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General Information

Plant Care Instructions By Julie Bawden-Davis

Edible red raspberry that is native to North America, Asia and Europe. Canes generally grow full size in first year and produce fruit the second year. Everbearing varieties produce two crops per year--in spring and again in fall. Canes die back after fruiting second time.

Is Indoor Plant?

No

These month by month plant care tasks are for plants in the following zones :
Sunset Zones : 22, 23, 24
USDA Zones : 10a, 10b
Web Link - For more information

Plant Care Instruction

  • Scroll down or click on any month for plant care instructions
    • January
    • February
    • March
    • April
    • May
    • June
    • July
    • August
    • September
    • October
    • November
    • December
    January
    1. Buy

    Buy bareroot when available in the nursery or from an online merchant.
    2. Plant

    Plant when dormant in a light shade location that is well-draining. Plant in raised beds if the soil is heavy clay. Soil pH should be on the acidic side (6 to 6.5). Avoid planting where you grew tomatoes, eggplant, potatoes or peppers within the last three years, as these plants tend to infect the soil with verticillium wilt. Set plants 2 1/2 to 3 feet apart in rows that are 6 to 10 feet apart. Cut canes back to 4 to 6 inches high.
    3. Mulch

    Maintain a 2- to 3-inch layer of shredded bark in the planting bed, which will keep the soil moist and cool.
    4. Pest/Disease Inspection

    Check for signs of cane borers.
    5. Treat for Pest/Disease

    Spray plants when dormant with lime sulfur to prevent fungal disease, as well as control cane borers and spider mites.
    6. Special requirements

    Raspberries do best when trained on a trellis. String heavy wire between posts and train lateral side branches along wire.
    February
    1. Buy

    Buy bareroot when available in the nursery or from an online merchant.
    2. Plant

    Plant when dormant in a light shade location that is well-draining. Plant in raised beds if the soil is heavy clay. Soil pH should be on the acidic side (6 to 6.5). Avoid planting where you grew tomatoes, eggplant, potatoes or peppers within the last three years, as these plants tend to infect the soil with verticillium wilt. Set plants 2 1/2 to 3 feet apart in rows that are 6 to 10 feet apart. Cut canes back to 4 to 6 inches high.
    3. Mulch

    Maintain a 2- to 3-inch layer of shredded bark in the planting bed, which will keep the soil moist and cool.
    4. Pest/Disease Inspection

    Check for signs of cane borers.
    5. Treat for Pest/Disease

    Spray plants when dormant with lime sulfur to prevent fungal disease, as well as control cane borers and spider mites.
    6. Special requirements

    Raspberries do best when trained on a trellis. String heavy wire between posts and train lateral side branches along wire.
    March
    1. Fertilize

    Feed once with an all-purpose organic 10-10-10 fertilizer.
    2. Water

    Keep the soil around plants moist but not soggy. Avoid letting the soil dry out when the plant is flowering and fruiting.
    3. Prune

    For summer bearing raspberries: After planting, don't prune for the first year. Once they fruit, cut the canes back to the ground. The second year, canes will develop around the crown. Prune out everything but 7 to 10 of the strongest canes and attach them to the trellis. Before new growth appears in spring, cut canes back to 5 feet, which will encourage them to grow laterally. For everbearing raspberries: The first fall, they will produce fruit on the top 1/3 of the plant. After harvest, remove the portion of the plant that produced berries and let the lower part remain to produce the spring crop. In spring, after the canes have fruited, remove them completely. New canes that appear will produce the next crop.
    4. Mulch

    Maintain a 2- to 3-inch layer of shredded bark in the planting bed, which will keep the soil moist and cool.
    5. Pest/Disease Inspection

    Check early in the month for signs of cane borers.
    6. Treat for Pest/Disease

    Treat cane borers and spider mites with horticultural oil.
    April
    1. Fertilize

    Feed once with an all-purpose organic 10-10-10 fertilizer.
    2. Water

    Keep the soil around plants moist but not soggy. Avoid letting the soil dry out when the plant is flowering and fruiting.
    3. Prune

