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Plant Care Instructions By Pat Hammer

There are over 400 different Hedera helix. They are very easy to grow and work in the landscape many ways. They come in an assortment of colors and leaf shapes. They are fun to collect and many things can be learned about plants by growing a few ivy. However, in our area it is important to be vigilant about making sure they are not allowed to run wild and become invasive.

Is Indoor Plant?

No

These month by month plant care tasks are for plants in the following zones :
Sunset Zones : 23, 24
USDA Zones :
Web Link - For more information
Scroll down or click on any month for plant care instructions
  • Jan
  • Feb
  • Mar
  • Apr
  • May
  • Jun
  • Jul
  • Aug
  • Sep
  • Oct
  • Nov
  • Dec
  • January
    • Buy

        Ivy is available as a house plant all year around and it does not matter when you buy it if you are not planting in the ground. House plant ivy is usually grown in 4" pots and 6"/8" hanging baskets. It is best to buy groundcover ivy or landscape ivy in the late fall just before our winter rains. Landscape Ivy is available in most nurseries many months during the year and is sold in nursery flats. Generally this ivy is not labeled and is often a combination of varieties. Generally, they are the hardiest ivies and do make a great groundcover. Look closely to be sure it is only one variety. If there is more than one variety sometimes you find that some like your location and others do not. Some will tolerate more sun that others. Some will have hardier roots than others. Any ivy will work as landscape ivy. I recommend buying ivies in the largest pots possible and plant them into the ground. They have a much larger root mass and are better equipped to handle the transition. Generally the darker green the more sun it can tolerate but I have had several variegated ivies that were perfectly happy in full sun at the coast of California.

    • Plant

        When planting into the landscape it is best to do it just before the winter rains and during shorter days. If planted in late winter early spring, water in deeply and keep soil moist, not soggy, for the first few weeks to allow the roots to get established. It may take landscape ivy a full year to really get established and start growing. Once ivy is well established it can be very drought tolerant as long as it is acclimated gradually.

    • Water

        When planting new ivies it is important to keep the soil evenly moist and avoid dry out. At first, depending on location, sun exposure, soil type and wind conditions you may need to check daily and gradually taper off how often to monitor. It is a good idea to give ivy a little TLC the first two years.

    • Mulch

        You may want to mulch newly planted ivy to help hold moisture in the soil.

    • Propagate

        Ivy is easy to propagate by soft tissue stem cuttings. Stick the cuttings in a light weight highly organic rooting or potting mix. Make sure the soil stays evenly moist, the humidity is high and the cuttings are shaded. Roots will start in 2-5 weeks.

  • February
    • Buy

        Ivy is available as a house plant all year around and it does not matter when you buy it if you are not planting in the ground. House plant ivy is usually grown in 4" pots and 6"/8" hanging baskets. It is best to buy groundcover ivy or landscape ivy in the late fall just before our winter rains. Landscape Ivy is available in most nurseries many months during the year and is sold in nursery flats. Generally this ivy is not labeled and is often a combination of varieties. Generally, they are the hardiest ivies and do make a great groundcover. Look closely to be sure it is only one variety. If there is more than one variety sometimes you find that some like your location and others do not. Some will tolerate more sun that others. Some will have hardier roots than others. Any ivy will work as landscape ivy. I recommend buying ivies in the largest pots possible and plant them into the ground. They have a much larger root mass and are better equipped to handle the transition. Generally the darker green the more sun it can tolerate but I have had several variegated ivies that were perfectly happy in full sun at the coast of California.

    • Plant

        When planting into the landscape it is best to do it just before the winter rains and during shorter days. If planted in late winter early spring, water in deeply and keep soil moist, not soggy, for the first few weeks to allow the roots to get established. It may take landscape ivy a full year to really get established and start growing. Once ivy is well established it can be very drought tolerant as long as it is acclimated gradually.

    • Water

        When planting new ivies it is important to keep the soil evenly moist and avoid dry out. At first, depending on location, sun exposure, soil type and wind conditions you may need to check daily and gradually taper off how often to monitor. It is a good idea to give ivy a little TLC the first two years.

    • Mulch

        You may want to mulch newly planted ivy to help hold moisture in the soil.

    • Propagate

        Ivy is easy to propagate by soft tissue stem cuttings. Stick the cuttings in a light weight highly organic rooting or potting mix. Make sure the soil stays evenly moist, the humidity is high and the cuttings are shaded. Roots will start in 2-5 weeks.

  • March
    • Buy

        Ivy is available as a house plant all year around and it does not matter when you buy it if you are not planting in the ground. House plant ivy is usually grown in 4" pots and 6"/8" hanging baskets. It is best to buy groundcover ivy or landscape ivy in the late fall just before our winter rains. Landscape Ivy is available in most nurseries many months during the year and is sold in nursery flats. Generally this ivy is not labeled and is often a combination of varieties. Generally, they are the hardiest ivies and do make a great groundcover. Look closely to be sure it is only one variety. If there is more than one variety sometimes you find that some like your location and others do not. Some will tolerate more sun that others. Some will have hardier roots than others. Any ivy will work as landscape ivy. I recommend buying ivies in the largest pots possible and plant them into the ground. They have a much larger root mass and are better equipped to handle the transition. Generally the darker green the more sun it can tolerate but I have had several variegated ivies that were perfectly happy in full sun at the coast of California.

    • Fertilize

        Landscape ivy should be fertilized about once per year to keep it green. Use liquid or granular and chose something with high nitrogen for foliage growth and not flowering.

