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General Information

Plant Care Instructions By Julie Bawden-Davis

Summer squash variety with thin, green skin. Plants are prolific, producing fruit for many weeks. Requires room to grow.

Is Indoor Plant?

No

These month by month plant care tasks are for plants in the following zones :
Sunset Zones : 22, 23, 24
USDA Zones : 10a, 10b
Web Link - For more information

Plant Care Instruction

  • Scroll down or click on any month for plant care instructions
    • January
    • February
    • March
    • April
    • May
    • June
    • July
    • August
    • September
    January
    1. Buy

    Buy seed when available via mail-order or at the nursery.
    February
    1. Buy

    Buy seed when available via mail-order or at the nursery.
    2. Sow Seeds

    Sow seed indoors and keep moist. When seed sprouts, grow in a sunny window.
    March
    1. Buy

    Buy seed when available via mail-order or at the nursery.
    2. Sow Seeds

    Sow seed indoors and keep moist. When seed sprouts, grow in a sunny window.
    April
    1. Buy

    Buy seed via mail-order or at the nursery. Purchase plants when they appear in the nursery.
    2. Plant

    Plant starting mid-month in a rich, well-drained soil in a full-sun location with good air circulation. Space plants 4 to 5 feet apart.
    3. Sow Seeds

    After mid-month, sow seed outdoors in containers for transplanting later, or directly in the garden. Seed-starting mix should be well-draining. Ground location requires full-sun, good air circulation and rich, well-draining soil.
    4. Fertilize

    After plants become established, feed once this month with an organic vegetable fertilizer.
    5. Water

    Keep the soil most but not soggy. Droughted plants will stop producing. Foliage is susceptible to fungal infection, so avoid splashing water onto leaves when watering.
    6. Mulch

    Apply a 1- to 2-inch layer of compost or shredded bark to the base of the plant, spreading out 1 to 2 feet.
    7. Pest/Disease Inspection

    Check for squash bug, which will feed on plant vines and fruit and cause leaves to wilt. Also look for signs of powdery mildew, which is a powdery coating that appears on leaves.
    8. Treat for Pest/Disease

    Control squash bugs by destroying their eggs, which are yellow-to-brown clusters that appear on the underside of leaves. Trap adults under boards or newspapers at night and then collect and destroy them in the morning. There are also insecticides labeled for use on squash bugs. Control powdery mildew by avoiding overhead watering and getting squash leaves wet, especially later in the day.
    9. Transplant

    Transplant seedlings starting mid-month in a rich, well-drained soil in a full-sun location with good air circulation. Space plants 4 to 5 feet apart.
    May
    1. Buy

    Buy seed via mail-order or at the nursery. Purchase plants from the nursery.
    2. Plant

    Plant in a rich, well-drained soil in a full-sun location with good air circulation. Space plants 4 to 5 feet apart.
    3. Sow Seeds

    Sow seed outdoors in containers for transplanting later, or directly in the garden. Seed-starting mix should be well-draining. Ground location requires full-sun, good air circulation and rich, well-draining soil.
    4. Fertilize

    After plants become established, feed every 3 weeks with an organic vegetable fertilizer.
    5. Water

    Keep the soil most but not soggy. Droughted plants will stop producing. Foliage is susceptible to fungal infection, so avoid splashing water onto leaves when watering.
    6. Mulch

    Maintain a 1- to 2-inch layer of compost or shredded bark to the base of the plant, spreading out 1 to 2 feet.
    7. Pest/Disease Inspection

    Check for squash bug, which will feed on plant vines and fruit and cause leaves to wilt. Also look for signs of powdery mildew, which is a powdery coating that appears on leaves.
    8. Treat for Pest/Disease

    Control squash bugs by destroying their eggs, which are yellow-to-brown clusters that appear on the underside of leaves. Trap adults under boards or newspapers at night and then collect and destroy them in the morning. There are also insecticides labeled for use on squash bugs. Control powdery mildew by avoiding overhead watering and getting squash leaves wet, especially later in the day.
    9. Transplant

    Transplant seedlings in a rich, well-drained soil in a full-sun location with good air circulation. Space plants 4 to 5 feet apart.
    10. Harvest

    Harvest zucchini when it is small- to medium-sized, at which point it is tender. Although you can allow the fruit to grow large, doing so may cause the plant to cease production.
    June
    1. Buy

    Purchase plants from the nursery.
    2. Plant

    Plant in a rich, well-drained soil in a full-sun location with good air circulation. Space plants 4 to 5 feet apart.
    3. Sow Seeds

