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Red raspberry
Plant Care Instructions By Julie Bawden-Davis

Edible red raspberry that is native to North America, Asia and Europe. Canes generally grow full size in first year and produce fruit the second year. Everbearing varieties produce two crops per year--in spring and again in fall. Canes die back after fruiting second time.

Is Indoor Plant?

No

These month by month plant care tasks are for plants in the following zones :
Sunset Zones : 22, 23, 24
USDA Zones : 10a, 10b
Web Link - For more information
Scroll down or click on any month for plant care instructions
  • Jan
  • Feb
  • Mar
  • Apr
  • May
  • Jun
  • Jul
  • Aug
  • Sep
  • Oct
  • Nov
  • Dec
  • January
    • Buy

        Buy bareroot when available in the nursery or from an online merchant.

    • Plant

        Plant when dormant in a light shade location that is well-draining. Plant in raised beds if the soil is heavy clay. Soil pH should be on the acidic side (6 to 6.5). Avoid planting where you grew tomatoes, eggplant, potatoes or peppers within the last three years, as these plants tend to infect the soil with verticillium wilt. Set plants 2 1/2 to 3 feet apart in rows that are 6 to 10 feet apart. Cut canes back to 4 to 6 inches high.

    • Mulch

        Maintain a 2- to 3-inch layer of shredded bark in the planting bed, which will keep the soil moist and cool.

    • Pest/Disease Inspection

        Check for signs of cane borers.

    • Treat for Pest/Disease

        Spray plants when dormant with lime sulfur to prevent fungal disease, as well as control cane borers and spider mites.

    • Special requirements

        Raspberries do best when trained on a trellis. String heavy wire between posts and train lateral side branches along wire.

  • February
    • Buy

        Buy bareroot when available in the nursery or from an online merchant.

    • Plant

        Plant when dormant in a light shade location that is well-draining. Plant in raised beds if the soil is heavy clay. Soil pH should be on the acidic side (6 to 6.5). Avoid planting where you grew tomatoes, eggplant, potatoes or peppers within the last three years, as these plants tend to infect the soil with verticillium wilt. Set plants 2 1/2 to 3 feet apart in rows that are 6 to 10 feet apart. Cut canes back to 4 to 6 inches high.

    • Mulch

        Maintain a 2- to 3-inch layer of shredded bark in the planting bed, which will keep the soil moist and cool.

    • Pest/Disease Inspection

        Check for signs of cane borers.

    • Treat for Pest/Disease

        Spray plants when dormant with lime sulfur to prevent fungal disease, as well as control cane borers and spider mites.

    • Special requirements

        Raspberries do best when trained on a trellis. String heavy wire between posts and train lateral side branches along wire.

  • March
    • Fertilize

        Feed once with an all-purpose organic 10-10-10 fertilizer.

    • Water

        Keep the soil around plants moist but not soggy. Avoid letting the soil dry out when the plant is flowering and fruiting.

    • Prune

        For summer bearing raspberries: After planting, don't prune for the first year. Once they fruit, cut the canes back to the ground. The second year, canes will develop around the crown. Prune out everything but 7 to 10 of the strongest canes and attach them to the trellis. Before new growth appears in spring, cut canes back to 5 feet, which will encourage them to grow laterally. For everbearing raspberries: The first fall, they will produce fruit on the top 1/3 of the plant. After harvest, remove the portion of the plant that produced berries and let the lower part remain to produce the spring crop. In spring, after the canes have fruited, remove them completely. New canes that appear will produce the next crop.

    • Mulch

        Maintain a 2- to 3-inch layer of shredded bark in the planting bed, which will keep the soil moist and cool.

    • Pest/Disease Inspection

        Check early in the month for signs of cane borers.

    • Treat for Pest/Disease

        Treat cane borers and spider mites with horticultural oil.

  • April
    • Fertilize

        Feed once with an all-purpose organic 10-10-10 fertilizer.

    • Water

        Keep the soil around plants moist but not soggy. Avoid letting the soil dry out when the plant is flowering and fruiting.

