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Garden strawberry
Plant Care Instructions By Julie Bawden-Davis

This plant produces the popular strawberry fruit that we all know. A wide variety of cultivars exist and there are two main types--June bearing and everbearing. The mild weather found in this zone allows you to plant and grow everbearing strawberries throughout the year. Strawberries can be grown in the ground and containers.

Is Indoor Plant?

No

These month by month plant care tasks are for plants in the following zones :
Sunset Zones : 22, 23, 24
USDA Zones : 10a, 10b
Web Link - For more information
Scroll down or click on any month for plant care instructions
  • Jan
  • Feb
  • Mar
  • Apr
  • May
  • Jun
  • Jul
  • Aug
  • Sep
  • Oct
  • Nov
  • Dec
  • January
    • Buy

        Buy bareroot plants when available in the nursery or via mail-order.

    • Plant

        Plant in the ground in a full-sun location with excellent drainage in soil that is on the acidic side (5.8-6.5 pH). Eastern or southern exposures are ideal. Western exposures are suitable, except for hot summer and fall months, at which point the plants will require some shade. Two weeks prior to planting, acidify the soil by amending with soil sulfur according to package directions, and break up heavy clay soil by amending with homemade or bagged compost and pumice. Amending with gypsum is also beneficial, as this is a combination of sulfur and gypsum, the latter of which breaks up clay soil. Plant in containers in a high-quality organic potting soil and place in a full sun location. Most potting soils are neutral or slightly on the acidic side, so amending with soil sulfur at this point generally isn't necessary. The appropriate fertilizer will add sufficient acidity to the soil.

    • Water

        In the absence of rainfall, water in-ground plants when the top 1-2 inches of soil has dried out. Water container plants once or twice a week when the top 1-2 inches of soil has dried out.

    • Pest/Disease Inspection

        Check plants for signs of verticillium wilt, as well as snails and slugs.

    • Treat for Pest/Disease

        Apply a sulfur-based fungicide for verticillium wilt. Prevent infection of this fungal pathogen by not planting strawberries in areas where plants from the Solanaeae family have grown within the last three years, such as tomato, potato, pepper and eggplant. Manually remove snails and slugs and destroy them. Prevent snails and slugs from getting to the fruit by mulching with pine needles, which are serrated and hurt the sticky feet of snails and slugs.

    • Transplant

        Transplant in the ground in a full-sun location with excellent drainage in soil that is on the acidic side (5.8-6.5 pH). Eastern or southern exposures are ideal. Western exposures are suitable, except for hot summer and fall months, at which point the plants will require some shade. Two weeks prior to planting, acidify the soil by amending with soil sulfur according to package directions, and break up heavy clay soil by amending with homemade or bagged compost and pumice. Amending with gypsum is also beneficial, as this is a combination of sulfur and gypsum, the latter of which breaks up clay soil. Transplant in containers in a high-quality organic potting soil and place in a full sun location. Most potting soils are neutral or slightly on the acidic side, so amending with soil sulfur at this point generally isn't necessary. The appropriate fertilizer will add sufficient acidity to the soil.

    • Harvest

        Everbearing strawberries, such as Seascape, can be harvested this month and every month of the year.

  • February
    • Buy

        Buy bareroot plants and transplants when available in the nursery or via mail-order.

    • Plant

        Plant in the ground in a full-sun location with excellent drainage in soil that is on the acidic side (5.8-6.5 pH). Eastern or southern exposures are ideal. Western exposures are suitable, except for hot summer and fall months, at which point the plants will require some shade. Two weeks prior to planting, acidify the soil by amending with soil sulfur according to package directions, and break up heavy clay soil by amending with homemade or bagged compost and pumice. Amending with gypsum is also beneficial, as this is a combination of sulfur and gypsum, the latter of which breaks up clay soil. Plant in containers in a high-quality organic potting soil and place in a full sun location. Most potting soils are neutral or slightly on the acidic side, so amending with soil sulfur at this point generally isn't necessary. The appropriate fertilizer will add sufficient acidity to the soil.

    • Fertilize

        Feed with a fertilizer designed for acid-loving, fruiting plants once this month.

    • Water

        In the absence of rainfall, water in-ground plants when the top 1-2 inches of soil has dried out. Water container plants once or twice a week when the top 1-2 inches of soil has dried out.

    • Pest/Disease Inspection

        Check plants for signs of verticillium wilt, as well as snails and slugs.

    • Treat for Pest/Disease

        Apply a sulfur-based fungicide for verticillium wilt. Prevent infection of this fungal pathogen by not planting strawberries in areas where plants from the Solanaeae family have grown within the last three years, such as tomato, potato, pepper and eggplant. Manually remove snails and slugs and destroy them. Prevent snails and slugs from getting to the fruit by mulching with pine needles, which are serrated and hurt the sticky feet of snails and slugs.

    • Transplant

        Transplant in the ground in a full-sun location with excellent drainage in soil that is on the acidic side (5.8-6.5 pH). Eastern or southern exposures are ideal. Western exposures are suitable, except for hot summer and fall months, at which point the plants will require some shade. Two weeks prior to planting, acidify the soil by amending with soil sulfur according to package directions, and break up heavy clay soil by amending with homemade or bagged compost and pumice. Amending with gypsum is also beneficial, as this is a combination of sulfur and gypsum, the latter of which breaks up clay soil. Transplant in containers in a high-quality organic potting soil and place in a full sun location. Most potting soils are neutral or slightly on the acidic side, so amending with soil sulfur at this point generally isn't necessary. The appropriate fertilizer will add sufficient acidity to the soil.

    • Harvest

        Everbearing strawberries, such as Seascape, can be harvested this month and every month of the year.

  • March
    • Buy

        Buy transplants when available in the nursery or via mail-order.

    • Plant

        Plant in the ground in a full-sun location with excellent drainage in soil that is on the acidic side (5.8-6.5 pH). Eastern or southern exposures are ideal. Western exposures are suitable, except for hot summer and fall months, at which point the plants will require some shade. Two weeks prior to planting, acidify the soil by amending with soil sulfur according to package directions, and break up heavy clay soil by amending with homemade or bagged compost and pumice. Amending with gypsum is also beneficial, as this is a combination of sulfur and gypsum, the latter of which breaks up clay soil. Plant in containers in a high-quality organic potting soil and place in a full sun location. Most potting soils are neutral or slightly on the acidic side, so amending with soil sulfur at this point generally isn't necessary. The appropriate fertilizer will add sufficient acidity to the soil.

    • Fertilize

        Feed with a fertilizer designed for acid-loving, fruiting plants once this month.

    • Water

        In the absence of rainfall, water in-ground plants when the top 1-2 inches of soil has dried out. Water container plants twice a week when the top 1-2 inches of soil has dried out.

    • Pest/Disease Inspection

        Check plants for signs of verticillium wilt, as well as snails and slugs.

    • Treat for Pest/Disease

        Apply a sulfur-based fungicide for verticillium wilt. Prevent infection of this fungal pathogen by not planting strawberries in areas where plants from the Solanaeae family have grown within the last three years, such as tomato, potato, pepper and eggplant. Manually remove snails and slugs and destroy them. Prevent snails and slugs from getting to the fruit by mulching with pine needles, which are serrated and hurt the sticky feet of snails and slugs.

    • Transplant

        Transplant in the ground in a full-sun location with excellent drainage in soil that is on the acidic side (5.8-6.5 pH). Eastern or southern exposures are ideal. Western exposures are suitable, except for hot summer and fall months, at which point the plants will require some shade. Two weeks prior to planting, acidify the soil by amending with soil sulfur according to package directions, and break up heavy clay soil by amending with homemade or bagged compost and pumice. Amending with gypsum is also beneficial, as this is a combination of sulfur and gypsum, the latter of which breaks up clay soil. Transplant in containers in a high-quality organic potting soil and place in a full sun location. Most potting soils are neutral or slightly on the acidic side, so amending with soil sulfur at this point generally isn't necessary. The appropriate fertilizer will add sufficient acidity to the soil.

    • Harvest

        Everbearing strawberries, such as Seascape, can be harvested this month and every month of the year.

  • April
    • Buy

        Buy transplants when available in the nursery or via mail-order.