    For summer bearing raspberries: After planting, don't prune for the first year. Once they fruit, cut the canes back to the ground. The second year, canes will develop around the crown. Prune out everything but 7 to 10 of the strongest canes and attach them to the trellis. Before new growth appears in spring, cut canes back to 5 feet, which will encourage them to grow laterally. For everbearing raspberries: The first fall, they will produce fruit on the top 1/3 of the plant. After harvest, remove the portion of the plant that produced berries and let the lower part remain to produce the spring crop. In spring, after the canes have fruited, remove them completely. New canes that appear will produce the next crop.
    4. Mulch

    Maintain a 2- to 3-inch layer of shredded bark in the planting bed, which will keep the soil moist and cool.
    5. Pest/Disease Inspection

    Check for spider mites and signs of fungal disease.
    6. Treat for Pest/Disease

    Treat cane borers and spider mites with horticultural oil.
    7. Harvest

    Harvest when the fruit is bright red and sweet.
    May
    1. Fertilize

    Feed once with an all-purpose organic 10-10-10 fertilizer.
    2. Water

    Keep the soil around plants moist but not soggy. Avoid letting the soil dry out when the plant is flowering and fruiting.
    3. Prune

    For summer bearing raspberries: After planting, don't prune for the first year. Once they fruit, cut the canes back to the ground. The second year, canes will develop around the crown. Prune out everything but 7 to 10 of the strongest canes and attach them to the trellis. Before new growth appears in spring, cut canes back to 5 feet, which will encourage them to grow laterally. For everbearing raspberries: The first fall, they will produce fruit on the top 1/3 of the plant. After harvest, remove the portion of the plant that produced berries and let the lower part remain to produce the spring crop. In spring, after the canes have fruited, remove them completely. New canes that appear will produce the next crop.
    4. Mulch

    Maintain a 2- to 3-inch layer of shredded bark in the planting bed, which will keep the soil moist and cool.
    5. Pest/Disease Inspection

    Check for spider mites and signs of fungal disease.
    6. Treat for Pest/Disease

    Treat cane borers and spider mites with horticultural oil.
    7. Harvest

    Harvest when the fruit is bright red and sweet.
    June
    1. Water

    Keep the soil around plants moist but not soggy. Avoid letting the soil dry out when the planting is flowering and fruiting.
    2. Prune

    For summer bearing raspberries: After planting, don't prune for the first year. Once they fruit, cut the canes back to the ground. The second year, canes will develop around the crown. Prune out everything but 7 to 10 of the strongest canes and attach them to the trellis. Before new growth appears in spring, cut canes back to 5 feet, which will encourage them to grow laterally. For everbearing raspberries: The first fall, they will produce fruit on the top 1/3 of the plant. After harvest, remove the portion of the plant that produced berries and let the lower part remain to produce the spring crop. In spring, after the canes have fruited, remove them completely. New canes that appear will produce the next crop.
    3. Mulch

    Maintain a 2- to 3-inch layer of shredded bark in the planting bed, which will keep the soil moist and cool.
    4. Pest/Disease Inspection

    Check for spider mites and signs of fungal disease.
    5. Treat for Pest/Disease

    Treat cane borers and spider mites with horticultural oil.
    6. Harvest

    Harvest when the fruit is bright red and sweet.
    July
    1. Water

    Keep the soil around plants moist but not soggy. Avoid letting the soil dry out when the plant is flowering and fruiting.
    2. Prune

    For summer bearing raspberries: After planting, don't prune for the first year. Once they fruit, cut the canes back to the ground. The second year, canes will develop around the crown. Prune out everything but 7 to 10 of the strongest canes and attach them to the trellis. Before new growth appears in spring, cut canes back to 5 feet, which will encourage them to grow laterally. For everbearing raspberries: The first fall, they will produce fruit on the top 1/3 of the plant. After harvest, remove the portion of the plant that produced berries and let the lower part remain to produce the spring crop. In spring, after the canes have fruited, remove them completely. New canes that appear will produce the next crop.
    3. Mulch

    Maintain a 2- to 3-inch layer of shredded bark in the planting bed, which will keep the soil moist and cool.
    4. Pest/Disease Inspection

    Check for spider mites and signs of fungal disease.
    5. Treat for Pest/Disease

