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General Information

Plant Care Instructions By Steve Brigham

As a group, roses are the most popular shrubs of all in temperate climates worldwide. California is a great place to grow roses, especially because of its mild-winter climates, where some roses seem to always be in bloom. \"Roses\" is a big category, and there are many different kinds. In general, all roses like sun, good soil, good air circulation, and regular water and fertilizer. Since they bloom on new growth, they also need a certain amount of pruning in order to produce the most flowers -- but it\'s probably true that most people prune their roses too heavily. Mostly, it\'s the cut-flower \"hybrid teas\" that need a seasonal pruning -- the many popular shrubby landscape roses generally don\'t need much cutting back. And even with the hybrid teas, consider that when you cut your blooms for bouquets, you\'re really accomplishing your pruning chores at the same time. Just remember that a big shrub produces more flowers, so do give your roses a seasonal haircut with just a little thinning, but don\'t overdo it (and remember to wear your gardening gloves when you do!).

Is Indoor Plant?

No

These month by month plant care tasks are for plants in the following zones :
Sunset Zones : 7, 8, 914, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24
USDA Zones :
Web Link - For more information

Plant Care Instruction

  • Scroll down or click on any month for plant care instructions
    • January
    • February
    • March
    • April
    • May
    • June
    • July
    • August
    • September
    • October
    • November
    January
    1. Buy

    Bare-root roses are good value and easy to plant. Buy large #1 size plants, and you\'ll get lots of flowers the first year. Shop early in the bare-root season for the best selection and freshest plants.
    2. Plant

    Plant bare-root roses soon after you buy them, and soak them for a couple hours in a bucket of water before you do. Pick a spot in full sun (a little afternoon shade in hot climates is fine) in well-drained soil, with good air circulation, and amend the soil with organic material and a balanced fertilizer. On grafted plants, plant so that the graft union (knob) is just above soil level. Make a generous watering basin around your new plants, and water thoroughly.
    3. Prune

    Prune hybrid teas in winter, before new growth begins, to remove dead and older, unproductive canes. Cut back healthy canes by one third, making cuts just above outward facing buds. Many shrubs and climbers, however, do not need radical annual pruning, and may simply be cut back lightly either in winter or after spring bloom.
    4. Transplant

    With care, established roses may be moved during bare-root season, before new growth appears.
    February
    1. Buy

    Bare-root roses are good value and easy to plant. Buy large #1 size plants, and you\'ll get lots of flowers the first year. Shop early in the bare-root season for the best selection and freshest plants.
    2. Plant

    Plant bare-root roses soon after you buy them, and soak them for a couple hours in a bucket of water before you do. Pick a spot in full sun (a little afternoon shade in hot climates is fine) in well-drained soil, with good air circulation, and amend the soil with organic material and a balanced fertilizer. On grafted plants, plant so that the graft union (knob) is just above soil level. Make a generous watering basin around your new plants, and water thoroughly.
    3. Fertilize

    Feed with a balanced fertilizer in February, and again after each bloom cycle. Hybrid teas grown for cut flowers need feeding more than shrubby roses do.
    4. Water

    Water regularly and thoroughly as necessary during the growing season. Wash off foliage (morning is best) with a spray of water on a regular basis to promote healthy growth.
    5. Prune

    Prune hybrid teas in winter, before new growth begins, to remove dead and older, unproductive canes. Cut back healthy canes by one third, making cuts just above outward facing buds. Many shrubs and climbers, however, do not need radical annual pruning, and may simply be cut back lightly either in winter or after spring bloom.
    6. Mulch

    Mulch to conserve water use and keep roots cool.
    7. Transplant

    With care, established roses may be moved during bare-root season, before new growth appears.
    March
    1. Buy

    Bare-root roses are good value and easy to plant. Buy large #1 size plants, and you\'ll get lots of flowers the first year. Shop early in the bare-root season for the best selection and freshest plants. You can also buy roses in the spring, after they have been established in pots. Buy them in 3 or 5-gallon sized containers, since smaller pots usually means that too much root-pruning has been done.
    2. Plant

    Plant bare-root roses soon after you buy them, and soak them for a couple hours in a bucket of water before you do. Container-grown plants may be planted at any time. Pick a spot in full sun (a little afternoon shade in hot climates is fine) in well-drained soil, with good air circulation, and amend the soil with organic material and a balanced fertilizer. On grafted plants, plant so that the graft union (knob) is just above soil level. Make a generous watering basin around your new plants, and water thoroughly.
    3. Water