    • Plant

        Plant in the ground in a full-sun location with excellent drainage in soil that is on the acidic side (5.8-6.5 pH). Eastern or southern exposures are ideal. Western exposures are suitable, except for hot summer and fall months, at which point the plants will require some shade. Two weeks prior to planting, acidify the soil by amending with soil sulfur according to package directions, and break up heavy clay soil by amending with homemade or bagged compost and pumice. Amending with gypsum is also beneficial, as this is a combination of sulfur and gypsum, the latter of which breaks up clay soil. Plant in containers in a high-quality organic potting soil and place in a full sun location. Most potting soils are neutral or slightly on the acidic side, so amending with soil sulfur at this point generally isn't necessary. The appropriate fertilizer will add sufficient acidity to the soil.

    • Fertilize

        Feed with a fertilizer designed for acid-loving, fruiting plants once this month.

    • Water

        Water in-ground plants when the top 1-2 inches of soil has dried out. Water container plants three times a week when the top 1-2 inches of soil has dried out.

    • Mulch

        Keep fruit off the soil and maintain even soil temperature and moisture by maintaining a 1-2 inch layer of mulch around the base of the plants. Pine needles are an ideal mulch, as they keep the strawberries away from soil, discourage pests and slowly break down to acidify the soil.

    • Pest/Disease Inspection

        Check plants for signs of verticillium wilt, snails and slugs and aphids.

    • Treat for Pest/Disease

        Apply a sulfur-based fungicide for verticillium wilt. Prevent infection of this fungal pathogen by not planting strawberries in areas where plants from the Solanaeae family have grown within the last three years, such as tomato, potato, pepper and eggplant. Manually remove snails and slugs and destroy them. Prevent snails and slugs from getting to the fruit by mulching with pine needles, which are serrated and hurt the sticky feet of snails and slugs. Remove aphids with a strong spray of water. Repeat as necessary until they are gone.

    • Transplant

        Transplant in the ground in a full-sun location with excellent drainage in soil that is on the acidic side (5.8-6.5 pH). Eastern or southern exposures are ideal. Western exposures are suitable, except for hot summer and fall months, at which point the plants will require some shade. Two weeks prior to planting, acidify the soil by amending with soil sulfur according to package directions, and break up heavy clay soil by amending with homemade or bagged compost and pumice. Amending with gypsum is also beneficial, as this is a combination of sulfur and gypsum, the latter of which breaks up clay soil. Transplant in containers in a high-quality organic potting soil and place in a full sun location. Most potting soils are neutral or slightly on the acidic side, so amending with soil sulfur at this point generally isn't necessary. The appropriate fertilizer will add sufficient acidity to the soil.

    • Harvest

        Everbearing strawberries, such as Seascape, can be harvested this month and every month of the year. June-bearing strawberries can generally be harvested starting late this month.

  • May
    • Buy

        Buy transplants when available in the nursery or via mail-order.

    • Plant

        Plant in the ground in a full-sun location with excellent drainage in soil that is on the acidic side (5.8-6.5 pH). Eastern or southern exposures are ideal. Western exposures are suitable, except for hot summer and fall months, at which point the plants will require some shade. Two weeks prior to planting, acidify the soil by amending with soil sulfur according to package directions, and break up heavy clay soil by amending with homemade or bagged compost and pumice. Amending with gypsum is also beneficial, as this is a combination of sulfur and gypsum, the latter of which breaks up clay soil. Plant in containers in a high-quality organic potting soil and place in a full sun location. Most potting soils are neutral or slightly on the acidic side, so amending with soil sulfur at this point generally isn't necessary. The appropriate fertilizer will add sufficient acidity to the soil.

    • Fertilize

        Feed with a fertilizer designed for acid-loving, fruiting plants once this month.

    • Water

        Water in-ground plants when the top 1-2 inches of soil has dried out. Water container plants three times a week when the top 1-2 inches of soil has dried out.

    • Mulch

        Keep fruit off the soil and maintain even soil temperature and moisture by maintaining a 1-2 inch layer of mulch around the base of the plants. Pine needles are an ideal mulch, as they keep the strawberries away from soil, discourage pests and slowly break down to acidify the soil.

    • Pest/Disease Inspection

        Check plants for signs of verticillium wilt, snails and slugs and aphids.

    • Treat for Pest/Disease

        Apply a sulfur-based fungicide for verticillium wilt. Prevent infection of this fungal pathogen by not planting strawberries in areas where plants from the Solanaeae family have grown within the last three years, such as tomato, potato, pepper and eggplant. Manually remove snails and slugs and destroy them. Prevent snails and slugs from getting to the fruit by mulching with pine needles, which are serrated and hurt the sticky feet of snails and slugs. Remove aphids with a strong spray of water. Repeat as necessary until they are gone.

    • Transplant

        Transplant in the ground in a full-sun location with excellent drainage in soil that is on the acidic side (5.8-6.5 pH). Eastern or southern exposures are ideal. Western exposures are suitable, except for hot summer and fall months, at which point the plants will require some shade. Two weeks prior to planting, acidify the soil by amending with soil sulfur according to package directions, and break up heavy clay soil by amending with homemade or bagged compost and pumice. Amending with gypsum is also beneficial, as this is a combination of sulfur and gypsum, the latter of which breaks up clay soil. Transplant in containers in a high-quality organic potting soil and place in a full sun location. Most potting soils are neutral or slightly on the acidic side, so amending with soil sulfur at this point generally isn't necessary. The appropriate fertilizer will add sufficient acidity to the soil.

    • Harvest

        Everbearing strawberries, such as Seascape, can be harvested this month and every month of the year. June-bearing strawberries can generally be harvested this month.

  • June
    • Buy

        Buy transplants when available in the nursery.

    • Plant

        Plant in the ground in a full-sun location with excellent drainage in soil that is on the acidic side (5.8-6.5 pH). Eastern or southern exposures are ideal. Western exposures are suitable, except for hot summer and fall months, at which point the plants will require some shade. Two weeks prior to planting, acidify the soil by amending with soil sulfur according to package directions, and break up heavy clay soil by amending with homemade or bagged compost and pumice. Amending with gypsum is also beneficial, as this is a combination of sulfur and gypsum, the latter of which breaks up clay soil. Plant in containers in a high-quality organic potting soil and place in a full sun location. Most potting soils are neutral or slightly on the acidic side, so amending with soil sulfur at this point generally isn't necessary. The appropriate fertilizer will add sufficient acidity to the soil.

    • Fertilize

        Feed with a fertilizer designed for acid-loving, fruiting plants once this month.

    • Water

        Water in-ground plants when the top 1-2 inches of soil has dried out. Water container plants four times a week when the top 1-2 inches of soil has dried out.

    • Mulch

        Keep fruit off the soil and maintain even soil temperature and moisture by maintaining a 1-2 inch layer of mulch around the base of the plants. Pine needles are an ideal mulch, as they keep the strawberries away from soil, discourage pests and slowly break down to acidify the soil.

    • Pest/Disease Inspection

        Check plants for signs of verticillium wilt, snails and slugs and aphids.

    • Treat for Pest/Disease

        Apply a sulfur-based fungicide for verticillium wilt. Prevent infection of this fungal pathogen by not planting strawberries in areas where plants from the Solanaeae family have grown within the last three years, such as tomato, potato, pepper and eggplant. Manually remove snails and slugs and destroy them. Prevent snails and slugs from getting to the fruit by mulching with pine needles, which are serrated and hurt the sticky feet of snails and slugs. Remove aphids with a strong spray of water. Repeat as necessary until they are gone.

    • Transplant

        Transplant in the ground in a full-sun location with excellent drainage in soil that is on the acidic side (5.8-6.5 pH). Eastern or southern exposures are ideal. Western exposures are suitable, except for hot summer and fall months, at which point the plants will require some shade. Two weeks prior to planting, acidify the soil by amending with soil sulfur according to package directions, and break up heavy clay soil by amending with homemade or bagged compost and pumice. Amending with gypsum is also beneficial, as this is a combination of sulfur and gypsum, the latter of which breaks up clay soil. Transplant in containers in a high-quality organic potting soil and place in a full sun location. Most potting soils are neutral or slightly on the acidic side, so amending with soil sulfur at this point generally isn't necessary. The appropriate fertilizer will add sufficient acidity to the soil.

    • Harvest

        Everbearing strawberries, such as Seascape, can be harvested this month and every month of the year. June-bearing strawberries generally can be harvested this month.

  • July
    • Fertilize

        Feed with a fertilizer designed for acid-loving, fruiting plants once this month.

    • Water

        Water in-ground plants when the top 1-2 inches of soil has dried out. Water container plants daily when the top 1-2 inches of soil has dried out.