    • Water

        Generally, once an ivy is established in the landscape it is pretty drought tolerant. I would still recommend a weekly, bi-weekly deep watering during the hotter months. This helps to keep the ivy in the best shape to avoid problems.

    • Propagate

        Ivy is easy to propagate by soft tissue stem cuttings. Stick the cuttings in a light weight highly organic rooting or potting mix. Make sure the soil stays evenly moist, the humidity is high and the cuttings are shaded. Roots will start in 2-5 weeks.

  • April
    • Buy

        Ivy is available as a house plant all year around and it does not matter when you buy it if you are not planting in the ground. House plant ivy is usually grown in 4" pots and 6"/8" hanging baskets. It is best to buy groundcover ivy or landscape ivy in the late fall just before our winter rains. Landscape Ivy is available in most nurseries many months during the year and is sold in nursery flats. Generally this ivy is not labeled and is often a combination of varieties. Generally, they are the hardiest ivies and do make a great groundcover. Look closely to be sure it is only one variety. If there is more than one variety sometimes you find that some like your location and others do not. Some will tolerate more sun that others. Some will have hardier roots than others. Any ivy will work as landscape ivy. I recommend buying ivies in the largest pots possible and plant them into the ground. They have a much larger root mass and are better equipped to handle the transition. Generally the darker green the more sun it can tolerate but I have had several variegated ivies that were perfectly happy in full sun at the coast of California.

    • Fertilize

        Landscape ivy should be fertilized about once per year to keep it green. Use liquid or granular and chose something with high nitrogen for foliage growth and not flowering.

    • Water

        Generally, once an ivy is established in the landscape it is pretty drought tolerant. I would still recommend a weekly, bi-weekly deep watering during the hotter months. This helps to keep the ivy in the best shape to avoid problems.

    • Prune

        Ivies can be a wonderful addition to the landscape but it is important to keep them under control. I recommend pruning twice per year. Just after the first flush of growth and again after the growing season. Ivy respond well to trimming and pruning. You can cut them back really hard to almost 10% of their foliage and they will return. I would not cut them that hard each time but you can do that probably every couple of years if needed. In the spring I like to give a hard prune and clean out any dead debris, pick off brown leaves, and generally clean up the plant and help avoid pests and deceases during the year.

    • Propagate

        Ivy is easy to propagate by soft tissue stem cuttings. Stick the cuttings in a light weight highly organic rooting or potting mix. Make sure the soil stays evenly moist, the humidity is high and the cuttings are shaded. Roots will start in 2-5 weeks.

  • May
    • Buy

        Ivy is available as a house plant all year around and it does not matter when you buy it if you are not planting in the ground. House plant ivy is usually grown in 4" pots and 6"/8" hanging baskets. It is best to buy groundcover ivy or landscape ivy in the late fall just before our winter rains. Landscape Ivy is available in most nurseries many months during the year and is sold in nursery flats. Generally this ivy is not labeled and is often a combination of varieties. Generally, they are the hardiest ivies and do make a great groundcover. Look closely to be sure it is only one variety. If there is more than one variety sometimes you find that some like your location and others do not. Some will tolerate more sun that others. Some will have hardier roots than others. Any ivy will work as landscape ivy. I recommend buying ivies in the largest pots possible and plant them into the ground. They have a much larger root mass and are better equipped to handle the transition. Generally the darker green the more sun it can tolerate but I have had several variegated ivies that were perfectly happy in full sun at the coast of California.

    • Water

        Generally, once an ivy is established in the landscape it is pretty drought tolerant. I would still recommend a weekly, bi-weekly deep watering during the hotter months. This helps to keep the ivy in the best shape to avoid problems.

    • Prune

        Ivies can be a wonderful addition to the landscape but it is important to keep them under control. I recommend pruning twice per year. Just after the first flush of growth and again after the growing season. Ivy respond well to trimming and pruning. You can cut them back really hard to almost 10% of their foliage and they will return. I would not cut them that hard each time but you can do that probably every couple of years if needed. In the spring I like to give a hard prune and clean out any dead debris, pick off brown leaves, and generally clean up the plant and help avoid pests and deceases during the year.

    • Pest/Disease Inspection

        In early spring after the first big flush of growth and the weather warms look for aphids on ivy. Generally if you see aphids on landscape or outdoor ivy, wait about two to three weeks as there is a natural predator that comes along and take care of the aphid problem. You can tell if this tiny wasp is present because you will see these tiny hard pearl-gray colored balls on the plant. The wasp stings the aphid, lays it's eggs in the fleshy body and kills off the aphid.

    • Propagate

        Ivy is easy to propagate by soft tissue stem cuttings. Stick the cuttings in a light weight highly organic rooting or potting mix. Make sure the soil stays evenly moist, the humidity is high and the cuttings are shaded. Roots will start in 2-5 weeks.

  • June
    • Buy

        Ivy is available as a house plant all year around and it does not matter when you buy it if you are not planting in the ground. House plant ivy is usually grown in 4" pots and 6"/8" hanging baskets. It is best to buy groundcover ivy or landscape ivy in the late fall just before our winter rains. Landscape Ivy is available in most nurseries many months during the year and is sold in nursery flats. Generally this ivy is not labeled and is often a combination of varieties. Generally, they are the hardiest ivies and do make a great groundcover. Look closely to be sure it is only one variety. If there is more than one variety sometimes you find that some like your location and others do not. Some will tolerate more sun that others. Some will have hardier roots than others. Any ivy will work as landscape ivy. I recommend buying ivies in the largest pots possible and plant them into the ground. They have a much larger root mass and are better equipped to handle the transition. Generally the darker green the more sun it can tolerate but I have had several variegated ivies that were perfectly happy in full sun at the coast of California.

