons, and plant high-quality potting soil.
    3. Water

    Keep newly planted wisteria moist but not soggy while it becomes established. Once plant is actively growing, water in-ground plants once a week and containerized plants three to five times a week, depending on the weather.
    4. Prune

    Prune to control size and shape. Allow newly planted wisteria to grow and then prune to the shape you want. Remove stems as needed so that the plant grows as you desire.To train wisteria into a tree or shrub, buy one that has been trained in that manner, or remove all but one main stem and stake the plant. When it reaches the desired height, pinch the plant to force branching and rub off buds that form below that point. Prune established plants every spring or summer after blooming.
    5. Mulch

    Maintain a 2-inch layer of shredded bark at the base of the plant to retain moisture.
    6. Pest/Disease Inspection

    Check for signs of iron chlorosis, characterized by yellowing leaves and green leaf veins.
    7. Treat for Pest/Disease

    Spray foliage with chelated iron to correct chlorosis. Since chlorosis occurs in alkaline soil, for a long-term solution amend with soil sulfur, which will acidify the soil.
    8. Special requirements

    Mature vines are very heavy, especially when in bloom. Provide the plant with a sturdy structure on which to grow, such as an arbor, gazebo, fence or patio roof. It is best to not let vines grow into trees or other vegetation, as some species can damage or even kill other plants.
    July
    1. Fertilize

    Feed once with a high-nitrogen fertilizer, such as a 16-16-16, to promote growth.
    2. Water

    Water in-ground plants twice a week and containerized plants five to seven times a week, depending on the weather.
    3. Prune

    Prune to control size and shape. Allow newly planted wisteria to grow and then prune to the shape you want. Remove stems as needed so that the plant grows as you desire.To train wisteria into a tree or shrub, buy one that has been trained in that manner, or remove all but one main stem and stake the plant. When it reaches the desired height, pinch the plant to force branching and rub off buds that form below that point. Prune established plants every spring or summer after blooming.
    4. Mulch

    Maintain a 2-inch layer of shredded bark at the base of the plant to retain moisture.
    5. Pest/Disease Inspection

    Check for signs of iron chlorosis, characterized by yellowing leaves and green leaf veins.
    6. Treat for Pest/Disease

    Spray foliage with chelated iron to correct chlorosis. Since chlorosis occurs in alkaline soil, for a long-term solution amend with soil sulfur, which will acidify the soil.
    7. Special requirements

    Mature vines are very heavy, especially when in bloom. Provide the plant with a sturdy structure on which to grow, such as an arbor, gazebo, fence or patio roof. It is best to not let vines grow into trees or other vegetation, as some species can damage or even kill other plants.
    August
    1. Fertilize

    If not done last month, feed once with a high-nitrogen fertilizer, such as a 16-16-16, to promote growth.
    2. Water

    Water in-ground plants twice a week and containerized plants five to seven times a week, depending on the weather.
    3. Mulch

    Maintain a 2-inch layer of shredded bark at the base of the plant to retain moisture.
    4. Pest/Disease Inspection

    Check for signs of iron chlorosis, characterized by yellowing leaves and green leaf veins.
    5. Treat for Pest/Disease

    Spray foliage with chelated iron to correct chlorosis. Since chlorosis occurs in alkaline soil, for a long-term solution amend with soil sulfur, which will acidify the soil.
    6. Special requirements

    Mature vines are very heavy, especially when in bloom. Provide the plant with a sturdy structure on which to grow, such as an arbor, gazebo, fence or patio roof. It is best to not let vines grow into trees or other vegetation, as some species can damage or even kill other plants.
    September
    1. Water

    Water in-ground plants twice a week and containerized plants five to seven times a week, depending on the weather.
    2. Mulch

    Maintain a 2-inch layer of shredded bark at the base of the plant to retain moisture.
    3. Pest/Disease Inspection

    Check for signs of iron chlorosis, characterized by yellowing leaves and green leaf veins.
    4. Treat for Pest/Disease

    Spray foliage with chelated iron to correct chlorosis. Since chlorosis occurs in alkaline soil, for a long-term solution amend with soil sulfur, which will acidify the soil.
    5. Special requirements