    • Mulch

        Keep fruit off the soil and maintain even soil temperature and moisture by maintaining a 1-2 inch layer of mulch around the base of the plants. Pine needles are an ideal mulch, as they keep the strawberries away from soil, discourage pests and slowly break down to acidify the soil.

    • Pest/Disease Inspection

        Check plants for signs of verticillium wilt, snails and slugs and aphids.

    • Treat for Pest/Disease

        Apply a sulfur-based fungicide for verticillium wilt. Prevent infection of this fungal pathogen by not planting strawberries in areas where plants from the Solanaeae family have grown within the last three years, such as tomato, potato, pepper and eggplant. Manually remove snails and slugs and destroy them. Prevent snails and slugs from getting to the fruit by mulching with pine needles, which are serrated and hurt the sticky feet of snails and slugs. Remove aphids with a strong spray of water. Repeat as necessary until they are gone.

    • Transplant

        Transplant in the ground in a full-sun location with excellent drainage in soil that is on the acidic side (5.8-6.5 pH). Eastern or southern exposures are ideal. Western exposures are suitable, except for hot summer and fall months, at which point the plants will require some shade. Two weeks prior to planting, acidify the soil by amending with soil sulfur according to package directions, and break up heavy clay soil by amending with homemade or bagged compost and pumice. Amending with gypsum is also beneficial, as this is a combination of sulfur and gypsum, the latter of which breaks up clay soil. Transplant in containers in a high-quality organic potting soil and place in a full sun location. Most potting soils are neutral or slightly on the acidic side, so amending with soil sulfur at this point generally isn't necessary. The appropriate fertilizer will add sufficient acidity to the soil.

    • Propagate

        June-bearing strawberries, such as Sequoia, begin sending out runners this month. The runners, which are long stems with leaves and a growth tip at the end, extend from existing "mother" plants. These growth tips will eventually root and create new plants. Help the process along when you see the growth tips by rooting them in surrounding soil or small pots. After 2 to 3 weeks, the new plants will have rooted--at which point you can cut them from the mother plant.

    • Harvest

        Everbearing strawberries, such as Seascape, can be harvested this month and every month of the year.

    • Special requirements

        If you wish to have a strong crop of June-bearing strawberries to plant for next year, rather than severing runners from the mother plants when they root, let them continue to grow attached.

  • August
    • Fertilize

        Feed with a fertilizer designed for acid-loving, fruiting plants once this month.

    • Water

        Water in-ground plants when the top 1-2 inches of soil has dried out. Water container plants daily when the top 1-2 inches of soil has dried out.

    • Mulch

        Keep fruit off the soil and maintain even soil temperature and moisture by maintaining a 1-2 inch layer of mulch around the base of the plants. Pine needles are an ideal mulch, as they keep the strawberries away from soil, discourage pests and slowly break down to acidify the soil.

    • Pest/Disease Inspection

        Check plants for signs of verticillium wilt, snails and slugs and aphids.

    • Treat for Pest/Disease

        Apply a sulfur-based fungicide for verticillium wilt. Prevent infection of this fungal pathogen by not planting strawberries in areas where plants from the Solanaeae family have grown within the last three years, such as tomato, potato, pepper and eggplant. Manually remove snails and slugs and destroy them. Prevent snails and slugs from getting to the fruit by mulching with pine needles, which are serrated and hurt the sticky feet of snails and slugs. Remove aphids with a strong spray of water. Repeat as necessary until they are gone.

    • Transplant

        Transplant in the ground in a full-sun location with excellent drainage in soil that is on the acidic side (5.8-6.5 pH). Eastern or southern exposures are ideal. Western exposures are suitable, except for hot summer and fall months, at which point the plants will require some shade. Two weeks prior to planting, acidify the soil by amending with soil sulfur according to package directions, and break up heavy clay soil by amending with homemade or bagged compost and pumice. Amending with gypsum is also beneficial, as this is a combination of sulfur and gypsum, the latter of which breaks up clay soil. Transplant in containers in a high-quality organic potting soil and place in a full sun location. Most potting soils are neutral or slightly on the acidic side, so amending with soil sulfur at this point generally isn't necessary. The appropriate fertilizer will add sufficient acidity to the soil.

    • Propagate

        June-bearing strawberries, such as Sequoia, will continue sending out runners this month. The runners, which are long stems with leaves and a growth tip at the end, extend from existing "mother" plants. These growth tips will eventually root and create new plants. Help the process along when you see the growth tips by rooting them in surrounding soil or small pots. After 2 to 3 weeks, the new plants will have rooted--at which point you can cut them from the mother plant.

    • Harvest

        Everbearing strawberries, such as Seascape, can be harvested this month and every month of the year.

    • Special requirements

        If you wish to have a strong crop of June-bearing strawberries to plant for next year, rather than severing runners from the mother plants when they root, let them continue to grow attached.

  • September
    • Fertilize

        Feed with a fertilizer designed for acid-loving, fruiting plants once this month.

    • Water

        Water in-ground plants when the top 1-2 inches of soil has dried out. Water container plants daily when the top 1-2 inches of soil has dried out.

    • Mulch

        Keep fruit off the soil and maintain even soil temperature and moisture by maintaining a 1-2 inch layer of mulch around the base of the plants. Pine needles are an ideal mulch, as they keep the strawberries away from soil, discourage pests and slowly break down to acidify the soil.

    • Pest/Disease Inspection

        Check plants for signs of verticillium wilt, as well as snails and slugs.

    • Treat for Pest/Disease

        Apply a sulfur-based fungicide for verticillium wilt. Prevent infection of this fungal pathogen by not planting strawberries in areas where plants from the Solanaeae family have grown within the last three years, such as tomato, potato, pepper and eggplant. Manually remove snails and slugs and destroy them. Prevent snails and slugs from getting to the fruit by mulching with pine needles, which are serrated and hurt the sticky feet of snails and slugs.

    • Transplant

        Transplant in the ground in a full-sun location with excellent drainage in soil that is on the acidic side (5.8-6.5 pH). Eastern or southern exposures are ideal. Western exposures are suitable, except for hot summer and fall months, at which point the plants will require some shade. Two weeks prior to planting, acidify the soil by amending with soil sulfur according to package directions, and break up heavy clay soil by amending with homemade or bagged compost and pumice. Amending with gypsum is also beneficial, as this is a combination of sulfur and gypsum, the latter of which breaks up clay soil. Transplant in containers in a high-quality organic potting soil and place in a full sun location. Most potting soils are neutral or slightly on the acidic side, so amending with soil sulfur at this point generally isn't necessary. The appropriate fertilizer will add sufficient acidity to the soil.

    • Propagate

        June-bearing strawberries, such as Sequoia, will continue sending out runners this month. The runners, which are long stems with leaves and a growth tip at the end, extend from existing "mother" plants. These growth tips will eventually root and create new plants. Help the process along when you see the growth tips by rooting them in surrounding soil or small pots. After 2 to 3 weeks, the new plants will have rooted--at which point you can cut them from the mother plant.

    • Harvest

        Everbearing strawberries, such as Seascape, can be harvested this month and every month of the year.

    • Special requirements

        If you wish to have a strong crop of June-bearing strawberries to plant for next year, rather than severing runners from the mother plants when they root, let them continue to grow attached.

  • October
    • Buy

        Buy bareroot plants when available via mail-order.

    • Plant

        Plant in the ground in a full-sun location with excellent drainage in soil that is on the acidic side (5.8-6.5 pH). Eastern or southern exposures are ideal. Western exposures are suitable, except for hot summer and fall months, at which point the plants will require some shade. Two weeks prior to planting, acidify the soil by amending with soil sulfur according to package directions, and break up heavy clay soil by amending with homemade or bagged compost and pumice. Amending with gypsum is also beneficial, as this is a combination of sulfur and gypsum, the latter of which breaks up clay soil. Plant in containers in a high-quality organic potting soil and place in a full sun location. Most potting soils are neutral or slightly on the acidic side, so amending with soil sulfur at this point generally isn't necessary. The appropriate fertilizer will add sufficient acidity to the soil.

    • Fertilize

        Feed with a fertilizer designed for acid-loving, fruiting plants once this month.

    • Water

        Water in-ground plants when the top 1-2 inches of soil has dried out. Water container plants daily when the top 1-2 inches of soil has dried out.

    • Mulch

        Keep fruit off the soil and maintain even soil temperature and moisture by maintaining a 1-2 inch layer of mulch around the base of the plants. Pine needles are an ideal mulch, as they keep the strawberries away from soil, discourage pests and slowly break down to acidify the soil.