    Sow seed outdoors in containers for transplanting later, or directly in the garden. Seed-starting mix should be well-draining. Ground location requires full-sun, good air circulation and rich, well-draining soil.
    4. Fertilize

    Feed every 3 weeks with an organic vegetable fertilizer.
    5. Water

    Keep the soil most but not soggy. Droughted plants will stop producing. Foliage is susceptible to fungal infection, so avoid splashing water onto leaves when watering.
    6. Mulch

    Maintain a 1- to 2-inch layer of compost or shredded bark to the base of the plant, spreading out 1 to 2 feet.
    7. Pest/Disease Inspection

    Check for squash bug, which will feed on plant vines and fruit and cause leaves to wilt. Also look for signs of powdery mildew, which is a powdery coating that appears on leaves.
    8. Treat for Pest/Disease

    Control squash bugs by destroying their eggs, which are yellow-to-brown clusters that appear on the underside of leaves. Trap adults under boards or newspapers at night and then collect and destroy them in the morning. There are also insecticides labeled for use on squash bugs. Control powdery mildew by avoiding overhead watering and getting squash leaves wet, especially later in the day.
    9. Transplant

    Transplant seedlings in a rich, well-drained soil in a full-sun location with good air circulation. Space plants 4 to 5 feet apart.
    10. Harvest

    Harvest zucchini when it is small- to medium-sized, at which point it is tender. Although you can allow the fruit to grow large, doing so may cause the plant to cease production.
    July
    1. Buy

    Purchase plants from the nursery.
    2. Plant

    Plant in a rich, well-drained soil in a full-sun location with good air circulation. Space plants 4 to 5 feet apart.
    3. Fertilize

    Feed every 3 weeks with an organic vegetable fertilizer.
    4. Water

    Keep the soil most but not soggy. Droughted plants will stop producing. Foliage is susceptible to fungal infection, so avoid splashing water onto leaves when watering.
    5. Mulch

    Maintain a 1- to 2-inch layer of compost or shredded bark to the base of the plant, spreading out 1 to 2 feet.
    6. Pest/Disease Inspection

    Check for squash bug, which will feed on plant vines and fruit and cause leaves to wilt. Also look for signs of powdery mildew, which is a powdery coating that appears on leaves.
    7. Treat for Pest/Disease

    Control squash bugs by destroying their eggs, which are yellow-to-brown clusters that appear on the underside of leaves. Trap adults under boards or newspapers at night and then collect and destroy them in the morning. There are also insecticides labeled for use on squash bugs. Control powdery mildew by avoiding overhead watering and getting squash leaves wet, especially later in the day.
    8. Transplant

    Transplant seedlings in a rich, well-drained soil in a full-sun location with good air circulation. Space plants 4 to 5 feet apart.
    9. Harvest

    Harvest zucchini when it is small- to medium-sized, at which point it is tender. Although you can allow the fruit to grow large, doing so may cause the plant to cease production.
    August
    1. Fertilize

    Feed every 3 weeks with an organic vegetable fertilizer.
    2. Water

    Keep the soil most but not soggy. Droughted plants will stop producing. Foliage is susceptible to fungal infection, so avoid splashing water onto leaves when watering.
    3. Mulch

    Maintain a 1- to 2-inch layer of compost or shredded bark to the base of the plant, spreading out 1 to 2 feet.
    4. Pest/Disease Inspection

    Check for squash bug, which will feed on plant vines and fruit and cause leaves to wilt. Also look for signs of powdery mildew, which is a powdery coating that appears on leaves.
    5. Treat for Pest/Disease

    Control squash bugs by destroying their eggs, which are yellow-to-brown clusters that appear on the underside of leaves. Trap adults under boards or newspapers at night and then collect and destroy them in the morning. There are also insecticides labeled for use on squash bugs. Control powdery mildew by avoiding overhead watering and getting squash leaves wet, especially later in the day.
    6. Harvest

    Harvest zucchini when it is small- to medium-sized, at which point it is tender. Although you can allow the fruit to grow large, doing so may cause the plant to cease production.
    September
    1. Water

    Keep the soil most but not soggy. Droughted plants will stop producing. Foliage is susceptible to fungal infection, so avoid splashing water onto leaves when watering.
    2. Mulch

    Maintain a 1- to 2-inch layer of compost or shredded bark to the base of the plant, spreading out 1 to 2 feet.
    3. Harvest

    Harvest zucchini when it is small- to medium-sized, at which point it is tender. Although you can allow the fruit to grow large, doing so may cause the plant to cease production.
  • Buy

    When's the best time to buy this plant? When can you buy these from seed (if you can)? When is it usually available? What are things to look for when you're buying it? Or anything other tidbit of information you can share!