    Treat cane borers and spider mites with horticultural oil.
    6. Harvest

    Harvest when the fruit is bright red and sweet.
    August
    1. Water

    Keep the soil around plants moist but not soggy. Avoid letting the soil dry out when the plant is flowering and fruiting.
    2. Prune

    For summer bearing raspberries: After planting, don't prune for the first year. Once they fruit, cut the canes back to the ground. The second year, canes will develop around the crown. Prune out everything but 7 to 10 of the strongest canes and attach them to the trellis. Before new growth appears in spring, cut canes back to 5 feet, which will encourage them to grow laterally. For everbearing raspberries: The first fall, they will produce fruit on the top 1/3 of the plant. After harvest, remove the portion of the plant that produced berries and let the lower part remain to produce the spring crop. In spring, after the canes have fruited, remove them completely. New canes that appear will produce the next crop.
    3. Mulch

    Maintain a 2- to 3-inch layer of shredded bark in the planting bed, which will keep the soil moist and cool.
    4. Pest/Disease Inspection

    Check for spider mites and signs of fungal disease.
    5. Treat for Pest/Disease

    Treat cane borers and spider mites with horticultural oil.
    6. Harvest

    Harvest when the fruit is bright red and sweet.
    September
    1. Water

    Keep the soil around plants moist but not soggy. Avoid letting the soil dry out when the plant is flowering and fruiting.
    2. Prune

    For summer bearing raspberries: After planting, don't prune for the first year. Once they fruit, cut the canes back to the ground. The second year, canes will develop around the crown. Prune out everything but 7 to 10 of the strongest canes and attach them to the trellis. Before new growth appears in spring, cut canes back to 5 feet, which will encourage them to grow laterally. For everbearing raspberries: The first fall, they will produce fruit on the top 1/3 of the plant. After harvest, remove the portion of the plant that produced berries and let the lower part remain to produce the spring crop. In spring, after the canes have fruited, remove them completely. New canes that appear will produce the next crop.
    3. Mulch

    Maintain a 2- to 3-inch layer of shredded bark in the planting bed, which will keep the soil moist and cool.
    4. Pest/Disease Inspection

    Check for spider mites and signs of fungal disease.
    5. Treat for Pest/Disease

    Treat cane borers and spider mites with horticultural oil.
    6. Harvest

    Harvest when the fruit is bright red and sweet.
    October
    1. Water

    Keep the soil around plants moist but not soggy. Avoid letting the soil dry out when the plant is flowering and fruiting.
    2. Prune

    For summer bearing raspberries: After planting, don't prune for the first year. Once they fruit, cut the canes back to the ground. The second year, canes will develop around the crown. Prune out everything but 7 to 10 of the strongest canes and attach them to the trellis. Before new growth appears in spring, cut canes back to 5 feet, which will encourage them to grow laterally. For everbearing raspberries: The first fall, they will produce fruit on the top 1/3 of the plant. After harvest, remove the portion of the plant that produced berries and let the lower part remain to produce the spring crop. In spring, after the canes have fruited, remove them completely. New canes that appear will produce the next crop.
    3. Mulch

    Maintain a 2- to 3-inch layer of shredded bark in the planting bed, which will keep the soil moist and cool.
    4. Pest/Disease Inspection

    Check for spider mites and signs of fungal disease.
    5. Treat for Pest/Disease

    Treat cane borers and spider mites with horticultural oil.
    November
    1. Mulch

    Maintain a 2- to 3-inch layer of shredded bark in the planting bed, which will keep the soil moist and cool.
    2. Pest/Disease Inspection

    Check for signs of cane borers.
    3. Treat for Pest/Disease

    Treat cane borers and spider mites with horticultural oil.
    December
    1. Buy

    Buy bareroot when available in the nursery or from an online merchant.
    2. Plant

    Plant when dormant in a light shade location that is well-draining. Plant in raised beds if the soil is heavy clay. Soil pH should be on the acidic side (6 to 6.5). Avoid planting where you grew tomatoes, eggplant, potatoes or peppers within the last three years, as these plants tend to infect the soil with verticillium wilt. Set plants 2 1/2 to 3 feet apart in rows that are 6 to 10 feet apart. Cut canes back to 4 to 6 inches high.
    3. Mulch