    • Pest/Disease Inspection

        Check plants for signs of verticillium wilt, as well as snails and slugs.

    • Treat for Pest/Disease

        Apply a sulfur-based fungicide for verticillium wilt. Prevent infection of this fungal pathogen by not planting strawberries in areas where plants from the Solanaeae family have grown within the last three years, such as tomato, potato, pepper and eggplant. Manually remove snails and slugs and destroy them. Prevent snails and slugs from getting to the fruit by mulching with pine needles, which are serrated and hurt the sticky feet of snails and slugs.

    • Transplant

        Transplant in the ground in a full-sun location with excellent drainage in soil that is on the acidic side (5.8-6.5 pH). Eastern or southern exposures are ideal. Western exposures are suitable, except for hot summer and fall months, at which point the plants will require some shade. Two weeks prior to planting, acidify the soil by amending with soil sulfur according to package directions, and break up heavy clay soil by amending with homemade or bagged compost and pumice. Amending with gypsum is also beneficial, as this is a combination of sulfur and gypsum, the latter of which breaks up clay soil. Transplant in containers in a high-quality organic potting soil and place in a full sun location. Most potting soils are neutral or slightly on the acidic side, so amending with soil sulfur at this point generally isn't necessary. The appropriate fertilizer will add sufficient acidity to the soil.

    • Propagate

        June-bearing strawberries, such as Sequoia, will continue sending out runners this month. The runners, which are long stems with leaves and a growth tip at the end, extend from existing "mother" plants. These growth tips will eventually root and create new plants. Help the process along when you see the growth tips by rooting them in surrounding soil or small pots. After 2 to 3 weeks, the new plants will have rooted--at which point you can cut them from the mother plant.

    • Harvest

        Everbearing strawberries, such as Seascape, can be harvested this month and every month of the year.

    • Special requirements

        If you wish to have a strong crop of June-bearing strawberries to plant for next year, snip all the runners from the parent plants at this time, leaving about two inches of runner on each newly formed daughter plant. Carefully dig them up with as many roots as possible. Place the plants in a thin plastic bag in the refrigerator for 15 to 20 days--keeping them away from all fruits. Take them from the refrigerator by November 5th and plant them. They will set fruit generally by March or early April.

  • November
    • Buy

        Buy bareroot plants when available via mail-order.

    • Plant

        Plant in the ground in a full-sun location with excellent drainage in soil that is on the acidic side (5.8-6.5 pH). Eastern or southern exposures are ideal. Western exposures are suitable, except for hot summer and fall months, at which point the plants will require some shade. Two weeks prior to planting, acidify the soil by amending with soil sulfur according to package directions, and break up heavy clay soil by amending with homemade or bagged compost and pumice. Amending with gypsum is also beneficial, as this is a combination of sulfur and gypsum, the latter of which breaks up clay soil. Plant in containers in a high-quality organic potting soil and place in a full sun location. Most potting soils are neutral or slightly on the acidic side, so amending with soil sulfur at this point generally isn't necessary. The appropriate fertilizer will add sufficient acidity to the soil.

    • Water

        In the absence of rainfall, water in-ground plants when the top 1-2 inches of soil has dried out. Water container plants once or twice a week when the top 1-2 inches of soil has dried out.

    • Pest/Disease Inspection

        Check plants for signs of verticillium wilt, as well as snails and slugs.

    • Treat for Pest/Disease

        Apply a sulfur-based fungicide for verticillium wilt. Prevent infection of this fungal pathogen by not planting strawberries in areas where plants from the Solanaeae family have grown within the last three years, such as tomato, potato, pepper and eggplant. Manually remove snails and slugs and destroy them. Prevent snails and slugs from getting to the fruit by mulching with pine needles, which are serrated and hurt the sticky feet of snails and slugs.

    • Transplant

        Transplant in the ground in a full-sun location with excellent drainage in soil that is on the acidic side (5.8-6.5 pH). Eastern or southern exposures are ideal. Western exposures are suitable, except for hot summer and fall months, at which point the plants will require some shade. Two weeks prior to planting, acidify the soil by amending with soil sulfur according to package directions, and break up heavy clay soil by amending with homemade or bagged compost and pumice. Amending with gypsum is also beneficial, as this is a combination of sulfur and gypsum, the latter of which breaks up clay soil. Transplant in containers in a high-quality organic potting soil and place in a full sun location. Most potting soils are neutral or slightly on the acidic side, so amending with soil sulfur at this point generally isn't necessary. The appropriate fertilizer will add sufficient acidity to the soil.

    • Harvest

        Everbearing strawberries, such as Seascape, can be harvested this month and every month of the year.

  • December
    • Buy

        Buy bareroot plants when available in the nursery or via mail-order.

    • Plant

        Plant in the ground in a full-sun location with excellent drainage in soil that is on the acidic side (5.8-6.5 pH). Eastern or southern exposures are ideal. Western exposures are suitable, except for hot summer and fall months, at which point the plants will require some shade. Two weeks prior to planting, acidify the soil by amending with soil sulfur according to package directions, and break up heavy clay soil by amending with homemade or bagged compost and pumice. Amending with gypsum is also beneficial, as this is a combination of sulfur and gypsum, the latter of which breaks up clay soil. Plant in containers in a high-quality organic potting soil and place in a full sun location. Most potting soils are neutral or slightly on the acidic side, so amending with soil sulfur at this point generally isn't necessary. The appropriate fertilizer will add sufficient acidity to the soil.

    • Water

        In the absence of rainfall, water in-ground plants when the top 1-2 inches of soil has dried out. Water container plants once or twice a week when the top 1-2 inches of soil has dried out.

    • Pest/Disease Inspection

        Check plants for signs of verticillium wilt, as well as snails and slugs.

    • Treat for Pest/Disease

        Apply a sulfur-based fungicide for verticillium wilt. Prevent infection of this fungal pathogen by not planting strawberries in areas where plants from the Solanaeae family have grown within the last three years, such as tomato, potato, pepper and eggplant. Manually remove snails and slugs and destroy them. Prevent snails and slugs from getting to the fruit by mulching with pine needles, which are serrated and hurt the sticky feet of snails and slugs.

    • Transplant

        Transplant in the ground in a full-sun location with excellent drainage in soil that is on the acidic side (5.8-6.5 pH). Eastern or southern exposures are ideal. Western exposures are suitable, except for hot summer and fall months, at which point the plants will require some shade. Two weeks prior to planting, acidify the soil by amending with soil sulfur according to package directions, and break up heavy clay soil by amending with homemade or bagged compost and pumice. Amending with gypsum is also beneficial, as this is a combination of sulfur and gypsum, the latter of which breaks up clay soil. Transplant in containers in a high-quality organic potting soil and place in a full sun location. Most potting soils are neutral or slightly on the acidic side, so amending with soil sulfur at this point generally isn't necessary. The appropriate fertilizer will add sufficient acidity to the soil.

    • Harvest

        Everbearing strawberries, such as Seascape, can be harvested this month and every month of the year.

  • Winter
    • Spring
      • Summer
        • Fall
          • Buy

            When's the best time to buy this plant? When can you buy these from seed (if you can)? When is it usually available? What are things to look for when you're buying it? Or anything other tidbit of information you can share!

            •  Jan
            •  Feb
            •  Mar
            •  Apr
            •  May
            •  Jun
            •  Jul
            •  Aug
            •  Sep
            •  Oct
            •  Nov
            •  Dec
            • January

              Buy bareroot plants when available in the nursery or via mail-order.

            • February

              Buy bareroot plants and transplants when available in the nursery or via mail-order.

            • March

              Buy transplants when available in the nursery or via mail-order.

            • April

              Buy transplants when available in the nursery or via mail-order.

            • May

              Buy transplants when available in the nursery or via mail-order.

            • June

              Buy transplants when available in the nursery.

            • October

              Buy bareroot plants when available via mail-order.

            • November

              Buy bareroot plants when available via mail-order.

            • December

              Buy bareroot plants when available in the nursery or via mail-order.

          • Plant

            When's a good time to plant this plant or bulb? Any special planting instructions?