    Mature vines are very heavy, especially when in bloom. Provide the plant with a sturdy structure on which to grow, such as an arbor, gazebo, fence or patio roof. It is best to not let vines grow into trees or other vegetation, as some species can damage or even kill other plants.
    October
    1. Fertilize

    Encourage strong root growth and flowering next year by feeding once with a fertilizer higher in phosphorus and potassium, such as a 5-20-10.
    2. Water

    Water in-ground plants once a week and containerized plants three to five times a week, depending on the weather.
    3. Mulch

    Maintain a 2-inch layer of shredded bark at the base of the plant to retain moisture.
    4. Pest/Disease Inspection

    Check for signs of iron chlorosis, characterized by yellowing leaves and green leaf veins.
    5. Treat for Pest/Disease

    Spray foliage with chelated iron to correct chlorosis. Since chlorosis occurs in alkaline soil, for a long-term solution amend with soil sulfur, which will acidify the soil.
    6. Special requirements

    Mature vines are very heavy, especially when in bloom. Provide the plant with a sturdy structure on which to grow, such as an arbor, gazebo, fence or patio roof. It is best to not let vines grow into trees or other vegetation, as some species can damage or even kill other plants.
    November
    1. Fertilize

    If not done last month, encourage strong root growth and flowering next year by feeding once with a fertilizer higher in phosphorus and potassium, such as a 5-20-10.
    2. Special requirements

    Mature vines are very heavy, especially when in bloom. Provide the plant with a sturdy structure on which to grow, such as an arbor, gazebo, fence or patio roof. It is best to not let vines grow into trees or other vegetation, as some species can damage or even kill other plants.
    December
    1. Special requirements

    Mature vines are very heavy, especially when in bloom. Provide the plant with a sturdy structure on which to grow, such as an arbor, gazebo, fence or patio roof. It is best to not let vines grow into trees or other vegetation, as some species can damage or even kill other plants.
  • Buy

    When's the best time to buy this plant? When can you buy these from seed (if you can)? When is it usually available? What are things to look for when you're buying it? Or anything other tidbit of information you can share!

    January

    Buy wisteria bareroot when available in the nursery or via mail-order. Cutting grown or grafted plants are best, as seedlings may not bloom for many years.

    February

    Buy wisteria bareroot when available in the nursery or via mail-order. Cutting grown or grafted plants are best, as seedlings may not bloom for many years.

    March

    Buy wisteria bareroot when available in the nursery or via mail-order. Cutting grown or grafted plants are best, as seedlings may not bloom for many years.

    April

    Buy wisteria plants when available in the nursery or via mail-order. Cutting grown or grafted plants are best, as seedlings may not bloom for many years.

    May

    Buy wisteria plants when available in the nursery or via mail-order. Cutting grown or grafted plants are best, as seedlings may not bloom for many years.

    June

    Buy wisteria plants when available in the nursery or via mail-order. Cutting grown or grafted plants are best, as seedlings may not bloom for many years.

    Plant

    When's a good time to plant this plant or bulb? Any special planting instructions?

    March

    Plant in a full-sun location with excellent drainage. An area that gets less than 6 hours of sun a day will lead to poor or no flowering. When growing as a vine, choose an area where the plant will have room to roam. Plant with the graft union an inch or two above ground. To grow in a container, choose a pot that is at least 20-gallons, and plant high-quality potting soil.

    April

    Plant in a full-sun location with excellent drainage. An area that gets less than 6 hours of sun a day will lead to poor or no flowering. When growing as a vine, choose an area where the plant will have room to roam. Plant with the graft union an inch or two above ground. To grow in a container, choose a pot that is at least 20-gallons, and plant high-quality potting soil.

    May

    Plant in a full-sun location with excellent drainage. An area that gets less than 6 hours of sun a day will lead to poor or no flowering. When growing as a vine, choose an area where the plant will have room to roam. Plant with the graft union an inch or two above ground. To grow in a container, choose a pot that is at least 20-gallons, and plant high-quality potting soil.

    June

    Plant in a full-sun location with excellent drainage. An area that gets less than 6 hours of sun a day will lead to poor or no flowering. When growing as a vine, choose an area where the plant will have room to roam. Plant with the graft union an inch or two above ground. To grow in a container, choose a pot that is at least 20-gallons, and plant high-quality potting soil.

    Fertilize

    When should you fertilize this plant? Which kind of fertilizer do you recommend? Should you use different fertilizers at different times of year?