    • Water

        Generally, once an ivy is established in the landscape it is pretty drought tolerant. I would still recommend a weekly, bi-weekly deep watering during the hotter months. This helps to keep the ivy in the best shape to avoid problems.

    • Prune

        Ivies can be a wonderful addition to the landscape but it is important to keep them under control. I recommend pruning twice per year. Just after the first flush of growth and again after the growing season. Ivy respond well to trimming and pruning. You can cut them back really hard to almost 10% of their foliage and they will return. I would not cut them that hard each time but you can do that probably every couple of years if needed. In the spring I like to give a hard prune and clean out any dead debris, pick off brown leaves, and generally clean up the plant and help avoid pests and deceases during the year.

    • Pest/Disease Inspection

        In early spring after the first big flush of growth and the weather warms look for aphids on ivy. Generally if you see aphids on landscape or outdoor ivy, wait about two to three weeks as there is a natural predator that comes along and take care of the aphid problem. You can tell if this tiny wasp is present because you will see these tiny hard pearl-gray colored balls on the plant. The wasp stings the aphid, lays it's eggs in the fleshy body and kills off the aphid.

  • July
    • Buy

        Ivy is available as a house plant all year around and it does not matter when you buy it if you are not planting in the ground. House plant ivy is usually grown in 4" pots and 6"/8" hanging baskets. It is best to buy groundcover ivy or landscape ivy in the late fall just before our winter rains. Landscape Ivy is available in most nurseries many months during the year and is sold in nursery flats. Generally this ivy is not labeled and is often a combination of varieties. Generally, they are the hardiest ivies and do make a great groundcover. Look closely to be sure it is only one variety. If there is more than one variety sometimes you find that some like your location and others do not. Some will tolerate more sun that others. Some will have hardier roots than others. Any ivy will work as landscape ivy. I recommend buying ivies in the largest pots possible and plant them into the ground. They have a much larger root mass and are better equipped to handle the transition. Generally the darker green the more sun it can tolerate but I have had several variegated ivies that were perfectly happy in full sun at the coast of California.

    • Water

        Generally, once an ivy is established in the landscape it is pretty drought tolerant. I would still recommend a weekly, bi-weekly deep watering during the hotter months. This helps to keep the ivy in the best shape to avoid problems.

    • Pest/Disease Inspection

        In July when the summer has turned hot and dry watch for Red Spider Mites. These are very tiny spider-like insects that generally live on the underside of the leaf. You may need a magnifying glass to see them. The best way to control mites is by using a strong water spray from the garden hose, making sure to hit the undersides. Mites hate cold water and generally they are washed away. This will need to be repeated every 7-10 days.

  • August
    • Buy

        Ivy is available as a house plant all year around and it does not matter when you buy it if you are not planting in the ground. House plant ivy is usually grown in 4" pots and 6"/8" hanging baskets. It is best to buy groundcover ivy or landscape ivy in the late fall just before our winter rains. Landscape Ivy is available in most nurseries many months during the year and is sold in nursery flats. Generally this ivy is not labeled and is often a combination of varieties. Generally, they are the hardiest ivies and do make a great groundcover. Look closely to be sure it is only one variety. If there is more than one variety sometimes you find that some like your location and others do not. Some will tolerate more sun that others. Some will have hardier roots than others. Any ivy will work as landscape ivy. I recommend buying ivies in the largest pots possible and plant them into the ground. They have a much larger root mass and are better equipped to handle the transition. Generally the darker green the more sun it can tolerate but I have had several variegated ivies that were perfectly happy in full sun at the coast of California.

    • Water

        Generally, once an ivy is established in the landscape it is pretty drought tolerant. I would still recommend a weekly, bi-weekly deep watering during the hotter months. This helps to keep the ivy in the best shape to avoid problems.

    • Pest/Disease Inspection

        Red Spider Mites

  • September
    • Buy

        Ivy is available as a house plant all year around and it does not matter when you buy it if you are not planting in the ground. House plant ivy is usually grown in 4" pots and 6"/8" hanging baskets. It is best to buy groundcover ivy or landscape ivy in the late fall just before our winter rains. Landscape Ivy is available in most nurseries many months during the year and is sold in nursery flats. Generally this ivy is not labeled and is often a combination of varieties. Generally, they are the hardiest ivies and do make a great groundcover. Look closely to be sure it is only one variety. If there is more than one variety sometimes you find that some like your location and others do not. Some will tolerate more sun that others. Some will have hardier roots than others. Any ivy will work as landscape ivy. I recommend buying ivies in the largest pots possible and plant them into the ground. They have a much larger root mass and are better equipped to handle the transition. Generally the darker green the more sun it can tolerate but I have had several variegated ivies that were perfectly happy in full sun at the coast of California.

    • Water

        Generally, once an ivy is established in the landscape it is pretty drought tolerant. I would still recommend a weekly, bi-weekly deep watering during the hotter months. This helps to keep the ivy in the best shape to avoid problems.