            •  Jan
            •  Feb
            •  Mar
            •  Apr
            •  May
            •  Jun
            •  Jul
            •  Aug
            •  Sep
            •  Oct
            •  Nov
            •  Dec
            • January

              Plant in the ground in a full-sun location with excellent drainage in soil that is on the acidic side (5.8-6.5 pH). Eastern or southern exposures are ideal. Western exposures are suitable, except for hot summer and fall months, at which point the plants will require some shade. Two weeks prior to planting, acidify the soil by amending with soil sulfur according to package directions, and break up heavy clay soil by amending with homemade or bagged compost and pumice. Amending with gypsum is also beneficial, as this is a combination of sulfur and gypsum, the latter of which breaks up clay soil. Plant in containers in a high-quality organic potting soil and place in a full sun location. Most potting soils are neutral or slightly on the acidic side, so amending with soil sulfur at this point generally isn't necessary. The appropriate fertilizer will add sufficient acidity to the soil.

            • February

              Plant in the ground in a full-sun location with excellent drainage in soil that is on the acidic side (5.8-6.5 pH). Eastern or southern exposures are ideal. Western exposures are suitable, except for hot summer and fall months, at which point the plants will require some shade. Two weeks prior to planting, acidify the soil by amending with soil sulfur according to package directions, and break up heavy clay soil by amending with homemade or bagged compost and pumice. Amending with gypsum is also beneficial, as this is a combination of sulfur and gypsum, the latter of which breaks up clay soil. Plant in containers in a high-quality organic potting soil and place in a full sun location. Most potting soils are neutral or slightly on the acidic side, so amending with soil sulfur at this point generally isn't necessary. The appropriate fertilizer will add sufficient acidity to the soil.

            • March

              Plant in the ground in a full-sun location with excellent drainage in soil that is on the acidic side (5.8-6.5 pH). Eastern or southern exposures are ideal. Western exposures are suitable, except for hot summer and fall months, at which point the plants will require some shade. Two weeks prior to planting, acidify the soil by amending with soil sulfur according to package directions, and break up heavy clay soil by amending with homemade or bagged compost and pumice. Amending with gypsum is also beneficial, as this is a combination of sulfur and gypsum, the latter of which breaks up clay soil. Plant in containers in a high-quality organic potting soil and place in a full sun location. Most potting soils are neutral or slightly on the acidic side, so amending with soil sulfur at this point generally isn't necessary. The appropriate fertilizer will add sufficient acidity to the soil.

            • April

              Plant in the ground in a full-sun location with excellent drainage in soil that is on the acidic side (5.8-6.5 pH). Eastern or southern exposures are ideal. Western exposures are suitable, except for hot summer and fall months, at which point the plants will require some shade. Two weeks prior to planting, acidify the soil by amending with soil sulfur according to package directions, and break up heavy clay soil by amending with homemade or bagged compost and pumice. Amending with gypsum is also beneficial, as this is a combination of sulfur and gypsum, the latter of which breaks up clay soil. Plant in containers in a high-quality organic potting soil and place in a full sun location. Most potting soils are neutral or slightly on the acidic side, so amending with soil sulfur at this point generally isn't necessary. The appropriate fertilizer will add sufficient acidity to the soil.

            • May

              Plant in the ground in a full-sun location with excellent drainage in soil that is on the acidic side (5.8-6.5 pH). Eastern or southern exposures are ideal. Western exposures are suitable, except for hot summer and fall months, at which point the plants will require some shade. Two weeks prior to planting, acidify the soil by amending with soil sulfur according to package directions, and break up heavy clay soil by amending with homemade or bagged compost and pumice. Amending with gypsum is also beneficial, as this is a combination of sulfur and gypsum, the latter of which breaks up clay soil. Plant in containers in a high-quality organic potting soil and place in a full sun location. Most potting soils are neutral or slightly on the acidic side, so amending with soil sulfur at this point generally isn't necessary. The appropriate fertilizer will add sufficient acidity to the soil.

            • June

              Plant in the ground in a full-sun location with excellent drainage in soil that is on the acidic side (5.8-6.5 pH). Eastern or southern exposures are ideal. Western exposures are suitable, except for hot summer and fall months, at which point the plants will require some shade. Two weeks prior to planting, acidify the soil by amending with soil sulfur according to package directions, and break up heavy clay soil by amending with homemade or bagged compost and pumice. Amending with gypsum is also beneficial, as this is a combination of sulfur and gypsum, the latter of which breaks up clay soil. Plant in containers in a high-quality organic potting soil and place in a full sun location. Most potting soils are neutral or slightly on the acidic side, so amending with soil sulfur at this point generally isn't necessary. The appropriate fertilizer will add sufficient acidity to the soil.

            • October

              Plant in the ground in a full-sun location with excellent drainage in soil that is on the acidic side (5.8-6.5 pH). Eastern or southern exposures are ideal. Western exposures are suitable, except for hot summer and fall months, at which point the plants will require some shade. Two weeks prior to planting, acidify the soil by amending with soil sulfur according to package directions, and break up heavy clay soil by amending with homemade or bagged compost and pumice. Amending with gypsum is also beneficial, as this is a combination of sulfur and gypsum, the latter of which breaks up clay soil. Plant in containers in a high-quality organic potting soil and place in a full sun location. Most potting soils are neutral or slightly on the acidic side, so amending with soil sulfur at this point generally isn't necessary. The appropriate fertilizer will add sufficient acidity to the soil.

            • November

              Plant in the ground in a full-sun location with excellent drainage in soil that is on the acidic side (5.8-6.5 pH). Eastern or southern exposures are ideal. Western exposures are suitable, except for hot summer and fall months, at which point the plants will require some shade. Two weeks prior to planting, acidify the soil by amending with soil sulfur according to package directions, and break up heavy clay soil by amending with homemade or bagged compost and pumice. Amending with gypsum is also beneficial, as this is a combination of sulfur and gypsum, the latter of which breaks up clay soil. Plant in containers in a high-quality organic potting soil and place in a full sun location. Most potting soils are neutral or slightly on the acidic side, so amending with soil sulfur at this point generally isn't necessary. The appropriate fertilizer will add sufficient acidity to the soil.

            • December

              Plant in the ground in a full-sun location with excellent drainage in soil that is on the acidic side (5.8-6.5 pH). Eastern or southern exposures are ideal. Western exposures are suitable, except for hot summer and fall months, at which point the plants will require some shade. Two weeks prior to planting, acidify the soil by amending with soil sulfur according to package directions, and break up heavy clay soil by amending with homemade or bagged compost and pumice. Amending with gypsum is also beneficial, as this is a combination of sulfur and gypsum, the latter of which breaks up clay soil. Plant in containers in a high-quality organic potting soil and place in a full sun location. Most potting soils are neutral or slightly on the acidic side, so amending with soil sulfur at this point generally isn't necessary. The appropriate fertilizer will add sufficient acidity to the soil.

          • Sow Seeds

            When can you plant these seeds? When's the best time? Can you start them indoors and move them out? Do they have any special requirements?

            •  Jan
            •  Feb
            •  Mar
            •  Apr
            •  May
            •  Jun
            •  Jul
            •  Aug
            •  Sep
            •  Oct
            •  Nov
            •  Dec
            • Fertilize

              When should you fertilize this plant? Which kind of fertilizer do you recommend? Should you use different fertilizers at different times of year?

              •  Jan
              •  Feb
              •  Mar
              •  Apr
              •  May
              •  Jun
              •  Jul
              •  Aug
              •  Sep
              •  Oct
              •  Nov
              •  Dec
              • February

                Feed with a fertilizer designed for acid-loving, fruiting plants once this month.

              • March

                Feed with a fertilizer designed for acid-loving, fruiting plants once this month.

              • April

                Feed with a fertilizer designed for acid-loving, fruiting plants once this month.

              • May

                Feed with a fertilizer designed for acid-loving, fruiting plants once this month.

              • June

                Feed with a fertilizer designed for acid-loving, fruiting plants once this month.

              • July

                Feed with a fertilizer designed for acid-loving, fruiting plants once this month.

              • August

                Feed with a fertilizer designed for acid-loving, fruiting plants once this month.

              • September

                Feed with a fertilizer designed for acid-loving, fruiting plants once this month.

              • October

                Feed with a fertilizer designed for acid-loving, fruiting plants once this month.

            • Water

              Is there a time to reduce or increase watering? Any special requirements? Things to avoid during certain times of the year?

              •  Jan
              •  Feb
              •  Mar
              •  Apr
              •  May
              •  Jun
              •  Jul
              •  Aug
              •  Sep
              •  Oct
              •  Nov
              •  Dec
              • January

                In the absence of rainfall, water in-ground plants when the top 1-2 inches of soil has dried out. Water container plants once or twice a week when the top 1-2 inches of soil has dried out.

              • February

                In the absence of rainfall, water in-ground plants when the top 1-2 inches of soil has dried out. Water container plants once or twice a week when the top 1-2 inches of soil has dried out.