    • Prune

        For summer bearing raspberries: After planting, don't prune for the first year. Once they fruit, cut the canes back to the ground. The second year, canes will develop around the crown. Prune out everything but 7 to 10 of the strongest canes and attach them to the trellis. Before new growth appears in spring, cut canes back to 5 feet, which will encourage them to grow laterally. For everbearing raspberries: The first fall, they will produce fruit on the top 1/3 of the plant. After harvest, remove the portion of the plant that produced berries and let the lower part remain to produce the spring crop. In spring, after the canes have fruited, remove them completely. New canes that appear will produce the next crop.

    • Mulch

        Maintain a 2- to 3-inch layer of shredded bark in the planting bed, which will keep the soil moist and cool.

    • Pest/Disease Inspection

        Check for spider mites and signs of fungal disease.

    • Treat for Pest/Disease

        Treat cane borers and spider mites with horticultural oil.

    • Harvest

        Harvest when the fruit is bright red and sweet.

  • May
    • Fertilize

        Feed once with an all-purpose organic 10-10-10 fertilizer.

    • Water

        Keep the soil around plants moist but not soggy. Avoid letting the soil dry out when the plant is flowering and fruiting.

    • Prune

        For summer bearing raspberries: After planting, don't prune for the first year. Once they fruit, cut the canes back to the ground. The second year, canes will develop around the crown. Prune out everything but 7 to 10 of the strongest canes and attach them to the trellis. Before new growth appears in spring, cut canes back to 5 feet, which will encourage them to grow laterally. For everbearing raspberries: The first fall, they will produce fruit on the top 1/3 of the plant. After harvest, remove the portion of the plant that produced berries and let the lower part remain to produce the spring crop. In spring, after the canes have fruited, remove them completely. New canes that appear will produce the next crop.

    • Mulch

        Maintain a 2- to 3-inch layer of shredded bark in the planting bed, which will keep the soil moist and cool.

    • Pest/Disease Inspection

        Check for spider mites and signs of fungal disease.

    • Treat for Pest/Disease

        Treat cane borers and spider mites with horticultural oil.

    • Harvest

        Harvest when the fruit is bright red and sweet.

  • June
    • Water

        Keep the soil around plants moist but not soggy. Avoid letting the soil dry out when the planting is flowering and fruiting.

    • Prune

        For summer bearing raspberries: After planting, don't prune for the first year. Once they fruit, cut the canes back to the ground. The second year, canes will develop around the crown. Prune out everything but 7 to 10 of the strongest canes and attach them to the trellis. Before new growth appears in spring, cut canes back to 5 feet, which will encourage them to grow laterally. For everbearing raspberries: The first fall, they will produce fruit on the top 1/3 of the plant. After harvest, remove the portion of the plant that produced berries and let the lower part remain to produce the spring crop. In spring, after the canes have fruited, remove them completely. New canes that appear will produce the next crop.

    • Mulch

        Maintain a 2- to 3-inch layer of shredded bark in the planting bed, which will keep the soil moist and cool.

    • Pest/Disease Inspection

        Check for spider mites and signs of fungal disease.

    • Treat for Pest/Disease

        Treat cane borers and spider mites with horticultural oil.

    • Harvest

        Harvest when the fruit is bright red and sweet.

  • July
    • Water

        Keep the soil around plants moist but not soggy. Avoid letting the soil dry out when the plant is flowering and fruiting.

    • Prune

        For summer bearing raspberries: After planting, don't prune for the first year. Once they fruit, cut the canes back to the ground. The second year, canes will develop around the crown. Prune out everything but 7 to 10 of the strongest canes and attach them to the trellis. Before new growth appears in spring, cut canes back to 5 feet, which will encourage them to grow laterally. For everbearing raspberries: The first fall, they will produce fruit on the top 1/3 of the plant. After harvest, remove the portion of the plant that produced berries and let the lower part remain to produce the spring crop. In spring, after the canes have fruited, remove them completely. New canes that appear will produce the next crop.