    • Pest/Disease Inspection

        Red Spider Mites

  • October
    • Buy

        Ivy is available as a house plant all year around and it does not matter when you buy it if you are not planting in the ground. House plant ivy is usually grown in 4" pots and 6"/8" hanging baskets. It is best to buy groundcover ivy or landscape ivy in the late fall just before our winter rains. Landscape Ivy is available in most nurseries many months during the year and is sold in nursery flats. Generally this ivy is not labeled and is often a combination of varieties. Generally, they are the hardiest ivies and do make a great groundcover. Look closely to be sure it is only one variety. If there is more than one variety sometimes you find that some like your location and others do not. Some will tolerate more sun that others. Some will have hardier roots than others. Any ivy will work as landscape ivy. I recommend buying ivies in the largest pots possible and plant them into the ground. They have a much larger root mass and are better equipped to handle the transition. Generally the darker green the more sun it can tolerate but I have had several variegated ivies that were perfectly happy in full sun at the coast of California.

    • Water

        Generally, once an ivy is established in the landscape it is pretty drought tolerant. I would still recommend a weekly, bi-weekly deep watering during the hotter months. This helps to keep the ivy in the best shape to avoid problems.

    • Prune

        After the summer growing season, cut ivy back to control.

    • Pest/Disease Inspection

        Red Spider Mites

  • November
    • Buy

        IIvy is available as a house plant all year around and it does not matter when you buy it if you are not planting in the ground. House plant ivy is usually grown in 4" pots and 6"/8" hanging baskets. It is best to buy groundcover ivy or landscape ivy in the late fall just before our winter rains. Landscape Ivy is available in most nurseries many months during the year and is sold in nursery flats. Generally this ivy is not labeled and is often a combination of varieties. Generally, they are the hardiest ivies and do make a great groundcover. Look closely to be sure it is only one variety. If there is more than one variety sometimes you find that some like your location and others do not. Some will tolerate more sun that others. Some will have hardier roots than others. Any ivy will work as landscape ivy. I recommend buying ivies in the largest pots possible and plant them into the ground. They have a much larger root mass and are better equipped to handle the transition. Generally the darker green the more sun it can tolerate but I have had several variegated ivies that were perfectly happy in full sun at the coast of California.

    • Plant

        When planting into the landscape it is best to do it just before the winter rains and during shorter days. If planted in late winter early spring, water in deeply and keep soil moist, not soggy, for the first few weeks to allow the roots to get established. It may take landscape ivy a full year to really get established and start growing. Once ivy is well established it can be very drought tolerant as long as it is acclimated gradually.

    • Water

        When planting new ivies it is important to keep the soil evenly moist and avoid dry out. At first, depending on location, sun exposure, soil type and wind conditions you may need to check daily and gradually taper off how often to monitor. It is a good idea to give ivy a little TLC the first two years.

    • Prune

        After the summer growing season, cut ivy back to control.

    • Mulch

        You may want to mulch newly planted ivy to help hold moisture in the soil.

    • Propagate

        Ivy is easy to propagate by soft tissue stem cuttings. Stick the cuttings in a light weight highly organic rooting or potting mix. Make sure the soil stays evenly moist, the humidity is high and the cuttings are shaded. Roots will start in 2-5 weeks.

  • December
    • Buy

        Ivy is available as a house plant all year around and it does not matter when you buy it if you are not planting in the ground. House plant ivy is usually grown in 4" pots and 6"/8" hanging baskets. It is best to buy groundcover ivy or landscape ivy in the late fall just before our winter rains. Landscape Ivy is available in most nurseries many months during the year and is sold in nursery flats. Generally this ivy is not labeled and is often a combination of varieties. Generally, they are the hardiest ivies and do make a great groundcover. Look closely to be sure it is only one variety. If there is more than one variety sometimes you find that some like your location and others do not. Some will tolerate more sun that others. Some will have hardier roots than others. Any ivy will work as landscape ivy. I recommend buying ivies in the largest pots possible and plant them into the ground. They have a much larger root mass and are better equipped to handle the transition. Generally the darker green the more sun it can tolerate but I have had several variegated ivies that were perfectly happy in full sun at the coast of California.

    • Plant

        When planting into the landscape it is best to do it just before the winter rains and during shorter days. If planted in late winter early spring, water in deeply and keep soil moist, not soggy, for the first few weeks to allow the roots to get established. It may take landscape ivy a full year to really get established and start growing. Once ivy is well established it can be very drought tolerant as long as it is acclimated gradually.

    • Water

        When planting new ivies it is important to keep the soil evenly moist and avoid dry out. At first, depending on location, sun exposure, soil type and wind conditions you may need to check daily and gradually taper off how often to monitor. It is a good idea to give ivy a little TLC the first two years.

    • Prune

        After the summer growing season, cut ivy back to control.

    • Mulch

        You may want to mulch newly planted ivy to help hold moisture in the soil.

    • Propagate

        Ivy is easy to propagate by soft tissue stem cuttings. Stick the cuttings in a light weight highly organic rooting or potting mix. Make sure the soil stays evenly moist, the humidity is high and the cuttings are shaded. Roots will start in 2-5 weeks.

  • Winter
    • Spring
      • Summer
        • Fall
          • Buy

            When's the best time to buy this plant? When can you buy these from seed (if you can)? When is it usually available? What are things to look for when you're buying it? Or anything other tidbit of information you can share!