              • March

                In the absence of rainfall, water in-ground plants when the top 1-2 inches of soil has dried out. Water container plants twice a week when the top 1-2 inches of soil has dried out.

              • April

                Water in-ground plants when the top 1-2 inches of soil has dried out. Water container plants three times a week when the top 1-2 inches of soil has dried out.

              • May

                Water in-ground plants when the top 1-2 inches of soil has dried out. Water container plants three times a week when the top 1-2 inches of soil has dried out.

              • June

                Water in-ground plants when the top 1-2 inches of soil has dried out. Water container plants four times a week when the top 1-2 inches of soil has dried out.

              • July

                Water in-ground plants when the top 1-2 inches of soil has dried out. Water container plants daily when the top 1-2 inches of soil has dried out.

              • August

                Water in-ground plants when the top 1-2 inches of soil has dried out. Water container plants daily when the top 1-2 inches of soil has dried out.

              • September

                Water in-ground plants when the top 1-2 inches of soil has dried out. Water container plants daily when the top 1-2 inches of soil has dried out.

              • October

                Water in-ground plants when the top 1-2 inches of soil has dried out. Water container plants daily when the top 1-2 inches of soil has dried out.

              • November

                In the absence of rainfall, water in-ground plants when the top 1-2 inches of soil has dried out. Water container plants once or twice a week when the top 1-2 inches of soil has dried out.

              • December

                In the absence of rainfall, water in-ground plants when the top 1-2 inches of soil has dried out. Water container plants once or twice a week when the top 1-2 inches of soil has dried out.

            • Prune

              When's a good time to prune this plant? How about deadheading, pinching back, trimming or any other grooming? Any special requirements?

              •  Jan
              •  Feb
              •  Mar
              •  Apr
              •  May
              •  Jun
              •  Jul
              •  Aug
              •  Sep
              •  Oct
              •  Nov
              •  Dec
              • Mulch

                Does this plant need to be mulched? Are there specific types of Mulch which are better for this plant? How much?

                •  Jan
                •  Feb
                •  Mar
                •  Apr
                •  May
                •  Jun
                •  Jul
                •  Aug
                •  Sep
                •  Oct
                •  Nov
                •  Dec
                • April

                  Keep fruit off the soil and maintain even soil temperature and moisture by maintaining a 1-2 inch layer of mulch around the base of the plants. Pine needles are an ideal mulch, as they keep the strawberries away from soil, discourage pests and slowly break down to acidify the soil.

                • May

                  Keep fruit off the soil and maintain even soil temperature and moisture by maintaining a 1-2 inch layer of mulch around the base of the plants. Pine needles are an ideal mulch, as they keep the strawberries away from soil, discourage pests and slowly break down to acidify the soil.

                • June

                  Keep fruit off the soil and maintain even soil temperature and moisture by maintaining a 1-2 inch layer of mulch around the base of the plants. Pine needles are an ideal mulch, as they keep the strawberries away from soil, discourage pests and slowly break down to acidify the soil.

                • July

                  Keep fruit off the soil and maintain even soil temperature and moisture by maintaining a 1-2 inch layer of mulch around the base of the plants. Pine needles are an ideal mulch, as they keep the strawberries away from soil, discourage pests and slowly break down to acidify the soil.

                • August

                  Keep fruit off the soil and maintain even soil temperature and moisture by maintaining a 1-2 inch layer of mulch around the base of the plants. Pine needles are an ideal mulch, as they keep the strawberries away from soil, discourage pests and slowly break down to acidify the soil.

                • September

                  Keep fruit off the soil and maintain even soil temperature and moisture by maintaining a 1-2 inch layer of mulch around the base of the plants. Pine needles are an ideal mulch, as they keep the strawberries away from soil, discourage pests and slowly break down to acidify the soil.

                • October

                  Keep fruit off the soil and maintain even soil temperature and moisture by maintaining a 1-2 inch layer of mulch around the base of the plants. Pine needles are an ideal mulch, as they keep the strawberries away from soil, discourage pests and slowly break down to acidify the soil.

              • Protect

                When and how should you protect this plant from birds, deer, rabbits? Does this plant need be covered, or wrapped or painted or moved?

                •  Jan
                •  Feb
                •  Mar
                •  Apr
                •  May
                •  Jun
                •  Jul
                •  Aug
                •  Sep
                •  Oct
                •  Nov
                •  Dec
                • Pest/Disease Inspection

                  What are the common problems this plant will face and when should you look for them to appear?

                  •  Jan
                  •  Feb
                  •  Mar
                  •  Apr
                  •  May
                  •  Jun
                  •  Jul
                  •  Aug
                  •  Sep
                  •  Oct
                  •  Nov
                  •  Dec
                  • January

                    Check plants for signs of verticillium wilt, as well as snails and slugs.

                  • February

                    Check plants for signs of verticillium wilt, as well as snails and slugs.

                  • March

                    Check plants for signs of verticillium wilt, as well as snails and slugs.

                  • April

                    Check plants for signs of verticillium wilt, snails and slugs and aphids.

                  • May

                    Check plants for signs of verticillium wilt, snails and slugs and aphids.

                  • June

                    Check plants for signs of verticillium wilt, snails and slugs and aphids.

                  • July

                    Check plants for signs of verticillium wilt, snails and slugs and aphids.

                  • August

                    Check plants for signs of verticillium wilt, snails and slugs and aphids.

                  • September

                    Check plants for signs of verticillium wilt, as well as snails and slugs.

                  • October

                    Check plants for signs of verticillium wilt, as well as snails and slugs.

                  • November

                    Check plants for signs of verticillium wilt, as well as snails and slugs.

                  • December

                    Check plants for signs of verticillium wilt, as well as snails and slugs.

                • Treat for Pest/Disease

                  How do you treat the common problems for this plant? What products or concoctions or natural means do you use? Any special requirements?

                  •  Jan
                  •  Feb
                  •  Mar
                  •  Apr
                  •  May
                  •  Jun
                  •  Jul
                  •  Aug
                  •  Sep
                  •  Oct
                  •  Nov
                  •  Dec
                  • January

                    Apply a sulfur-based fungicide for verticillium wilt. Prevent infection of this fungal pathogen by not planting strawberries in areas where plants from the Solanaeae family have grown within the last three years, such as tomato, potato, pepper and eggplant. Manually remove snails and slugs and destroy them. Prevent snails and slugs from getting to the fruit by mulching with pine needles, which are serrated and hurt the sticky feet of snails and slugs.

                  • February

                    Apply a sulfur-based fungicide for verticillium wilt. Prevent infection of this fungal pathogen by not planting strawberries in areas where plants from the Solanaeae family have grown within the last three years, such as tomato, potato, pepper and eggplant. Manually remove snails and slugs and destroy them. Prevent snails and slugs from getting to the fruit by mulching with pine needles, which are serrated and hurt the sticky feet of snails and slugs.

                  • March

                    Apply a sulfur-based fungicide for verticillium wilt. Prevent infection of this fungal pathogen by not planting strawberries in areas where plants from the Solanaeae family have grown within the last three years, such as tomato, potato, pepper and eggplant. Manually remove snails and slugs and destroy them. Prevent snails and slugs from getting to the fruit by mulching with pine needles, which are serrated and hurt the sticky feet of snails and slugs.

                  • April

                    Apply a sulfur-based fungicide for verticillium wilt. Prevent infection of this fungal pathogen by not planting strawberries in areas where plants from the Solanaeae family have grown within the last three years, such as tomato, potato, pepper and eggplant. Manually remove snails and slugs and destroy them. Prevent snails and slugs from getting to the fruit by mulching with pine needles, which are serrated and hurt the sticky feet of snails and slugs. Remove aphids with a strong spray of water. Repeat as necessary until they are gone.

                  • May

                    Apply a sulfur-based fungicide for verticillium wilt. Prevent infection of this fungal pathogen by not planting strawberries in areas where plants from the Solanaeae family have grown within the last three years, such as tomato, potato, pepper and eggplant. Manually remove snails and slugs and destroy them. Prevent snails and slugs from getting to the fruit by mulching with pine needles, which are serrated and hurt the sticky feet of snails and slugs. Remove aphids with a strong spray of water. Repeat as necessary until they are gone.