    Maintain a 2- to 3-inch layer of shredded bark in the planting bed, which will keep the soil moist and cool.
    4. Pest/Disease Inspection

    Check for signs of cane borers.
    5. Treat for Pest/Disease

    Spray plants when dormant with lime sulfur to prevent fungal disease, as well as control cane borers and spider mites.
    6. Special requirements

    Raspberries do best when trained on a trellis. String heavy wire between posts and train lateral side branches along wire.
  • Buy

    When's the best time to buy this plant? When can you buy these from seed (if you can)? When is it usually available? What are things to look for when you're buying it? Or anything other tidbit of information you can share!

    January

    Buy bareroot when available in the nursery or from an online merchant.

    February

    Buy bareroot when available in the nursery or from an online merchant.

    December

    Buy bareroot when available in the nursery or from an online merchant.

    Plant

    When's a good time to plant this plant or bulb? Any special planting instructions?

    January

    Plant when dormant in a light shade location that is well-draining. Plant in raised beds if the soil is heavy clay. Soil pH should be on the acidic side (6 to 6.5). Avoid planting where you grew tomatoes, eggplant, potatoes or peppers within the last three years, as these plants tend to infect the soil with verticillium wilt. Set plants 2 1/2 to 3 feet apart in rows that are 6 to 10 feet apart. Cut canes back to 4 to 6 inches high.

    February

    Plant when dormant in a light shade location that is well-draining. Plant in raised beds if the soil is heavy clay. Soil pH should be on the acidic side (6 to 6.5). Avoid planting where you grew tomatoes, eggplant, potatoes or peppers within the last three years, as these plants tend to infect the soil with verticillium wilt. Set plants 2 1/2 to 3 feet apart in rows that are 6 to 10 feet apart. Cut canes back to 4 to 6 inches high.

    December

    Plant when dormant in a light shade location that is well-draining. Plant in raised beds if the soil is heavy clay. Soil pH should be on the acidic side (6 to 6.5). Avoid planting where you grew tomatoes, eggplant, potatoes or peppers within the last three years, as these plants tend to infect the soil with verticillium wilt. Set plants 2 1/2 to 3 feet apart in rows that are 6 to 10 feet apart. Cut canes back to 4 to 6 inches high.

    Fertilize

    When should you fertilize this plant? Which kind of fertilizer do you recommend? Should you use different fertilizers at different times of year?

    March

    Feed once with an all-purpose organic 10-10-10 fertilizer.

    April

    Feed once with an all-purpose organic 10-10-10 fertilizer.

    May

    Feed once with an all-purpose organic 10-10-10 fertilizer.

    Water

    Is there a time to reduce or increase watering? Any special requirements? Things to avoid during certain times of the year?

    March

    Keep the soil around plants moist but not soggy. Avoid letting the soil dry out when the plant is flowering and fruiting.

    April

    Keep the soil around plants moist but not soggy. Avoid letting the soil dry out when the plant is flowering and fruiting.

    May

    Keep the soil around plants moist but not soggy. Avoid letting the soil dry out when the plant is flowering and fruiting.

    June

    Keep the soil around plants moist but not soggy. Avoid letting the soil dry out when the planting is flowering and fruiting.

    July

    Keep the soil around plants moist but not soggy. Avoid letting the soil dry out when the plant is flowering and fruiting.

    August

    Keep the soil around plants moist but not soggy. Avoid letting the soil dry out when the plant is flowering and fruiting.

    September

    Keep the soil around plants moist but not soggy. Avoid letting the soil dry out when the plant is flowering and fruiting.

    October

    Keep the soil around plants moist but not soggy. Avoid letting the soil dry out when the plant is flowering and fruiting.

    Prune

    When's a good time to prune this plant? How about deadheading, pinching back, trimming or any other grooming? Any special requirements?