    March

    Fertilize three times a year. In spring and summer, use a fertilizer high in nitrogen, which will promote overall growth, such as a 16-16-16. In fall, use a fertilizer higher in phosphorus and potassium such as a 5-20-10. This will encourage strong roots and good flowering.

    April

    Feed once with a high-nitrogen fertilizer, such as a 16-16-16, to promote growth.

    May

    If not done last month, feed once with a high-nitrogen fertilizer, such as a 16-16-16, to promote growth.

    July

    Feed once with a high-nitrogen fertilizer, such as a 16-16-16, to promote growth.

    August

    If not done last month, feed once with a high-nitrogen fertilizer, such as a 16-16-16, to promote growth.

    October

    Encourage strong root growth and flowering next year by feeding once with a fertilizer higher in phosphorus and potassium, such as a 5-20-10.

    November

    If not done last month, encourage strong root growth and flowering next year by feeding once with a fertilizer higher in phosphorus and potassium, such as a 5-20-10.

    Water

    Is there a time to reduce or increase watering? Any special requirements? Things to avoid during certain times of the year?

    April

    Keep newly planted wisteria moist but not soggy while it becomes established. Once plant is actively growing, water in-ground plants once a week and containerized plants three to five times a week, depending on the weather.

    May

    Keep newly planted wisteria moist but not soggy while it becomes established. Once plant is actively growing, water in-ground plants once a week and containerized plants three to five times a week, depending on the weather.

    June

    Keep newly planted wisteria moist but not soggy while it becomes established. Once plant is actively growing, water in-ground plants once a week and containerized plants three to five times a week, depending on the weather.

    July

    Water in-ground plants twice a week and containerized plants five to seven times a week, depending on the weather.

    August

    Water in-ground plants twice a week and containerized plants five to seven times a week, depending on the weather.

    September

    Water in-ground plants twice a week and containerized plants five to seven times a week, depending on the weather.

    October

    Water in-ground plants once a week and containerized plants three to five times a week, depending on the weather.

    Prune

    When's a good time to prune this plant? How about deadheading, pinching back, trimming or any other grooming? Any special requirements?

    January

    Prune to control size and shape. Allow newly planted wisteria to grow and then prune to the shape you want. Remove stems as needed so that the plant grows as you desire.To train wisteria into a tree or shrub, buy one that has been trained in that manner, or remove all but one main stem and stake the plant. When it reaches the desired height, pinch the plant to force branching and rub off buds that form below that point. Prune established plants every spring or summer after blooming.

    April

    Prune to control size and shape. Allow newly planted wisteria to grow and then prune to the shape you want. Remove stems as needed so that the plant grows as you desire.To train wisteria into a tree or shrub, buy one that has been trained in that manner, or remove all but one main stem and stake the plant. When it reaches the desired height, pinch the plant to force branching and rub off buds that form below that point. Prune established plants every spring or summer after blooming.

    May

    Prune to control size and shape. Allow newly planted wisteria to grow and then prune to the shape you want. Remove stems as needed so that the plant grows as you desire.To train wisteria into a tree or shrub, buy one that has been trained in that manner, or remove all but one main stem and stake the plant. When it reaches the desired height, pinch the plant to force branching and rub off buds that form below that point. Prune established plants every spring or summer after blooming.

    June

    Prune to control size and shape. Allow newly planted wisteria to grow and then prune to the shape you want. Remove stems as needed so that the plant grows as you desire.To train wisteria into a tree or shrub, buy one that has been trained in that manner, or remove all but one main stem and stake the plant. When it reaches the desired height, pinch the plant to force branching and rub off buds that form below that point. Prune established plants every spring or summer after blooming.

    July

    Prune to control size and shape. Allow newly planted wisteria to grow and then prune to the shape you want. Remove stems as needed so that the plant grows as you desire.To train wisteria into a tree or shrub, buy one that has been trained in that manner, or remove all but one main stem and stake the plant. When it reaches the desired height, pinch the plant to force branching and rub off buds that form below that point. Prune established plants every spring or summer after blooming.

    Mulch

    Does this plant need to be mulched? Are there specific types of Mulch which are better for this plant? How much?

    April

    Maintain a 2-inch layer of shredded bark at the base of the plant to retain moisture.