                  • June

                    Apply a sulfur-based fungicide for verticillium wilt. Prevent infection of this fungal pathogen by not planting strawberries in areas where plants from the Solanaeae family have grown within the last three years, such as tomato, potato, pepper and eggplant. Manually remove snails and slugs and destroy them. Prevent snails and slugs from getting to the fruit by mulching with pine needles, which are serrated and hurt the sticky feet of snails and slugs. Remove aphids with a strong spray of water. Repeat as necessary until they are gone.

                  • July

                    Apply a sulfur-based fungicide for verticillium wilt. Prevent infection of this fungal pathogen by not planting strawberries in areas where plants from the Solanaeae family have grown within the last three years, such as tomato, potato, pepper and eggplant. Manually remove snails and slugs and destroy them. Prevent snails and slugs from getting to the fruit by mulching with pine needles, which are serrated and hurt the sticky feet of snails and slugs. Remove aphids with a strong spray of water. Repeat as necessary until they are gone.

                  • August

                    Apply a sulfur-based fungicide for verticillium wilt. Prevent infection of this fungal pathogen by not planting strawberries in areas where plants from the Solanaeae family have grown within the last three years, such as tomato, potato, pepper and eggplant. Manually remove snails and slugs and destroy them. Prevent snails and slugs from getting to the fruit by mulching with pine needles, which are serrated and hurt the sticky feet of snails and slugs. Remove aphids with a strong spray of water. Repeat as necessary until they are gone.

                  • September

                    Apply a sulfur-based fungicide for verticillium wilt. Prevent infection of this fungal pathogen by not planting strawberries in areas where plants from the Solanaeae family have grown within the last three years, such as tomato, potato, pepper and eggplant. Manually remove snails and slugs and destroy them. Prevent snails and slugs from getting to the fruit by mulching with pine needles, which are serrated and hurt the sticky feet of snails and slugs.

                  • October

                    Apply a sulfur-based fungicide for verticillium wilt. Prevent infection of this fungal pathogen by not planting strawberries in areas where plants from the Solanaeae family have grown within the last three years, such as tomato, potato, pepper and eggplant. Manually remove snails and slugs and destroy them. Prevent snails and slugs from getting to the fruit by mulching with pine needles, which are serrated and hurt the sticky feet of snails and slugs.

                  • November

                    Apply a sulfur-based fungicide for verticillium wilt. Prevent infection of this fungal pathogen by not planting strawberries in areas where plants from the Solanaeae family have grown within the last three years, such as tomato, potato, pepper and eggplant. Manually remove snails and slugs and destroy them. Prevent snails and slugs from getting to the fruit by mulching with pine needles, which are serrated and hurt the sticky feet of snails and slugs.

                  • December

                    Apply a sulfur-based fungicide for verticillium wilt. Prevent infection of this fungal pathogen by not planting strawberries in areas where plants from the Solanaeae family have grown within the last three years, such as tomato, potato, pepper and eggplant. Manually remove snails and slugs and destroy them. Prevent snails and slugs from getting to the fruit by mulching with pine needles, which are serrated and hurt the sticky feet of snails and slugs.

                • Transplant

                  When's the best time to dig up and transplant this from one spot to another? (This is different than planting). Any special requirements?

                  •  Jan
                  •  Feb
                  •  Mar
                  •  Apr
                  •  May
                  •  Jun
                  •  Jul
                  •  Aug
                  •  Sep
                  •  Oct
                  •  Nov
                  •  Dec
                  • January

                    Transplant in the ground in a full-sun location with excellent drainage in soil that is on the acidic side (5.8-6.5 pH). Eastern or southern exposures are ideal. Western exposures are suitable, except for hot summer and fall months, at which point the plants will require some shade. Two weeks prior to planting, acidify the soil by amending with soil sulfur according to package directions, and break up heavy clay soil by amending with homemade or bagged compost and pumice. Amending with gypsum is also beneficial, as this is a combination of sulfur and gypsum, the latter of which breaks up clay soil. Transplant in containers in a high-quality organic potting soil and place in a full sun location. Most potting soils are neutral or slightly on the acidic side, so amending with soil sulfur at this point generally isn't necessary. The appropriate fertilizer will add sufficient acidity to the soil.

                  • February

                    Transplant in the ground in a full-sun location with excellent drainage in soil that is on the acidic side (5.8-6.5 pH). Eastern or southern exposures are ideal. Western exposures are suitable, except for hot summer and fall months, at which point the plants will require some shade. Two weeks prior to planting, acidify the soil by amending with soil sulfur according to package directions, and break up heavy clay soil by amending with homemade or bagged compost and pumice. Amending with gypsum is also beneficial, as this is a combination of sulfur and gypsum, the latter of which breaks up clay soil. Transplant in containers in a high-quality organic potting soil and place in a full sun location. Most potting soils are neutral or slightly on the acidic side, so amending with soil sulfur at this point generally isn't necessary. The appropriate fertilizer will add sufficient acidity to the soil.

                  • March

                    Transplant in the ground in a full-sun location with excellent drainage in soil that is on the acidic side (5.8-6.5 pH). Eastern or southern exposures are ideal. Western exposures are suitable, except for hot summer and fall months, at which point the plants will require some shade. Two weeks prior to planting, acidify the soil by amending with soil sulfur according to package directions, and break up heavy clay soil by amending with homemade or bagged compost and pumice. Amending with gypsum is also beneficial, as this is a combination of sulfur and gypsum, the latter of which breaks up clay soil. Transplant in containers in a high-quality organic potting soil and place in a full sun location. Most potting soils are neutral or slightly on the acidic side, so amending with soil sulfur at this point generally isn't necessary. The appropriate fertilizer will add sufficient acidity to the soil.

                  • April

                    Transplant in the ground in a full-sun location with excellent drainage in soil that is on the acidic side (5.8-6.5 pH). Eastern or southern exposures are ideal. Western exposures are suitable, except for hot summer and fall months, at which point the plants will require some shade. Two weeks prior to planting, acidify the soil by amending with soil sulfur according to package directions, and break up heavy clay soil by amending with homemade or bagged compost and pumice. Amending with gypsum is also beneficial, as this is a combination of sulfur and gypsum, the latter of which breaks up clay soil. Transplant in containers in a high-quality organic potting soil and place in a full sun location. Most potting soils are neutral or slightly on the acidic side, so amending with soil sulfur at this point generally isn't necessary. The appropriate fertilizer will add sufficient acidity to the soil.

                  • May

                    Transplant in the ground in a full-sun location with excellent drainage in soil that is on the acidic side (5.8-6.5 pH). Eastern or southern exposures are ideal. Western exposures are suitable, except for hot summer and fall months, at which point the plants will require some shade. Two weeks prior to planting, acidify the soil by amending with soil sulfur according to package directions, and break up heavy clay soil by amending with homemade or bagged compost and pumice. Amending with gypsum is also beneficial, as this is a combination of sulfur and gypsum, the latter of which breaks up clay soil. Transplant in containers in a high-quality organic potting soil and place in a full sun location. Most potting soils are neutral or slightly on the acidic side, so amending with soil sulfur at this point generally isn't necessary. The appropriate fertilizer will add sufficient acidity to the soil.

                  • June

                    Transplant in the ground in a full-sun location with excellent drainage in soil that is on the acidic side (5.8-6.5 pH). Eastern or southern exposures are ideal. Western exposures are suitable, except for hot summer and fall months, at which point the plants will require some shade. Two weeks prior to planting, acidify the soil by amending with soil sulfur according to package directions, and break up heavy clay soil by amending with homemade or bagged compost and pumice. Amending with gypsum is also beneficial, as this is a combination of sulfur and gypsum, the latter of which breaks up clay soil. Transplant in containers in a high-quality organic potting soil and place in a full sun location. Most potting soils are neutral or slightly on the acidic side, so amending with soil sulfur at this point generally isn't necessary. The appropriate fertilizer will add sufficient acidity to the soil.

                  • July

                    Transplant in the ground in a full-sun location with excellent drainage in soil that is on the acidic side (5.8-6.5 pH). Eastern or southern exposures are ideal. Western exposures are suitable, except for hot summer and fall months, at which point the plants will require some shade. Two weeks prior to planting, acidify the soil by amending with soil sulfur according to package directions, and break up heavy clay soil by amending with homemade or bagged compost and pumice. Amending with gypsum is also beneficial, as this is a combination of sulfur and gypsum, the latter of which breaks up clay soil. Transplant in containers in a high-quality organic potting soil and place in a full sun location. Most potting soils are neutral or slightly on the acidic side, so amending with soil sulfur at this point generally isn't necessary. The appropriate fertilizer will add sufficient acidity to the soil.