    January

    Buy seed when available via mail-order or at the nursery.

    February

    Buy seed when available via mail-order or at the nursery.

    March

    Buy seed when available via mail-order or at the nursery.

    April

    Buy seed via mail-order or at the nursery. Purchase plants when they appear in the nursery.

    May

    Buy seed via mail-order or at the nursery. Purchase plants from the nursery.

    June

    Purchase plants from the nursery.

    July

    Purchase plants from the nursery.

    Plant

    When's a good time to plant this plant or bulb? Any special planting instructions?

    April

    Plant starting mid-month in a rich, well-drained soil in a full-sun location with good air circulation. Space plants 4 to 5 feet apart.

    May

    Plant in a rich, well-drained soil in a full-sun location with good air circulation. Space plants 4 to 5 feet apart.

    June

    Plant in a rich, well-drained soil in a full-sun location with good air circulation. Space plants 4 to 5 feet apart.

    July

    Plant in a rich, well-drained soil in a full-sun location with good air circulation. Space plants 4 to 5 feet apart.

    August

    Plant in a rich, well-drained soil in a full-sun location with good air circulation. Space plants 4 to 5 feet apart.

    Sow Seeds

    When can you plant these seeds? When's the best time? Can you start them indoors and move them out? Do they have any special requirements?

    February

    Sow seed indoors and keep moist. When seed sprouts, grow in a sunny window.

    March

    Sow seed indoors and keep moist. When seed sprouts, grow in a sunny window.

    April

    After mid-month, sow seed outdoors in containers for transplanting later, or directly in the garden. Seed-starting mix should be well-draining. Ground location requires full-sun, good air circulation and rich, well-draining soil.

    May

    Sow seed outdoors in containers for transplanting later, or directly in the garden. Seed-starting mix should be well-draining. Ground location requires full-sun, good air circulation and rich, well-draining soil.

    June

    Sow seed outdoors in containers for transplanting later, or directly in the garden. Seed-starting mix should be well-draining. Ground location requires full-sun, good air circulation and rich, well-draining soil.

    Fertilize

    When should you fertilize this plant? Which kind of fertilizer do you recommend? Should you use different fertilizers at different times of year?

    April

    After plants become established, feed once this month with an organic vegetable fertilizer.

    May

    After plants become established, feed every 3 weeks with an organic vegetable fertilizer.

    June

    Feed every 3 weeks with an organic vegetable fertilizer.

    July

    Feed every 3 weeks with an organic vegetable fertilizer.

    August

    Feed every 3 weeks with an organic vegetable fertilizer.

    Water

    Is there a time to reduce or increase watering? Any special requirements? Things to avoid during certain times of the year?

    April

    Keep the soil most but not soggy. Droughted plants will stop producing. Foliage is susceptible to fungal infection, so avoid splashing water onto leaves when watering.

    May

    Keep the soil most but not soggy. Droughted plants will stop producing. Foliage is susceptible to fungal infection, so avoid splashing water onto leaves when watering.

    June

    Keep the soil most but not soggy. Droughted plants will stop producing. Foliage is susceptible to fungal infection, so avoid splashing water onto leaves when watering.

    July

    Keep the soil most but not soggy. Droughted plants will stop producing. Foliage is susceptible to fungal infection, so avoid splashing water onto leaves when watering.

    August

    Keep the soil most but not soggy. Droughted plants will stop producing. Foliage is susceptible to fungal infection, so avoid splashing water onto leaves when watering.

    September

    Keep the soil most but not soggy. Droughted plants will stop producing. Foliage is susceptible to fungal infection, so avoid splashing water onto leaves when watering.

    Mulch

    Does this plant need to be mulched? Are there specific types of Mulch which are better for this plant? How much?

    April

    Apply a 1- to 2-inch layer of compost or shredded bark to the base of the plant, spreading out 1 to 2 feet.

    May

    Maintain a 1- to 2-inch layer of compost or shredded bark to the base of the plant, spreading out 1 to 2 feet.

    June

    Maintain a 1- to 2-inch layer of compost or shredded bark to the base of the plant, spreading out 1 to 2 feet.

    July

    Maintain a 1- to 2-inch layer of compost or shredded bark to the base of the plant, spreading out 1 to 2 feet.