    • Mulch

        Maintain a 2- to 3-inch layer of shredded bark in the planting bed, which will keep the soil moist and cool.

    • Pest/Disease Inspection

        Check for spider mites and signs of fungal disease.

    • Treat for Pest/Disease

        Treat cane borers and spider mites with horticultural oil.

    • Harvest

        Harvest when the fruit is bright red and sweet.

  • August
    • Water

        Keep the soil around plants moist but not soggy. Avoid letting the soil dry out when the plant is flowering and fruiting.

    • Prune

        For summer bearing raspberries: After planting, don't prune for the first year. Once they fruit, cut the canes back to the ground. The second year, canes will develop around the crown. Prune out everything but 7 to 10 of the strongest canes and attach them to the trellis. Before new growth appears in spring, cut canes back to 5 feet, which will encourage them to grow laterally. For everbearing raspberries: The first fall, they will produce fruit on the top 1/3 of the plant. After harvest, remove the portion of the plant that produced berries and let the lower part remain to produce the spring crop. In spring, after the canes have fruited, remove them completely. New canes that appear will produce the next crop.

    • Mulch

        Maintain a 2- to 3-inch layer of shredded bark in the planting bed, which will keep the soil moist and cool.

    • Pest/Disease Inspection

        Check for spider mites and signs of fungal disease.

    • Treat for Pest/Disease

        Treat cane borers and spider mites with horticultural oil.

    • Harvest

        Harvest when the fruit is bright red and sweet.

  • September
    • Water

        Keep the soil around plants moist but not soggy. Avoid letting the soil dry out when the plant is flowering and fruiting.

    • Prune

        For summer bearing raspberries: After planting, don't prune for the first year. Once they fruit, cut the canes back to the ground. The second year, canes will develop around the crown. Prune out everything but 7 to 10 of the strongest canes and attach them to the trellis. Before new growth appears in spring, cut canes back to 5 feet, which will encourage them to grow laterally. For everbearing raspberries: The first fall, they will produce fruit on the top 1/3 of the plant. After harvest, remove the portion of the plant that produced berries and let the lower part remain to produce the spring crop. In spring, after the canes have fruited, remove them completely. New canes that appear will produce the next crop.

    • Mulch

        Maintain a 2- to 3-inch layer of shredded bark in the planting bed, which will keep the soil moist and cool.

    • Pest/Disease Inspection

        Check for spider mites and signs of fungal disease.

    • Treat for Pest/Disease

        Treat cane borers and spider mites with horticultural oil.

    • Harvest

        Harvest when the fruit is bright red and sweet.

  • October
    • Water

        Keep the soil around plants moist but not soggy. Avoid letting the soil dry out when the plant is flowering and fruiting.

    • Prune

        For summer bearing raspberries: After planting, don't prune for the first year. Once they fruit, cut the canes back to the ground. The second year, canes will develop around the crown. Prune out everything but 7 to 10 of the strongest canes and attach them to the trellis. Before new growth appears in spring, cut canes back to 5 feet, which will encourage them to grow laterally. For everbearing raspberries: The first fall, they will produce fruit on the top 1/3 of the plant. After harvest, remove the portion of the plant that produced berries and let the lower part remain to produce the spring crop. In spring, after the canes have fruited, remove them completely. New canes that appear will produce the next crop.

    • Mulch

        Maintain a 2- to 3-inch layer of shredded bark in the planting bed, which will keep the soil moist and cool.

    • Pest/Disease Inspection

        Check for spider mites and signs of fungal disease.

    • Treat for Pest/Disease

        Treat cane borers and spider mites with horticultural oil.

  • November
    • Mulch

        Maintain a 2- to 3-inch layer of shredded bark in the planting bed, which will keep the soil moist and cool.

    • Pest/Disease Inspection

        Check for signs of cane borers.

    • Treat for Pest/Disease

        Treat cane borers and spider mites with horticultural oil.

  • December
    • Buy

        Buy bareroot when available in the nursery or from an online merchant.