                  • August

                    Transplant in the ground in a full-sun location with excellent drainage in soil that is on the acidic side (5.8-6.5 pH). Eastern or southern exposures are ideal. Western exposures are suitable, except for hot summer and fall months, at which point the plants will require some shade. Two weeks prior to planting, acidify the soil by amending with soil sulfur according to package directions, and break up heavy clay soil by amending with homemade or bagged compost and pumice. Amending with gypsum is also beneficial, as this is a combination of sulfur and gypsum, the latter of which breaks up clay soil. Transplant in containers in a high-quality organic potting soil and place in a full sun location. Most potting soils are neutral or slightly on the acidic side, so amending with soil sulfur at this point generally isn't necessary. The appropriate fertilizer will add sufficient acidity to the soil.

                  • September

                    Transplant in the ground in a full-sun location with excellent drainage in soil that is on the acidic side (5.8-6.5 pH). Eastern or southern exposures are ideal. Western exposures are suitable, except for hot summer and fall months, at which point the plants will require some shade. Two weeks prior to planting, acidify the soil by amending with soil sulfur according to package directions, and break up heavy clay soil by amending with homemade or bagged compost and pumice. Amending with gypsum is also beneficial, as this is a combination of sulfur and gypsum, the latter of which breaks up clay soil. Transplant in containers in a high-quality organic potting soil and place in a full sun location. Most potting soils are neutral or slightly on the acidic side, so amending with soil sulfur at this point generally isn't necessary. The appropriate fertilizer will add sufficient acidity to the soil.

                  • October

                    Transplant in the ground in a full-sun location with excellent drainage in soil that is on the acidic side (5.8-6.5 pH). Eastern or southern exposures are ideal. Western exposures are suitable, except for hot summer and fall months, at which point the plants will require some shade. Two weeks prior to planting, acidify the soil by amending with soil sulfur according to package directions, and break up heavy clay soil by amending with homemade or bagged compost and pumice. Amending with gypsum is also beneficial, as this is a combination of sulfur and gypsum, the latter of which breaks up clay soil. Transplant in containers in a high-quality organic potting soil and place in a full sun location. Most potting soils are neutral or slightly on the acidic side, so amending with soil sulfur at this point generally isn't necessary. The appropriate fertilizer will add sufficient acidity to the soil.

                  • November

                    Transplant in the ground in a full-sun location with excellent drainage in soil that is on the acidic side (5.8-6.5 pH). Eastern or southern exposures are ideal. Western exposures are suitable, except for hot summer and fall months, at which point the plants will require some shade. Two weeks prior to planting, acidify the soil by amending with soil sulfur according to package directions, and break up heavy clay soil by amending with homemade or bagged compost and pumice. Amending with gypsum is also beneficial, as this is a combination of sulfur and gypsum, the latter of which breaks up clay soil. Transplant in containers in a high-quality organic potting soil and place in a full sun location. Most potting soils are neutral or slightly on the acidic side, so amending with soil sulfur at this point generally isn't necessary. The appropriate fertilizer will add sufficient acidity to the soil.

                  • December

                    Transplant in the ground in a full-sun location with excellent drainage in soil that is on the acidic side (5.8-6.5 pH). Eastern or southern exposures are ideal. Western exposures are suitable, except for hot summer and fall months, at which point the plants will require some shade. Two weeks prior to planting, acidify the soil by amending with soil sulfur according to package directions, and break up heavy clay soil by amending with homemade or bagged compost and pumice. Amending with gypsum is also beneficial, as this is a combination of sulfur and gypsum, the latter of which breaks up clay soil. Transplant in containers in a high-quality organic potting soil and place in a full sun location. Most potting soils are neutral or slightly on the acidic side, so amending with soil sulfur at this point generally isn't necessary. The appropriate fertilizer will add sufficient acidity to the soil.

                • Propagate

                  When's a good time to divide, take cuttings, layer or propagate this plant. Any special requirements?

                  •  Jan
                  •  Feb
                  •  Mar
                  •  Apr
                  •  May
                  •  Jun
                  •  Jul
                  •  Aug
                  •  Sep
                  •  Oct
                  •  Nov
                  •  Dec
                  • July

                    June-bearing strawberries, such as Sequoia, begin sending out runners this month. The runners, which are long stems with leaves and a growth tip at the end, extend from existing "mother" plants. These growth tips will eventually root and create new plants. Help the process along when you see the growth tips by rooting them in surrounding soil or small pots. After 2 to 3 weeks, the new plants will have rooted--at which point you can cut them from the mother plant.

                  • August

                    June-bearing strawberries, such as Sequoia, will continue sending out runners this month. The runners, which are long stems with leaves and a growth tip at the end, extend from existing "mother" plants. These growth tips will eventually root and create new plants. Help the process along when you see the growth tips by rooting them in surrounding soil or small pots. After 2 to 3 weeks, the new plants will have rooted--at which point you can cut them from the mother plant.

                  • September

                    June-bearing strawberries, such as Sequoia, will continue sending out runners this month. The runners, which are long stems with leaves and a growth tip at the end, extend from existing "mother" plants. These growth tips will eventually root and create new plants. Help the process along when you see the growth tips by rooting them in surrounding soil or small pots. After 2 to 3 weeks, the new plants will have rooted--at which point you can cut them from the mother plant.

                  • October

                    June-bearing strawberries, such as Sequoia, will continue sending out runners this month. The runners, which are long stems with leaves and a growth tip at the end, extend from existing "mother" plants. These growth tips will eventually root and create new plants. Help the process along when you see the growth tips by rooting them in surrounding soil or small pots. After 2 to 3 weeks, the new plants will have rooted--at which point you can cut them from the mother plant.

                • Harvest

                  When's a good time to harvest this plant? What's the best way to harvest? Are there special requirements or features?

                  •  Jan
                  •  Feb
                  •  Mar
                  •  Apr
                  •  May
                  •  Jun
                  •  Jul
                  •  Aug
                  •  Sep
                  •  Oct
                  •  Nov
                  •  Dec
                  • January

                    Everbearing strawberries, such as Seascape, can be harvested this month and every month of the year.

                  • February

                    Everbearing strawberries, such as Seascape, can be harvested this month and every month of the year.

                  • March

                    Everbearing strawberries, such as Seascape, can be harvested this month and every month of the year.

                  • April

                    Everbearing strawberries, such as Seascape, can be harvested this month and every month of the year. June-bearing strawberries can generally be harvested starting late this month.

                  • May

                    Everbearing strawberries, such as Seascape, can be harvested this month and every month of the year. June-bearing strawberries can generally be harvested this month.

                  • June

                    Everbearing strawberries, such as Seascape, can be harvested this month and every month of the year. June-bearing strawberries generally can be harvested this month.

                  • July

                    Everbearing strawberries, such as Seascape, can be harvested this month and every month of the year.

                  • August

                    Everbearing strawberries, such as Seascape, can be harvested this month and every month of the year.

                  • September

                    Everbearing strawberries, such as Seascape, can be harvested this month and every month of the year.

                  • October

                    Everbearing strawberries, such as Seascape, can be harvested this month and every month of the year.

                  • November

                    Everbearing strawberries, such as Seascape, can be harvested this month and every month of the year.

                  • December

                    Everbearing strawberries, such as Seascape, can be harvested this month and every month of the year.

                • Special requirements

                  Any other requirement for this plant? Is there anything that doesn't fit into the other care categories?

                  •  Jan
                  •  Feb
                  •  Mar
                  •  Apr
                  •  May
                  •  Jun
                  •  Jul
                  •  Aug
                  •  Sep
                  •  Oct
                  •  Nov
                  •  Dec
                  • July

                    If you wish to have a strong crop of June-bearing strawberries to plant for next year, rather than severing runners from the mother plants when they root, let them continue to grow attached.

                  • August

                    If you wish to have a strong crop of June-bearing strawberries to plant for next year, rather than severing runners from the mother plants when they root, let them continue to grow attached.

                  • September

                    If you wish to have a strong crop of June-bearing strawberries to plant for next year, rather than severing runners from the mother plants when they root, let them continue to grow attached.

                  • October

                    If you wish to have a strong crop of June-bearing strawberries to plant for next year, snip all the runners from the parent plants at this time, leaving about two inches of runner on each newly formed daughter plant. Carefully dig them up with as many roots as possible. Place the plants in a thin plastic bag in the refrigerator for 15 to 20 days--keeping them away from all fruits. Take them from the refrigerator by November 5th and plant them. They will set fruit generally by March or early April.

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