    August

    Maintain a 1- to 2-inch layer of compost or shredded bark to the base of the plant, spreading out 1 to 2 feet.

    September

    Maintain a 1- to 2-inch layer of compost or shredded bark to the base of the plant, spreading out 1 to 2 feet.

    Pest/Disease Inspection

    What are the common problems this plant will face and when should you look for them to appear?

    April

    Check for squash bug, which will feed on plant vines and fruit and cause leaves to wilt. Also look for signs of powdery mildew, which is a powdery coating that appears on leaves.

    May

    Check for squash bug, which will feed on plant vines and fruit and cause leaves to wilt. Also look for signs of powdery mildew, which is a powdery coating that appears on leaves.

    June

    Check for squash bug, which will feed on plant vines and fruit and cause leaves to wilt. Also look for signs of powdery mildew, which is a powdery coating that appears on leaves.

    July

    Check for squash bug, which will feed on plant vines and fruit and cause leaves to wilt. Also look for signs of powdery mildew, which is a powdery coating that appears on leaves.

    August

    Check for squash bug, which will feed on plant vines and fruit and cause leaves to wilt. Also look for signs of powdery mildew, which is a powdery coating that appears on leaves.

    Treat for Pest/Disease

    How do you treat the common problems for this plant? What products or concoctions or natural means do you use? Any special requirements?

    April

    Control squash bugs by destroying their eggs, which are yellow-to-brown clusters that appear on the underside of leaves. Trap adults under boards or newspapers at night and then collect and destroy them in the morning. There are also insecticides labeled for use on squash bugs. Control powdery mildew by avoiding overhead watering and getting squash leaves wet, especially later in the day.

    May

    Control squash bugs by destroying their eggs, which are yellow-to-brown clusters that appear on the underside of leaves. Trap adults under boards or newspapers at night and then collect and destroy them in the morning. There are also insecticides labeled for use on squash bugs. Control powdery mildew by avoiding overhead watering and getting squash leaves wet, especially later in the day.

    June

    Control squash bugs by destroying their eggs, which are yellow-to-brown clusters that appear on the underside of leaves. Trap adults under boards or newspapers at night and then collect and destroy them in the morning. There are also insecticides labeled for use on squash bugs. Control powdery mildew by avoiding overhead watering and getting squash leaves wet, especially later in the day.

    July

    Control squash bugs by destroying their eggs, which are yellow-to-brown clusters that appear on the underside of leaves. Trap adults under boards or newspapers at night and then collect and destroy them in the morning. There are also insecticides labeled for use on squash bugs. Control powdery mildew by avoiding overhead watering and getting squash leaves wet, especially later in the day.

    August

    Control squash bugs by destroying their eggs, which are yellow-to-brown clusters that appear on the underside of leaves. Trap adults under boards or newspapers at night and then collect and destroy them in the morning. There are also insecticides labeled for use on squash bugs. Control powdery mildew by avoiding overhead watering and getting squash leaves wet, especially later in the day.

    Transplant

    When's the best time to dig up and transplant this from one spot to another? (This is different than planting). Any special requirements?

    April

    Transplant seedlings starting mid-month in a rich, well-drained soil in a full-sun location with good air circulation. Space plants 4 to 5 feet apart.

    May

    Transplant seedlings in a rich, well-drained soil in a full-sun location with good air circulation. Space plants 4 to 5 feet apart.

    June

    Transplant seedlings in a rich, well-drained soil in a full-sun location with good air circulation. Space plants 4 to 5 feet apart.

    July

    Transplant seedlings in a rich, well-drained soil in a full-sun location with good air circulation. Space plants 4 to 5 feet apart.

    Harvest

    When's a good time to harvest this plant? What's the best way to harvest? Are there special requirements or features?

    May

    Harvest zucchini when it is small- to medium-sized, at which point it is tender. Although you can allow the fruit to grow large, doing so may cause the plant to cease production.

    June

    Harvest zucchini when it is small- to medium-sized, at which point it is tender. Although you can allow the fruit to grow large, doing so may cause the plant to cease production.

    July

    Harvest zucchini when it is small- to medium-sized, at which point it is tender. Although you can allow the fruit to grow large, doing so may cause the plant to cease production.

    August

    Harvest zucchini when it is small- to medium-sized, at which point it is tender. Although you can allow the fruit to grow large, doing so may cause the plant to cease production.

    September

    Harvest zucchini when it is small- to medium-sized, at which point it is tender. Although you can allow the fruit to grow large, doing so may cause the plant to cease production.

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