    • Plant

        Plant when dormant in a light shade location that is well-draining. Plant in raised beds if the soil is heavy clay. Soil pH should be on the acidic side (6 to 6.5). Avoid planting where you grew tomatoes, eggplant, potatoes or peppers within the last three years, as these plants tend to infect the soil with verticillium wilt. Set plants 2 1/2 to 3 feet apart in rows that are 6 to 10 feet apart. Cut canes back to 4 to 6 inches high.

    • Mulch

        Maintain a 2- to 3-inch layer of shredded bark in the planting bed, which will keep the soil moist and cool.

    • Pest/Disease Inspection

        Check for signs of cane borers.

    • Treat for Pest/Disease

        Spray plants when dormant with lime sulfur to prevent fungal disease, as well as control cane borers and spider mites.

    • Special requirements

        Raspberries do best when trained on a trellis. String heavy wire between posts and train lateral side branches along wire.

  • Winter
    • Spring
      • Summer
        • Fall
          • Buy

            When's the best time to buy this plant? When can you buy these from seed (if you can)? When is it usually available? What are things to look for when you're buying it? Or anything other tidbit of information you can share!

            •  Jan
            •  Feb
            •  Mar
            •  Apr
            •  May
            •  Jun
            •  Jul
            •  Aug
            •  Sep
            •  Oct
            •  Nov
            •  Dec
            • January

              Buy bareroot when available in the nursery or from an online merchant.

            • February

              Buy bareroot when available in the nursery or from an online merchant.

            • December

              Buy bareroot when available in the nursery or from an online merchant.

          • Plant

            When's a good time to plant this plant or bulb? Any special planting instructions?

            •  Jan
            •  Feb
            •  Mar
            •  Apr
            •  May
            •  Jun
            •  Jul
            •  Aug
            •  Sep
            •  Oct
            •  Nov
            •  Dec
            • January

              Plant when dormant in a light shade location that is well-draining. Plant in raised beds if the soil is heavy clay. Soil pH should be on the acidic side (6 to 6.5). Avoid planting where you grew tomatoes, eggplant, potatoes or peppers within the last three years, as these plants tend to infect the soil with verticillium wilt. Set plants 2 1/2 to 3 feet apart in rows that are 6 to 10 feet apart. Cut canes back to 4 to 6 inches high.

            • February

              Plant when dormant in a light shade location that is well-draining. Plant in raised beds if the soil is heavy clay. Soil pH should be on the acidic side (6 to 6.5). Avoid planting where you grew tomatoes, eggplant, potatoes or peppers within the last three years, as these plants tend to infect the soil with verticillium wilt. Set plants 2 1/2 to 3 feet apart in rows that are 6 to 10 feet apart. Cut canes back to 4 to 6 inches high.

            • December

              Plant when dormant in a light shade location that is well-draining. Plant in raised beds if the soil is heavy clay. Soil pH should be on the acidic side (6 to 6.5). Avoid planting where you grew tomatoes, eggplant, potatoes or peppers within the last three years, as these plants tend to infect the soil with verticillium wilt. Set plants 2 1/2 to 3 feet apart in rows that are 6 to 10 feet apart. Cut canes back to 4 to 6 inches high.

          • Sow Seeds

            When can you plant these seeds? When's the best time? Can you start them indoors and move them out? Do they have any special requirements?

            •  Jan
            •  Feb
            •  Mar
            •  Apr
            •  May
            •  Jun
            •  Jul
            •  Aug
            •  Sep
            •  Oct
            •  Nov
            •  Dec
            • Fertilize

              When should you fertilize this plant? Which kind of fertilizer do you recommend? Should you use different fertilizers at different times of year?

              •  Jan
              •  Feb
              •  Mar
              •  Apr
              •  May
              •  Jun
              •  Jul
              •  Aug
              •  Sep
              •  Oct
              •  Nov
              •  Dec
              • March

                Feed once with an all-purpose organic 10-10-10 fertilizer.

              • April

                Feed once with an all-purpose organic 10-10-10 fertilizer.