    May

    Maintain a 2-inch layer of shredded bark at the base of the plant to retain moisture.

    June

    Maintain a 2-inch layer of shredded bark at the base of the plant to retain moisture.

    July

    Maintain a 2-inch layer of shredded bark at the base of the plant to retain moisture.

    August

    Maintain a 2-inch layer of shredded bark at the base of the plant to retain moisture.

    September

    Maintain a 2-inch layer of shredded bark at the base of the plant to retain moisture.

    October

    Maintain a 2-inch layer of shredded bark at the base of the plant to retain moisture.

    Pest/Disease Inspection

    What are the common problems this plant will face and when should you look for them to appear?

    March

    Check for signs of iron chlorosis, characterized by yellowing leaves and green leaf veins.

    April

    Check for signs of iron chlorosis, characterized by yellowing leaves and green leaf veins.

    May

    Check for signs of iron chlorosis, characterized by yellowing leaves and green leaf veins.

    June

    Check for signs of iron chlorosis, characterized by yellowing leaves and green leaf veins.

    July

    Check for signs of iron chlorosis, characterized by yellowing leaves and green leaf veins.

    August

    Check for signs of iron chlorosis, characterized by yellowing leaves and green leaf veins.

    September

    Check for signs of iron chlorosis, characterized by yellowing leaves and green leaf veins.

    October

    Check for signs of iron chlorosis, characterized by yellowing leaves and green leaf veins.

    Treat for Pest/Disease

    How do you treat the common problems for this plant? What products or concoctions or natural means do you use? Any special requirements?

    March

    Spray foliage with chelated iron to correct chlorosis. Since chlorosis occurs in alkaline soil, for a long-term solution amend with soil sulfur, which will acidify the soil.

    April

    Spray foliage with chelated iron to correct chlorosis. Since chlorosis occurs in alkaline soil, for a long-term solution amend with soil sulfur, which will acidify the soil.

    May

    Spray foliage with chelated iron to correct chlorosis. Since chlorosis occurs in alkaline soil, for a long-term solution amend with soil sulfur, which will acidify the soil.

    June

    Spray foliage with chelated iron to correct chlorosis. Since chlorosis occurs in alkaline soil, for a long-term solution amend with soil sulfur, which will acidify the soil.

    July

    Spray foliage with chelated iron to correct chlorosis. Since chlorosis occurs in alkaline soil, for a long-term solution amend with soil sulfur, which will acidify the soil.

    August

    Spray foliage with chelated iron to correct chlorosis. Since chlorosis occurs in alkaline soil, for a long-term solution amend with soil sulfur, which will acidify the soil.

    September

    Spray foliage with chelated iron to correct chlorosis. Since chlorosis occurs in alkaline soil, for a long-term solution amend with soil sulfur, which will acidify the soil.

    October

    Spray foliage with chelated iron to correct chlorosis. Since chlorosis occurs in alkaline soil, for a long-term solution amend with soil sulfur, which will acidify the soil.

    Special requirements

    Any other requirement for this plant? Is there anything that doesn't fit into the other care categories?

    January

    Mature vines are very heavy, especially when in bloom. Provide the plant with a sturdy structure on which to grow, such as an arbor, gazebo, fence or patio roof. It is best to not let vines grow into trees or other vegetation, as some species can damage or even kill other plants.

    February

    Mature vines are very heavy, especially when in bloom. Provide the plant with a sturdy structure on which to grow, such as an arbor, gazebo, fence or patio roof. It is best to not let vines grow into trees or other vegetation, as some species can damage or even kill other plants.

    March

    Mature vines are very heavy, especially when in bloom. Provide the plant with a sturdy structure on which to grow, such as an arbor, gazebo, fence or patio roof. It is best to not let vines grow into trees or other vegetation, as some species can damage or even kill other plants.

    April

    Mature vines are very heavy, especially when in bloom. Provide the plant with a sturdy structure on which to grow, such as an arbor, gazebo, fence or patio roof. It is best to not let vines grow into trees or other vegetation, as some species can damage or even kill other plants.

    May

    Mature vines are very heavy, especially when in bloom. Provide the plant with a sturdy structure on which to grow, such as an arbor, gazebo, fence or patio roof. It is best to not let vines grow into trees or other vegetation, as some species can damage or even kill other plants.