    January

    For summer bearing raspberries: After planting, don't prune for the first year. Once they fruit, cut the canes back to the ground. The second year, canes will develop around the crown. Prune out everything but 7 to 10 of the strongest canes and attach them to the trellis. Before new growth appears in spring, cut canes back to 5 feet, which will encourage them to grow laterally.
    For everbearing raspberries: The first fall, they will produce fruit on the top 1/3 of the plant. After harvest, remove the portion of the plant that produced berries and let the lower part remain to produce the spring crop. In spring, after the canes have completely fruited, remove them completely. New canes that appear will produce the next crop.

    March

    For summer bearing raspberries: After planting, don't prune for the first year. Once they fruit, cut the canes back to the ground. The second year, canes will develop around the crown. Prune out everything but 7 to 10 of the strongest canes and attach them to the trellis. Before new growth appears in spring, cut canes back to 5 feet, which will encourage them to grow laterally.
    For everbearing raspberries: The first fall, they will produce fruit on the top 1/3 of the plant. After harvest, remove the portion of the plant that produced berries and let the lower part remain to produce the spring crop. In spring, after the canes have fruited, remove them completely. New canes that appear will produce the next crop.

    April

    For summer bearing raspberries: After planting, don't prune for the first year. Once they fruit, cut the canes back to the ground. The second year, canes will develop around the crown. Prune out everything but 7 to 10 of the strongest canes and attach them to the trellis. Before new growth appears in spring, cut canes back to 5 feet, which will encourage them to grow laterally.
    For everbearing raspberries: The first fall, they will produce fruit on the top 1/3 of the plant. After harvest, remove the portion of the plant that produced berries and let the lower part remain to produce the spring crop. In spring, after the canes have fruited, remove them completely. New canes that appear will produce the next crop.

    May

    For summer bearing raspberries: After planting, don't prune for the first year. Once they fruit, cut the canes back to the ground. The second year, canes will develop around the crown. Prune out everything but 7 to 10 of the strongest canes and attach them to the trellis. Before new growth appears in spring, cut canes back to 5 feet, which will encourage them to grow laterally.
    For everbearing raspberries: The first fall, they will produce fruit on the top 1/3 of the plant. After harvest, remove the portion of the plant that produced berries and let the lower part remain to produce the spring crop. In spring, after the canes have fruited, remove them completely. New canes that appear will produce the next crop.

    June

    For summer bearing raspberries: After planting, don't prune for the first year. Once they fruit, cut the canes back to the ground. The second year, canes will develop around the crown. Prune out everything but 7 to 10 of the strongest canes and attach them to the trellis. Before new growth appears in spring, cut canes back to 5 feet, which will encourage them to grow laterally.
    For everbearing raspberries: The first fall, they will produce fruit on the top 1/3 of the plant. After harvest, remove the portion of the plant that produced berries and let the lower part remain to produce the spring crop. In spring, after the canes have fruited, remove them completely. New canes that appear will produce the next crop.

    July

    For summer bearing raspberries: After planting, don't prune for the first year. Once they fruit, cut the canes back to the ground. The second year, canes will develop around the crown. Prune out everything but 7 to 10 of the strongest canes and attach them to the trellis. Before new growth appears in spring, cut canes back to 5 feet, which will encourage them to grow laterally.
    For everbearing raspberries: The first fall, they will produce fruit on the top 1/3 of the plant. After harvest, remove the portion of the plant that produced berries and let the lower part remain to produce the spring crop. In spring, after the canes have fruited, remove them completely. New canes that appear will produce the next crop.

    August

    For summer bearing raspberries: After planting, don't prune for the first year. Once they fruit, cut the canes back to the ground. The second year, canes will develop around the crown. Prune out everything but 7 to 10 of the strongest canes and attach them to the trellis. Before new growth appears in spring, cut canes back to 5 feet, which will encourage them to grow laterally.
    For everbearing raspberries: The first fall, they will produce fruit on the top 1/3 of the plant. After harvest, remove the portion of the plant that produced berries and let the lower part remain to produce the spring crop. In spring, after the canes have fruited, remove them completely. New canes that appear will produce the next crop.