              • May

                Feed once with an all-purpose organic 10-10-10 fertilizer.

            • Water

              Is there a time to reduce or increase watering? Any special requirements? Things to avoid during certain times of the year?

              •  Jan
              •  Feb
              •  Mar
              •  Apr
              •  May
              •  Jun
              •  Jul
              •  Aug
              •  Sep
              •  Oct
              •  Nov
              •  Dec
              • March

                Keep the soil around plants moist but not soggy. Avoid letting the soil dry out when the plant is flowering and fruiting.

              • April

                Keep the soil around plants moist but not soggy. Avoid letting the soil dry out when the plant is flowering and fruiting.

              • May

                Keep the soil around plants moist but not soggy. Avoid letting the soil dry out when the plant is flowering and fruiting.

              • June

                Keep the soil around plants moist but not soggy. Avoid letting the soil dry out when the planting is flowering and fruiting.

              • July

                Keep the soil around plants moist but not soggy. Avoid letting the soil dry out when the plant is flowering and fruiting.

              • August

                Keep the soil around plants moist but not soggy. Avoid letting the soil dry out when the plant is flowering and fruiting.

              • September

                Keep the soil around plants moist but not soggy. Avoid letting the soil dry out when the plant is flowering and fruiting.

              • October

                Keep the soil around plants moist but not soggy. Avoid letting the soil dry out when the plant is flowering and fruiting.

            • Prune

              When's a good time to prune this plant? How about deadheading, pinching back, trimming or any other grooming? Any special requirements?

              •  Jan
              •  Feb
              •  Mar
              •  Apr
              •  May
              •  Jun
              •  Jul
              •  Aug
              •  Sep
              •  Oct
              •  Nov
              •  Dec
              • March

                For summer bearing raspberries: After planting, don't prune for the first year. Once they fruit, cut the canes back to the ground. The second year, canes will develop around the crown. Prune out everything but 7 to 10 of the strongest canes and attach them to the trellis. Before new growth appears in spring, cut canes back to 5 feet, which will encourage them to grow laterally. For everbearing raspberries: The first fall, they will produce fruit on the top 1/3 of the plant. After harvest, remove the portion of the plant that produced berries and let the lower part remain to produce the spring crop. In spring, after the canes have fruited, remove them completely. New canes that appear will produce the next crop.

              • April

                For summer bearing raspberries: After planting, don't prune for the first year. Once they fruit, cut the canes back to the ground. The second year, canes will develop around the crown. Prune out everything but 7 to 10 of the strongest canes and attach them to the trellis. Before new growth appears in spring, cut canes back to 5 feet, which will encourage them to grow laterally. For everbearing raspberries: The first fall, they will produce fruit on the top 1/3 of the plant. After harvest, remove the portion of the plant that produced berries and let the lower part remain to produce the spring crop. In spring, after the canes have fruited, remove them completely. New canes that appear will produce the next crop.

              • May

                For summer bearing raspberries: After planting, don't prune for the first year. Once they fruit, cut the canes back to the ground. The second year, canes will develop around the crown. Prune out everything but 7 to 10 of the strongest canes and attach them to the trellis. Before new growth appears in spring, cut canes back to 5 feet, which will encourage them to grow laterally. For everbearing raspberries: The first fall, they will produce fruit on the top 1/3 of the plant. After harvest, remove the portion of the plant that produced berries and let the lower part remain to produce the spring crop. In spring, after the canes have fruited, remove them completely. New canes that appear will produce the next crop.

              • June

                For summer bearing raspberries: After planting, don't prune for the first year. Once they fruit, cut the canes back to the ground. The second year, canes will develop around the crown. Prune out everything but 7 to 10 of the strongest canes and attach them to the trellis. Before new growth appears in spring, cut canes back to 5 feet, which will encourage them to grow laterally. For everbearing raspberries: The first fall, they will produce fruit on the top 1/3 of the plant. After harvest, remove the portion of the plant that produced berries and let the lower part remain to produce the spring crop. In spring, after the canes have fruited, remove them completely. New canes that appear will produce the next crop.