    June

    Mature vines are very heavy, especially when in bloom. Provide the plant with a sturdy structure on which to grow, such as an arbor, gazebo, fence or patio roof. It is best to not let vines grow into trees or other vegetation, as some species can damage or even kill other plants.

    July

    Mature vines are very heavy, especially when in bloom. Provide the plant with a sturdy structure on which to grow, such as an arbor, gazebo, fence or patio roof. It is best to not let vines grow into trees or other vegetation, as some species can damage or even kill other plants.

    August

    Mature vines are very heavy, especially when in bloom. Provide the plant with a sturdy structure on which to grow, such as an arbor, gazebo, fence or patio roof. It is best to not let vines grow into trees or other vegetation, as some species can damage or even kill other plants.

    September

    Mature vines are very heavy, especially when in bloom. Provide the plant with a sturdy structure on which to grow, such as an arbor, gazebo, fence or patio roof. It is best to not let vines grow into trees or other vegetation, as some species can damage or even kill other plants.

    October

    Mature vines are very heavy, especially when in bloom. Provide the plant with a sturdy structure on which to grow, such as an arbor, gazebo, fence or patio roof. It is best to not let vines grow into trees or other vegetation, as some species can damage or even kill other plants.

    November

    Mature vines are very heavy, especially when in bloom. Provide the plant with a sturdy structure on which to grow, such as an arbor, gazebo, fence or patio roof. It is best to not let vines grow into trees or other vegetation, as some species can damage or even kill other plants.

    December

    Mature vines are very heavy, especially when in bloom. Provide the plant with a sturdy structure on which to grow, such as an arbor, gazebo, fence or patio roof. It is best to not let vines grow into trees or other vegetation, as some species can damage or even kill other plants.

Click This Button To Use These Plant Care Reminders

Make your own gardening to-do list today!


Featured Plant Care

Swiss Chard Plant Care

Cabbage (Brassica oleracea) - Monthly Plant Care Calendar

in Edibles
You can have these monthly Plant Care Reminders sent directly to you each month!
Elegant Clarkia

Clarkia unguiculata (Elegant Clarkia) - Monthly Plant Care Reminders

in Annuals
You can have these monthly Plant Care Reminders sent directly to you each month!
Nectarine Monthly Plant Care

Nectarine (Prunus persica var. nucipersica) - Monthly Plant Care Calendar

in Edibles
You can have these monthly Plant Care Reminders sent directly to you each month!
Alyogyne hakeifolia Monthly Plant Care

Hibiscus - Red Centered (Alyogyne hakeifolia) - Monthly Plant Care Calendar

in Shrubs
You can have these monthly Plant Care Reminders sent directly to you each month!

Latest Articles

Six things for your indoor plants during winter

Do These Six Things to Keep Indoor Plants Healthy During Winter

Winter has hit southern California along with the rest of the U.S. No polar vortex here,…
Gardening Professionals and Clubs

Gardening Pros & Clubs: Using the Great Features on the Mulch

We'd like to help connect gardening professional and home gardeners. We've designed a…
Star Jasmine Monthly Plant Care

Jasmine - Star (Trachelospermum jasminoides) - Monthly Plant Care Calendar

in Vines
You can have these monthly Plant Care Reminders sent directly to you each month!
Bababerry Raspberry Monthly Plant Care

Raspberry - Bababerry (Rubus idaeus 'Bababerry') - Monthly Plant Care Calendar

in Edibles
You can have these monthly Plant Care Reminders sent directly to you each month!

Popular Articles

Baseball Field Maintenance

Baseball Field Maintenance - A General Guide for Fields of All Levels

in Lawn
More great baseball field resources can be found here (including a pdf version of this…
Queen Palm Care & Use

The Queen Palm (Syagrus romanzoffiana) Care & Use

in Trees
Jungle Music Palms and Cycads is a family owned and operated business established in 1977
Microgreens

What are Microgreens and How to Grow Them

in Edibles
Microgreens are tiny leafed vegetables that are grown from seed and require very little…
Kahili Ginger Plant Care

Hedychium gardnerianum (Kahili Ginger) - Monthly Plant Care Calendar

You can have these monthly Plant Care Reminders sent directly to you each month!

User Guides (Slide)

Popular Recommendations (Slide)