            •  Jan
            •  Feb
            •  Mar
            •  Apr
            •  May
            •  Jun
            •  Jul
            •  Aug
            •  Sep
            •  Oct
            •  Nov
            •  Dec
            • January

              Ivy is available as a house plant all year around and it does not matter when you buy it if you are not planting in the ground. House plant ivy is usually grown in 4\" pots and 6\"/8\" hanging baskets. It is best to buy groundcover ivy or landscape ivy in the late fall just before our winter rains. Landscape Ivy is available in most nurseries many months during the year and is sold in nursery flats. Generally this ivy is not labeled and is often a combination of varieties. Generally, they are the hardiest ivies and do make a great groundcover. Look closely to be sure it is only one variety. If there is more than one variety sometimes you find that some like your location and others do not. Some will tolerate more sun that others. Some will have hardier roots than others. Any ivy will work as landscape ivy. I recommend buying ivies in the largest pots possible and plant them into the ground. They have a much larger root mass and are better equipped to handle the transition. Generally the darker green the more sun it can tolerate but I have had several variegated ivies that were perfectly happy in full sun at the coast of California.

            • February

              Ivy is available as a house plant all year around and it does not matter when you buy it if you are not planting in the ground. House plant ivy is usually grown in 4\" pots and 6\"/8\" hanging baskets. It is best to buy groundcover ivy or landscape ivy in the late fall just before our winter rains. Landscape Ivy is available in most nurseries many months during the year and is sold in nursery flats. Generally this ivy is not labeled and is often a combination of varieties. Generally, they are the hardiest ivies and do make a great groundcover. Look closely to be sure it is only one variety. If there is more than one variety sometimes you find that some like your location and others do not. Some will tolerate more sun that others. Some will have hardier roots than others. Any ivy will work as landscape ivy. I recommend buying ivies in the largest pots possible and plant them into the ground. They have a much larger root mass and are better equipped to handle the transition. Generally the darker green the more sun it can tolerate but I have had several variegated ivies that were perfectly happy in full sun at the coast of California.

            • March

              Ivy is available as a house plant all year around and it does not matter when you buy it if you are not planting in the ground. House plant ivy is usually grown in 4\" pots and 6\"/8\" hanging baskets. It is best to buy groundcover ivy or landscape ivy in the late fall just before our winter rains. Landscape Ivy is available in most nurseries many months during the year and is sold in nursery flats. Generally this ivy is not labeled and is often a combination of varieties. Generally, they are the hardiest ivies and do make a great groundcover. Look closely to be sure it is only one variety. If there is more than one variety sometimes you find that some like your location and others do not. Some will tolerate more sun that others. Some will have hardier roots than others. Any ivy will work as landscape ivy. I recommend buying ivies in the largest pots possible and plant them into the ground. They have a much larger root mass and are better equipped to handle the transition. Generally the darker green the more sun it can tolerate but I have had several variegated ivies that were perfectly happy in full sun at the coast of California.

            • April

              Ivy is available as a house plant all year around and it does not matter when you buy it if you are not planting in the ground. House plant ivy is usually grown in 4\" pots and 6\"/8\" hanging baskets. It is best to buy groundcover ivy or landscape ivy in the late fall just before our winter rains. Landscape Ivy is available in most nurseries many months during the year and is sold in nursery flats. Generally this ivy is not labeled and is often a combination of varieties. Generally, they are the hardiest ivies and do make a great groundcover. Look closely to be sure it is only one variety. If there is more than one variety sometimes you find that some like your location and others do not. Some will tolerate more sun that others. Some will have hardier roots than others. Any ivy will work as landscape ivy. I recommend buying ivies in the largest pots possible and plant them into the ground. They have a much larger root mass and are better equipped to handle the transition. Generally the darker green the more sun it can tolerate but I have had several variegated ivies that were perfectly happy in full sun at the coast of California.

            • May

              Ivy is available as a house plant all year around and it does not matter when you buy it if you are not planting in the ground. House plant ivy is usually grown in 4\" pots and 6\"/8\" hanging baskets. It is best to buy groundcover ivy or landscape ivy in the late fall just before our winter rains. Landscape Ivy is available in most nurseries many months during the year and is sold in nursery flats. Generally this ivy is not labeled and is often a combination of varieties. Generally, they are the hardiest ivies and do make a great groundcover. Look closely to be sure it is only one variety. If there is more than one variety sometimes you find that some like your location and others do not. Some will tolerate more sun that others. Some will have hardier roots than others. Any ivy will work as landscape ivy. I recommend buying ivies in the largest pots possible and plant them into the ground. They have a much larger root mass and are better equipped to handle the transition. Generally the darker green the more sun it can tolerate but I have had several variegated ivies that were perfectly happy in full sun at the coast of California.

            • June

              Ivy is available as a house plant all year around and it does not matter when you buy it if you are not planting in the ground. House plant ivy is usually grown in 4\" pots and 6\"/8\" hanging baskets. It is best to buy groundcover ivy or landscape ivy in the late fall just before our winter rains. Landscape Ivy is available in most nurseries many months during the year and is sold in nursery flats. Generally this ivy is not labeled and is often a combination of varieties. Generally, they are the hardiest ivies and do make a great groundcover. Look closely to be sure it is only one variety. If there is more than one variety sometimes you find that some like your location and others do not. Some will tolerate more sun that others. Some will have hardier roots than others. Any ivy will work as landscape ivy. I recommend buying ivies in the largest pots possible and plant them into the ground. They have a much larger root mass and are better equipped to handle the transition. Generally the darker green the more sun it can tolerate but I have had several variegated ivies that were perfectly happy in full sun at the coast of California.