    Water regularly and thoroughly as necessary during the growing season. Wash off foliage (morning is best) with a spray of water on a regular basis to promote healthy growth.
    4. Prune

    Prune hybrid teas in winter, before new growth begins, to remove dead and older, unproductive canes. Cut back healthy canes by one third, making cuts just above outward facing buds. Many shrubs and climbers, however, do not need radical annual pruning, and may simply be cut back lightly either in winter or after spring bloom.
    5. Pest/Disease Inspection

    Watch for pests and leaf diseases throughout the growing season.
    6. Treat for Pest/Disease

    A good spray of water in early morning can be effective in controlling small insects and even some leaf diseases. If pests and diseases are a big problem, systemic rose care products can be of help.
    April
    1. Buy

    You can also buy roses in the spring, after they have been established in pots. Buy them in 3 or 5-gallon sized containers, since smaller pots usually means that too much root-pruning has been done.
    2. Plant

    Container-grown plants may be planted at any time. Pick a spot in full sun (a little afternoon shade in hot climates is fine) in well-drained soil, with good air circulation, and amend the soil with organic material and a balanced fertilizer. On grafted plants, plant so that the graft union (knob) is just above soil level. Make a generous watering basin around your new plants, and water thoroughly.
    3. Water

    Water regularly and thoroughly as necessary during the growing season. Wash off foliage (morning is best) with a spray of water on a regular basis to promote healthy growth.
    4. Pest/Disease Inspection

    Watch for pests and leaf diseases throughout the growing season.
    5. Treat for Pest/Disease

    A good spray of water in early morning can be effective in controlling small insects and even some leaf diseases. If pests and diseases are a big problem, systemic rose care products can be of help.
    May
    1. Buy

    You can also buy roses in the spring, after they have been established in pots. Buy them in 3 or 5-gallon sized containers, since smaller pots usually means that too much root-pruning has been done.
    2. Plant

    Container-grown plants may be planted at any time. Pick a spot in full sun (a little afternoon shade in hot climates is fine) in well-drained soil, with good air circulation, and amend the soil with organic material and a balanced fertilizer. On grafted plants, plant so that the graft union (knob) is just above soil level. Make a generous watering basin around your new plants, and water thoroughly.
    3. Fertilize

    Feed with a balanced fertilizer after each bloom cycle. Hybrid teas grown for cut flowers need feeding more than shrubby roses do.
    4. Water

    Water regularly and thoroughly as necessary during the growing season. Wash off foliage (morning is best) with a spray of water on a regular basis to promote healthy growth.
    5. Prune

    Cutting flowers for bouquets promotes more flowers later, as does deadheading any seed pods that form.
    6. Mulch

    Mulch to conserve water use and keep roots cool.
    7. Pest/Disease Inspection

    Watch for pests and leaf diseases throughout the growing season.
    8. Treat for Pest/Disease

    A good spray of water in early morning can be effective in controlling small insects and even some leaf diseases. If pests and diseases are a big problem, systemic rose care products can be of help.
    June
    1. Buy

    You can also buy roses in the spring, after they have been established in pots. Buy them in 3 or 5-gallon sized containers, since smaller pots usually means that too much root-pruning has been done.
    2. Plant

    Container-grown plants may be planted at any time. Pick a spot in full sun (a little afternoon shade in hot climates is fine) in well-drained soil, with good air circulation, and amend the soil with organic material and a balanced fertilizer. On grafted plants, plant so that the graft union (knob) is just above soil level. Make a generous watering basin around your new plants, and water thoroughly.
    3. Water

    Water regularly and thoroughly as necessary during the growing season. Wash off foliage (morning is best) with a spray of water on a regular basis to promote healthy growth.
    4. Prune

    Cutting flowers for bouquets promotes more flowers later, as does deadheading any seed pods that form.
    5. Pest/Disease Inspection

    Watch for pests and leaf diseases throughout the growing season.
    6. Treat for Pest/Disease

    A good spray of water in early morning can be effective in controlling small insects and even some leaf diseases. If pests and diseases are a big problem, systemic rose care products can be of help.
    July
    1. Water