    September

    For summer bearing raspberries: After planting, don't prune for the first year. Once they fruit, cut the canes back to the ground. The second year, canes will develop around the crown. Prune out everything but 7 to 10 of the strongest canes and attach them to the trellis. Before new growth appears in spring, cut canes back to 5 feet, which will encourage them to grow laterally.
    For everbearing raspberries: The first fall, they will produce fruit on the top 1/3 of the plant. After harvest, remove the portion of the plant that produced berries and let the lower part remain to produce the spring crop. In spring, after the canes have fruited, remove them completely. New canes that appear will produce the next crop.

    October

    For summer bearing raspberries: After planting, don't prune for the first year. Once they fruit, cut the canes back to the ground. The second year, canes will develop around the crown. Prune out everything but 7 to 10 of the strongest canes and attach them to the trellis. Before new growth appears in spring, cut canes back to 5 feet, which will encourage them to grow laterally.
    For everbearing raspberries: The first fall, they will produce fruit on the top 1/3 of the plant. After harvest, remove the portion of the plant that produced berries and let the lower part remain to produce the spring crop. In spring, after the canes have fruited, remove them completely. New canes that appear will produce the next crop.

    Mulch

    Does this plant need to be mulched? Are there specific types of Mulch which are better for this plant? How much?

    January

    Maintain a 2- to 3-inch layer of shredded bark in the planting bed, which will keep the soil moist and cool.

    February

    Maintain a 2- to 3-inch layer of shredded bark in the planting bed, which will keep the soil moist and cool.

    March

    Maintain a 2- to 3-inch layer of shredded bark in the planting bed, which will keep the soil moist and cool.

    April

    Maintain a 2- to 3-inch layer of shredded bark in the planting bed, which will keep the soil moist and cool.

    May

    Maintain a 2- to 3-inch layer of shredded bark in the planting bed, which will keep the soil moist and cool.

    June

    Maintain a 2- to 3-inch layer of shredded bark in the planting bed, which will keep the soil moist and cool.

    July

    Maintain a 2- to 3-inch layer of shredded bark in the planting bed, which will keep the soil moist and cool.

    August

    Maintain a 2- to 3-inch layer of shredded bark in the planting bed, which will keep the soil moist and cool.

    September

    Maintain a 2- to 3-inch layer of shredded bark in the planting bed, which will keep the soil moist and cool.

    October

    Maintain a 2- to 3-inch layer of shredded bark in the planting bed, which will keep the soil moist and cool.

    November

    Maintain a 2- to 3-inch layer of shredded bark in the planting bed, which will keep the soil moist and cool.

    December

    Maintain a 2- to 3-inch layer of shredded bark in the planting bed, which will keep the soil moist and cool.

    Pest/Disease Inspection

    What are the common problems this plant will face and when should you look for them to appear?

    January

    Check for signs of cane borers.

    February

    Check for signs of cane borers.

    March

    Check early in the month for signs of cane borers.

    April

    Check for spider mites and signs of fungal disease.

    May

    Check for spider mites and signs of fungal disease.

    June

    Check for spider mites and signs of fungal disease.

    July

    Check for spider mites and signs of fungal disease.

    August

    Check for spider mites and signs of fungal disease.

    September

    Check for spider mites and signs of fungal disease.

    October

    Check for spider mites and signs of fungal disease.

    November

    Check for signs of cane borers.

    December

    Check for signs of cane borers.

    Treat for Pest/Disease

    How do you treat the common problems for this plant? What products or concoctions or natural means do you use? Any special requirements?

    January

    Spray plants when dormant with lime sulfur to prevent fungal disease, as well as control cane borers and spider mites.

    February

    Spray plants when dormant with lime sulfur to prevent fungal disease, as well as control cane borers and spider mites.

    March

    Treat cane borers and spider mites with horticultural oil.

    April

    Treat cane borers and spider mites with horticultural oil.

    May

    Treat cane borers and spider mites with horticultural oil.

    June

    Treat cane borers and spider mites with horticultural oil.

    July

    Treat cane borers and spider mites with horticultural oil.

    August

    Treat cane borers and spider mites with horticultural oil.

    September

    Treat cane borers and spider mites with horticultural oil.

    October

    Treat cane borers and spider mites with horticultural oil.

    November

    Treat cane borers and spider mites with horticultural oil.

    December

    Spray plants when dormant with lime sulfur to prevent fungal disease, as well as control cane borers and spider mites.