            • July

              Ivy is available as a house plant all year around and it does not matter when you buy it if you are not planting in the ground. House plant ivy is usually grown in 4\" pots and 6\"/8\" hanging baskets. It is best to buy groundcover ivy or landscape ivy in the late fall just before our winter rains. Landscape Ivy is available in most nurseries many months during the year and is sold in nursery flats. Generally this ivy is not labeled and is often a combination of varieties. Generally, they are the hardiest ivies and do make a great groundcover. Look closely to be sure it is only one variety. If there is more than one variety sometimes you find that some like your location and others do not. Some will tolerate more sun that others. Some will have hardier roots than others. Any ivy will work as landscape ivy. I recommend buying ivies in the largest pots possible and plant them into the ground. They have a much larger root mass and are better equipped to handle the transition. Generally the darker green the more sun it can tolerate but I have had several variegated ivies that were perfectly happy in full sun at the coast of California.

            • August

              Ivy is available as a house plant all year around and it does not matter when you buy it if you are not planting in the ground. House plant ivy is usually grown in 4\" pots and 6\"/8\" hanging baskets. It is best to buy groundcover ivy or landscape ivy in the late fall just before our winter rains. Landscape Ivy is available in most nurseries many months during the year and is sold in nursery flats. Generally this ivy is not labeled and is often a combination of varieties. Generally, they are the hardiest ivies and do make a great groundcover. Look closely to be sure it is only one variety. If there is more than one variety sometimes you find that some like your location and others do not. Some will tolerate more sun that others. Some will have hardier roots than others. Any ivy will work as landscape ivy. I recommend buying ivies in the largest pots possible and plant them into the ground. They have a much larger root mass and are better equipped to handle the transition. Generally the darker green the more sun it can tolerate but I have had several variegated ivies that were perfectly happy in full sun at the coast of California.

            • September

              Ivy is available as a house plant all year around and it does not matter when you buy it if you are not planting in the ground. House plant ivy is usually grown in 4\" pots and 6\"/8\" hanging baskets. It is best to buy groundcover ivy or landscape ivy in the late fall just before our winter rains. Landscape Ivy is available in most nurseries many months during the year and is sold in nursery flats. Generally this ivy is not labeled and is often a combination of varieties. Generally, they are the hardiest ivies and do make a great groundcover. Look closely to be sure it is only one variety. If there is more than one variety sometimes you find that some like your location and others do not. Some will tolerate more sun that others. Some will have hardier roots than others. Any ivy will work as landscape ivy. I recommend buying ivies in the largest pots possible and plant them into the ground. They have a much larger root mass and are better equipped to handle the transition. Generally the darker green the more sun it can tolerate but I have had several variegated ivies that were perfectly happy in full sun at the coast of California.

            • October

              Ivy is available as a house plant all year around and it does not matter when you buy it if you are not planting in the ground. House plant ivy is usually grown in 4\" pots and 6\"/8\" hanging baskets. It is best to buy groundcover ivy or landscape ivy in the late fall just before our winter rains. Landscape Ivy is available in most nurseries many months during the year and is sold in nursery flats. Generally this ivy is not labeled and is often a combination of varieties. Generally, they are the hardiest ivies and do make a great groundcover. Look closely to be sure it is only one variety. If there is more than one variety sometimes you find that some like your location and others do not. Some will tolerate more sun that others. Some will have hardier roots than others. Any ivy will work as landscape ivy. I recommend buying ivies in the largest pots possible and plant them into the ground. They have a much larger root mass and are better equipped to handle the transition. Generally the darker green the more sun it can tolerate but I have had several variegated ivies that were perfectly happy in full sun at the coast of California.

            • November

              IIvy is available as a house plant all year around and it does not matter when you buy it if you are not planting in the ground. House plant ivy is usually grown in 4\" pots and 6\"/8\" hanging baskets. It is best to buy groundcover ivy or landscape ivy in the late fall just before our winter rains. Landscape Ivy is available in most nurseries many months during the year and is sold in nursery flats. Generally this ivy is not labeled and is often a combination of varieties. Generally, they are the hardiest ivies and do make a great groundcover. Look closely to be sure it is only one variety. If there is more than one variety sometimes you find that some like your location and others do not. Some will tolerate more sun that others. Some will have hardier roots than others. Any ivy will work as landscape ivy. I recommend buying ivies in the largest pots possible and plant them into the ground. They have a much larger root mass and are better equipped to handle the transition. Generally the darker green the more sun it can tolerate but I have had several variegated ivies that were perfectly happy in full sun at the coast of California.

            • December

              Ivy is available as a house plant all year around and it does not matter when you buy it if you are not planting in the ground. House plant ivy is usually grown in 4\" pots and 6\"/8\" hanging baskets. It is best to buy groundcover ivy or landscape ivy in the late fall just before our winter rains. Landscape Ivy is available in most nurseries many months during the year and is sold in nursery flats. Generally this ivy is not labeled and is often a combination of varieties. Generally, they are the hardiest ivies and do make a great groundcover. Look closely to be sure it is only one variety. If there is more than one variety sometimes you find that some like your location and others do not. Some will tolerate more sun that others. Some will have hardier roots than others. Any ivy will work as landscape ivy. I recommend buying ivies in the largest pots possible and plant them into the ground. They have a much larger root mass and are better equipped to handle the transition. Generally the darker green the more sun it can tolerate but I have had several variegated ivies that were perfectly happy in full sun at the coast of California.