              • July

                For summer bearing raspberries: After planting, don't prune for the first year. Once they fruit, cut the canes back to the ground. The second year, canes will develop around the crown. Prune out everything but 7 to 10 of the strongest canes and attach them to the trellis. Before new growth appears in spring, cut canes back to 5 feet, which will encourage them to grow laterally. For everbearing raspberries: The first fall, they will produce fruit on the top 1/3 of the plant. After harvest, remove the portion of the plant that produced berries and let the lower part remain to produce the spring crop. In spring, after the canes have fruited, remove them completely. New canes that appear will produce the next crop.

              • August

                For summer bearing raspberries: After planting, don't prune for the first year. Once they fruit, cut the canes back to the ground. The second year, canes will develop around the crown. Prune out everything but 7 to 10 of the strongest canes and attach them to the trellis. Before new growth appears in spring, cut canes back to 5 feet, which will encourage them to grow laterally. For everbearing raspberries: The first fall, they will produce fruit on the top 1/3 of the plant. After harvest, remove the portion of the plant that produced berries and let the lower part remain to produce the spring crop. In spring, after the canes have fruited, remove them completely. New canes that appear will produce the next crop.

              • September

                For summer bearing raspberries: After planting, don't prune for the first year. Once they fruit, cut the canes back to the ground. The second year, canes will develop around the crown. Prune out everything but 7 to 10 of the strongest canes and attach them to the trellis. Before new growth appears in spring, cut canes back to 5 feet, which will encourage them to grow laterally. For everbearing raspberries: The first fall, they will produce fruit on the top 1/3 of the plant. After harvest, remove the portion of the plant that produced berries and let the lower part remain to produce the spring crop. In spring, after the canes have fruited, remove them completely. New canes that appear will produce the next crop.

              • October

                For summer bearing raspberries: After planting, don't prune for the first year. Once they fruit, cut the canes back to the ground. The second year, canes will develop around the crown. Prune out everything but 7 to 10 of the strongest canes and attach them to the trellis. Before new growth appears in spring, cut canes back to 5 feet, which will encourage them to grow laterally. For everbearing raspberries: The first fall, they will produce fruit on the top 1/3 of the plant. After harvest, remove the portion of the plant that produced berries and let the lower part remain to produce the spring crop. In spring, after the canes have fruited, remove them completely. New canes that appear will produce the next crop.

            • Mulch

              Does this plant need to be mulched? Are there specific types of Mulch which are better for this plant? How much?

              •  Jan
              •  Feb
              •  Mar
              •  Apr
              •  May
              •  Jun
              •  Jul
              •  Aug
              •  Sep
              •  Oct
              •  Nov
              •  Dec
              • January

                Maintain a 2- to 3-inch layer of shredded bark in the planting bed, which will keep the soil moist and cool.

              • February

                Maintain a 2- to 3-inch layer of shredded bark in the planting bed, which will keep the soil moist and cool.

              • March

                Maintain a 2- to 3-inch layer of shredded bark in the planting bed, which will keep the soil moist and cool.

              • April

                Maintain a 2- to 3-inch layer of shredded bark in the planting bed, which will keep the soil moist and cool.

              • May

                Maintain a 2- to 3-inch layer of shredded bark in the planting bed, which will keep the soil moist and cool.

              • June

                Maintain a 2- to 3-inch layer of shredded bark in the planting bed, which will keep the soil moist and cool.

              • July

                Maintain a 2- to 3-inch layer of shredded bark in the planting bed, which will keep the soil moist and cool.

              • August

                Maintain a 2- to 3-inch layer of shredded bark in the planting bed, which will keep the soil moist and cool.

              • September

                Maintain a 2- to 3-inch layer of shredded bark in the planting bed, which will keep the soil moist and cool.

              • October

                Maintain a 2- to 3-inch layer of shredded bark in the planting bed, which will keep the soil moist and cool.