    Harvest

    When's a good time to harvest this plant? What's the best way to harvest? Are there special requirements or features?

    April

    Harvest when the fruit is bright red and sweet.

    May

    Harvest when the fruit is bright red and sweet.

    June

    Harvest when the fruit is bright red and sweet.

    July

    Harvest when the fruit is bright red and sweet.

    August

    Harvest when the fruit is bright red and sweet.

    September

    Harvest when the fruit is bright red and sweet.

    Special requirements

    Any other requirement for this plant? Is there anything that doesn't fit into the other care categories?

    January

    Raspberries do best when trained on a trellis. String heavy wire between posts and train lateral side branches along wire.

    February

    Raspberries do best when trained on a trellis. String heavy wire between posts and train lateral side branches along wire.

    December

    Raspberries do best when trained on a trellis. String heavy wire between posts and train lateral side branches along wire.

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Dwarf Miniature & Small Daylillies for Containers

33072
Daylily
Hemerocallis is commonly called daylily becasue each trumpet shaped flower blooms for one…

Learn How to Create a California Friendly Garden

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Creating a California Friendly Garden
I’m convinced - gardeners love the outdoors, love nature and love the earth more than…

Plant Recommendations

Fremontodendron californicum
Plant Recommendations Christiane Holmquist

Shrubs - Southern California

Christiane Holmquist's Top Plant Recommendation: Favorite Shrubs for Southern California. 
Echeveria pulvinata
Plant Recommendations Debra Lee Baldwin

Succulents with Red or Orange-Red Leaves - Southern California

Debra Lee Baldwin's Top Plant Recommendation: Favorite Succulents with Red or Orange-Red Leaves for Southern California.

Supporting Pollinators: Bee-Friendly…

23506 Rhonda Hayes
Helianthus
Rhonda Fleming Hayes' Top Plant Recommendation: Favorite Supporting Pollinators:…

Butterfly Plants - Southern California

7232 Steve Brigham
Pentas lanceolata 'Crimson Star'
Steve Brigham's Top Plant Recommendations: Favorite Butterfly Plants for Southern…

Bulbs - Desert of Arizona

6726 Julie and Steve Plath
Narcissus
Julie Plath's Top Plant Recommendation: Favorite Bulbs for Deserts of Arizona.

Featured Plant Care

Plumeria Monthly Plant Care

Plumeria spp (Plumeria) - Monthly Plant Care Calendar

in Trees
You can have these monthly Plant Care Reminders sent directly to you each month!
Strawberries Plant Care

Strawberries (Fragaria X ananassa) - Monthly Plant Care Calendar

in Edibles
You can have these monthly Plant Care Reminders sent directly to you each month!
St. Catherine's Lace Monthly Plant Care

St. Catherine's Lace (Eriogonum giganteum) - Monthly Plant Care Calendar

You can have these monthly Plant Care Reminders sent directly to you each month!
Poinsettia tips

Poinsettia Pointers

in Shrubs
Last year, about 41 million poinsettias were sold in the United States.

Latest Articles

Edit Your Tagged Photos!

How to Edit or Remove A Plant "Tag" In Your Garden Photos

Instead of 'Tagging' your friends on Facebook, now you can 'Tag' your Plants in your…
Seed Starting

10 Easy Cut Flowers to Direct Sow

in Seeds
A cut-flower garden or "cutting garden" allows you to bring the beauty of your garden…

Popular Articles

Baseball Field Maintenance

Baseball Field Maintenance - A General Guide for Fields of All Levels

in Lawn
More great baseball field resources can be found here (including a pdf version of this…
Queen Palm Care & Use

The Queen Palm (Syagrus romanzoffiana) Care & Use

in Trees
Jungle Music Palms and Cycads is a family owned and operated business established in 1977
Microgreens

What are Microgreens and How to Grow Them

in Edibles
Microgreens are tiny leafed vegetables that are grown from seed and require very little…
Kahili Ginger Plant Care

Hedychium gardnerianum (Kahili Ginger) - Monthly Plant Care Calendar

You can have these monthly Plant Care Reminders sent directly to you each month!

User Guides (Slide)

Popular Recommendations (Slide)