          • Plant

            When's a good time to plant this plant or bulb? Any special planting instructions?

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            • January

              When planting into the landscape it is best to do it just before the winter rains and during shorter days. If planted in late winter early spring, water in deeply and keep soil moist, not soggy, for the first few weeks to allow the roots to get established. It may take landscape ivy a full year to really get established and start growing. Once ivy is well established it can be very drought tolerant as long as it is acclimated gradually.

            • February

              When planting into the landscape it is best to do it just before the winter rains and during shorter days. If planted in late winter early spring, water in deeply and keep soil moist, not soggy, for the first few weeks to allow the roots to get established. It may take landscape ivy a full year to really get established and start growing. Once ivy is well established it can be very drought tolerant as long as it is acclimated gradually.

            • November

              When planting into the landscape it is best to do it just before the winter rains and during shorter days. If planted in late winter early spring, water in deeply and keep soil moist, not soggy, for the first few weeks to allow the roots to get established. It may take landscape ivy a full year to really get established and start growing. Once ivy is well established it can be very drought tolerant as long as it is acclimated gradually.

            • December

              When planting into the landscape it is best to do it just before the winter rains and during shorter days. If planted in late winter early spring, water in deeply and keep soil moist, not soggy, for the first few weeks to allow the roots to get established. It may take landscape ivy a full year to really get established and start growing. Once ivy is well established it can be very drought tolerant as long as it is acclimated gradually.

          • Sow Seeds

            When can you plant these seeds? When's the best time? Can you start them indoors and move them out? Do they have any special requirements?

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            • Fertilize

              When should you fertilize this plant? Which kind of fertilizer do you recommend? Should you use different fertilizers at different times of year?

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              • March

                Landscape ivy should be fertilized about once per year to keep it green. Use liquid or granular and chose something with high nitrogen for foliage growth and not flowering.

              • April

                Landscape ivy should be fertilized about once per year to keep it green. Use liquid or granular and chose something with high nitrogen for foliage growth and not flowering.

            • Water

              Is there a time to reduce or increase watering? Any special requirements? Things to avoid during certain times of the year?

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              • January

                When planting new ivies it is important to keep the soil evenly moist and avoid dry out. At first, depending on location, sun exposure, soil type and wind conditions you may need to check daily and gradually taper off how often to monitor. It is a good idea to give ivy a little TLC the first two years.

              • February

                When planting new ivies it is important to keep the soil evenly moist and avoid dry out. At first, depending on location, sun exposure, soil type and wind conditions you may need to check daily and gradually taper off how often to monitor. It is a good idea to give ivy a little TLC the first two years.

              • March

                Generally, once an ivy is established in the landscape it is pretty drought tolerant. I would still recommend a weekly, bi-weekly deep watering during the hotter months. This helps to keep the ivy in the best shape to avoid problems.

              • April

                Generally, once an ivy is established in the landscape it is pretty drought tolerant. I would still recommend a weekly, bi-weekly deep watering during the hotter months. This helps to keep the ivy in the best shape to avoid problems.

              • May

                Generally, once an ivy is established in the landscape it is pretty drought tolerant. I would still recommend a weekly, bi-weekly deep watering during the hotter months. This helps to keep the ivy in the best shape to avoid problems.

              • June

                Generally, once an ivy is established in the landscape it is pretty drought tolerant. I would still recommend a weekly, bi-weekly deep watering during the hotter months. This helps to keep the ivy in the best shape to avoid problems.

              • July

                Generally, once an ivy is established in the landscape it is pretty drought tolerant. I would still recommend a weekly, bi-weekly deep watering during the hotter months. This helps to keep the ivy in the best shape to avoid problems.

              • August

                Generally, once an ivy is established in the landscape it is pretty drought tolerant. I would still recommend a weekly, bi-weekly deep watering during the hotter months. This helps to keep the ivy in the best shape to avoid problems.

              • September

                Generally, once an ivy is established in the landscape it is pretty drought tolerant. I would still recommend a weekly, bi-weekly deep watering during the hotter months. This helps to keep the ivy in the best shape to avoid problems.

              • October

                Generally, once an ivy is established in the landscape it is pretty drought tolerant. I would still recommend a weekly, bi-weekly deep watering during the hotter months. This helps to keep the ivy in the best shape to avoid problems.

              • November

                When planting new ivies it is important to keep the soil evenly moist and avoid dry out. At first, depending on location, sun exposure, soil type and wind conditions you may need to check daily and gradually taper off how often to monitor. It is a good idea to give ivy a little TLC the first two years.

              • December

                When planting new ivies it is important to keep the soil evenly moist and avoid dry out. At first, depending on location, sun exposure, soil type and wind conditions you may need to check daily and gradually taper off how often to monitor. It is a good idea to give ivy a little TLC the first two years.

            • Prune

              When's a good time to prune this plant? How about deadheading, pinching back, trimming or any other grooming? Any special requirements?

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              • April

                Ivies can be a wonderful addition to the landscape but it is important to keep them under control. I recommend pruning twice per year. Just after the first flush of growth and again after the growing season. Ivy respond well to trimming and pruning. You can cut them back really hard to almost 10% of their foliage and they will return. I would not cut them that hard each time but you can do that probably every couple of years if needed. In the spring I like to give a hard prune and clean out any dead debris, pick off brown leaves, and generally clean up the plant and help avoid pests and deceases during the year.