              • November

                Maintain a 2- to 3-inch layer of shredded bark in the planting bed, which will keep the soil moist and cool.

              • December

                Maintain a 2- to 3-inch layer of shredded bark in the planting bed, which will keep the soil moist and cool.

            • Protect

              When and how should you protect this plant from birds, deer, rabbits? Does this plant need be covered, or wrapped or painted or moved?

              •  Jan
              •  Feb
              •  Mar
              •  Apr
              •  May
              •  Jun
              •  Jul
              •  Aug
              •  Sep
              •  Oct
              •  Nov
              •  Dec
              • Pest/Disease Inspection

                What are the common problems this plant will face and when should you look for them to appear?

                •  Jan
                •  Feb
                •  Mar
                •  Apr
                •  May
                •  Jun
                •  Jul
                •  Aug
                •  Sep
                •  Oct
                •  Nov
                •  Dec
                • January

                  Check for signs of cane borers.

                • February

                  Check for signs of cane borers.

                • March

                  Check early in the month for signs of cane borers.

                • April

                  Check for spider mites and signs of fungal disease.

                • May

                  Check for spider mites and signs of fungal disease.

                • June

                  Check for spider mites and signs of fungal disease.

                • July

                  Check for spider mites and signs of fungal disease.

                • August

                  Check for spider mites and signs of fungal disease.

                • September

                  Check for spider mites and signs of fungal disease.

                • October

                  Check for spider mites and signs of fungal disease.

                • November

                  Check for signs of cane borers.

                • December

                  Check for signs of cane borers.

              • Treat for Pest/Disease

                How do you treat the common problems for this plant? What products or concoctions or natural means do you use? Any special requirements?

                •  Jan
                •  Feb
                •  Mar
                •  Apr
                •  May
                •  Jun
                •  Jul
                •  Aug
                •  Sep
                •  Oct
                •  Nov
                •  Dec
                • January

                  Spray plants when dormant with lime sulfur to prevent fungal disease, as well as control cane borers and spider mites.

                • February

                  Spray plants when dormant with lime sulfur to prevent fungal disease, as well as control cane borers and spider mites.

                • March

                  Treat cane borers and spider mites with horticultural oil.

                • April

                  Treat cane borers and spider mites with horticultural oil.

                • May

                  Treat cane borers and spider mites with horticultural oil.

                • June

                  Treat cane borers and spider mites with horticultural oil.

                • July

                  Treat cane borers and spider mites with horticultural oil.

                • August

                  Treat cane borers and spider mites with horticultural oil.

                • September

                  Treat cane borers and spider mites with horticultural oil.

                • October

                  Treat cane borers and spider mites with horticultural oil.

                • November

                  Treat cane borers and spider mites with horticultural oil.

                • December

                  Spray plants when dormant with lime sulfur to prevent fungal disease, as well as control cane borers and spider mites.

              • Transplant

                When's the best time to dig up and transplant this from one spot to another? (This is different than planting). Any special requirements?

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                • Propagate

                  When's a good time to divide, take cuttings, layer or propagate this plant. Any special requirements?

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                  • Harvest

                    When's a good time to harvest this plant? What's the best way to harvest? Are there special requirements or features?

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                    • April

                      Harvest when the fruit is bright red and sweet.

                    • May

                      Harvest when the fruit is bright red and sweet.

                    • June

                      Harvest when the fruit is bright red and sweet.

                    • July

                      Harvest when the fruit is bright red and sweet.

                    • August

                      Harvest when the fruit is bright red and sweet.

                    • September

                      Harvest when the fruit is bright red and sweet.

                  • Special requirements

                    Any other requirement for this plant? Is there anything that doesn't fit into the other care categories?

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                    • January

                      Raspberries do best when trained on a trellis. String heavy wire between posts and train lateral side branches along wire.

                    • February

                      Raspberries do best when trained on a trellis. String heavy wire between posts and train lateral side branches along wire.

                    • December

                      Raspberries do best when trained on a trellis. String heavy wire between posts and train lateral side branches along wire.

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