              • May

                Ivies can be a wonderful addition to the landscape but it is important to keep them under control. I recommend pruning twice per year. Just after the first flush of growth and again after the growing season. Ivy respond well to trimming and pruning. You can cut them back really hard to almost 10% of their foliage and they will return. I would not cut them that hard each time but you can do that probably every couple of years if needed. In the spring I like to give a hard prune and clean out any dead debris, pick off brown leaves, and generally clean up the plant and help avoid pests and deceases during the year.

              • June

                Ivies can be a wonderful addition to the landscape but it is important to keep them under control. I recommend pruning twice per year. Just after the first flush of growth and again after the growing season. Ivy respond well to trimming and pruning. You can cut them back really hard to almost 10% of their foliage and they will return. I would not cut them that hard each time but you can do that probably every couple of years if needed. In the spring I like to give a hard prune and clean out any dead debris, pick off brown leaves, and generally clean up the plant and help avoid pests and deceases during the year.

              • October

                After the summer growing season, cut ivy back to control.

              • November

                After the summer growing season, cut ivy back to control.

              • December

                After the summer growing season, cut ivy back to control.

            • Mulch

              Does this plant need to be mulched? Are there specific types of Mulch which are better for this plant? How much?

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              • January

                You may want to mulch newly planted ivy to help hold moisture in the soil.

              • February

                You may want to mulch newly planted ivy to help hold moisture in the soil.

              • November

                You may want to mulch newly planted ivy to help hold moisture in the soil.

              • December

                You may want to mulch newly planted ivy to help hold moisture in the soil.

            • Protect

              When and how should you protect this plant from birds, deer, rabbits? Does this plant need be covered, or wrapped or painted or moved?

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              • Pest/Disease Inspection

                What are the common problems this plant will face and when should you look for them to appear?

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                • May

                  In early spring after the first big flush of growth and the weather warms look for aphids on ivy. Generally if you see aphids on landscape or outdoor ivy, wait about two to three weeks as there is a natural predator that comes along and take care of the aphid problem. You can tell if this tiny wasp is present because you will see these tiny hard pearl-gray colored balls on the plant. The wasp stings the aphid, lays it\'s eggs in the fleshy body and kills off the aphid.

                • June

                  In early spring after the first big flush of growth and the weather warms look for aphids on ivy. Generally if you see aphids on landscape or outdoor ivy, wait about two to three weeks as there is a natural predator that comes along and take care of the aphid problem. You can tell if this tiny wasp is present because you will see these tiny hard pearl-gray colored balls on the plant. The wasp stings the aphid, lays it\'s eggs in the fleshy body and kills off the aphid.

                • July

                  In July when the summer has turned hot and dry watch for Red Spider Mites. These are very tiny spider-like insects that generally live on the underside of the leaf. You may need a magnifying glass to see them. The best way to control mites is by using a strong water spray from the garden hose, making sure to hit the undersides. Mites hate cold water and generally they are washed away. This will need to be repeated every 7-10 days.

                • August

                  Red Spider Mites

                • September

                  Red Spider Mites

                • October

                  Red Spider Mites

              • Treat for Pest/Disease

                How do you treat the common problems for this plant? What products or concoctions or natural means do you use? Any special requirements?

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                • Transplant

                  When's the best time to dig up and transplant this from one spot to another? (This is different than planting). Any special requirements?

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                  • Propagate

                    When's a good time to divide, take cuttings, layer or propagate this plant. Any special requirements?

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                    • January

                      Ivy is easy to propagate by soft tissue stem cuttings. Stick the cuttings in a light weight highly organic rooting or potting mix. Make sure the soil stays evenly moist, the humidity is high and the cuttings are shaded. Roots will start in 2-5 weeks.

                    • February

                      Ivy is easy to propagate by soft tissue stem cuttings. Stick the cuttings in a light weight highly organic rooting or potting mix. Make sure the soil stays evenly moist, the humidity is high and the cuttings are shaded. Roots will start in 2-5 weeks.

                    • March

                      Ivy is easy to propagate by soft tissue stem cuttings. Stick the cuttings in a light weight highly organic rooting or potting mix. Make sure the soil stays evenly moist, the humidity is high and the cuttings are shaded. Roots will start in 2-5 weeks.

                    • April

                      Ivy is easy to propagate by soft tissue stem cuttings. Stick the cuttings in a light weight highly organic rooting or potting mix. Make sure the soil stays evenly moist, the humidity is high and the cuttings are shaded. Roots will start in 2-5 weeks.

                    • May

                      Ivy is easy to propagate by soft tissue stem cuttings. Stick the cuttings in a light weight highly organic rooting or potting mix. Make sure the soil stays evenly moist, the humidity is high and the cuttings are shaded. Roots will start in 2-5 weeks.

                    • November

                      Ivy is easy to propagate by soft tissue stem cuttings. Stick the cuttings in a light weight highly organic rooting or potting mix. Make sure the soil stays evenly moist, the humidity is high and the cuttings are shaded. Roots will start in 2-5 weeks.

                    • December

                      Ivy is easy to propagate by soft tissue stem cuttings. Stick the cuttings in a light weight highly organic rooting or potting mix. Make sure the soil stays evenly moist, the humidity is high and the cuttings are shaded. Roots will start in 2-5 weeks.

                  • Harvest

                    When's a good time to harvest this plant? What's the best way to harvest? Are there special requirements or features?

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                    • Special requirements

                      Any other requirement for this plant? Is there anything that doesn't fit into the other care categories?

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                      •  Dec

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