    Water regularly and thoroughly as necessary during the growing season. Wash off foliage (morning is best) with a spray of water on a regular basis to promote healthy growth.
    2. Prune

    Cutting flowers for bouquets promotes more flowers later, as does deadheading any seed pods that form.
    3. Pest/Disease Inspection

    Watch for pests and leaf diseases throughout the growing season.
    4. Treat for Pest/Disease

    A good spray of water in early morning can be effective in controlling small insects and even some leaf diseases. If pests and diseases are a big problem, systemic rose care products can be of help.
    August
    1. Fertilize

    Feed with a balanced fertilizer after each bloom cycle. Hybrid teas grown for cut flowers need feeding more than shrubby roses do.
    2. Water

    Water regularly and thoroughly as necessary during the growing season. Wash off foliage (morning is best) with a spray of water on a regular basis to promote healthy growth.
    3. Prune

    Cutting flowers for bouquets promotes more flowers later, as does deadheading any seed pods that form.
    4. Pest/Disease Inspection

    Watch for pests and leaf diseases throughout the growing season.
    5. Treat for Pest/Disease

    A good spray of water in early morning can be effective in controlling small insects and even some leaf diseases. If pests and diseases are a big problem, systemic rose care products can be of help.
    September
    1. Water

    Water regularly and thoroughly as necessary during the growing season. Wash off foliage (morning is best) with a spray of water on a regular basis to promote healthy growth.
    2. Prune

    Cutting flowers for bouquets promotes more flowers later, as does deadheading any seed pods that form.
    3. Mulch

    Mulch to conserve water use and keep roots cool.
    4. Pest/Disease Inspection

    Watch for pests and leaf diseases throughout the growing season.
    5. Treat for Pest/Disease

    A good spray of water in early morning can be effective in controlling small insects and even some leaf diseases. If pests and diseases are a big problem, systemic rose care products can be of help.
    October
    1. Water

    Water regularly and thoroughly as necessary during the growing season. Wash off foliage (morning is best) with a spray of water on a regular basis to promote healthy growth.
    2. Prune

    Cutting flowers for bouquets promotes more flowers later, as does deadheading any seed pods that form.
    3. Pest/Disease Inspection

    Watch for pests and leaf diseases throughout the growing season.
    4. Treat for Pest/Disease

    A good spray of water in early morning can be effective in controlling small insects and even some leaf diseases. If pests and diseases are a big problem, systemic rose care products can be of help.
    November
    1. Water

    Water regularly and thoroughly as necessary during the growing season. Wash off foliage (morning is best) with a spray of water on a regular basis to promote healthy growth.
  • Buy

    When's the best time to buy this plant? When can you buy these from seed (if you can)? When is it usually available? What are things to look for when you're buying it? Or anything other tidbit of information you can share!

    January

    Bare-root roses are good value and easy to plant. Buy large #1 size plants, and you\'ll get lots of flowers the first year. Shop early in the bare-root season for the best selection and freshest plants.

    February

    Bare-root roses are good value and easy to plant. Buy large #1 size plants, and you\'ll get lots of flowers the first year. Shop early in the bare-root season for the best selection and freshest plants.

    March

    Bare-root roses are good value and easy to plant. Buy large #1 size plants, and you\'ll get lots of flowers the first year. Shop early in the bare-root season for the best selection and freshest plants. You can also buy roses in the spring, after they have been established in pots. Buy them in 3 or 5-gallon sized containers, since smaller pots usually means that too much root-pruning has been done.

    April

    You can also buy roses in the spring, after they have been established in pots. Buy them in 3 or 5-gallon sized containers, since smaller pots usually means that too much root-pruning has been done.

    May

    You can also buy roses in the spring, after they have been established in pots. Buy them in 3 or 5-gallon sized containers, since smaller pots usually means that too much root-pruning has been done.

    June

    You can also buy roses in the spring, after they have been established in pots. Buy them in 3 or 5-gallon sized containers, since smaller pots usually means that too much root-pruning has been done.

    Plant

    When's a good time to plant this plant or bulb? Any special planting instructions?

    January

    Plant bare-root roses soon after you buy them, and soak them for a couple hours in a bucket of water before you do. Pick a spot in full sun (a little afternoon shade in hot climates is fine) in well-drained soil, with good air circulation, and amend the soil with organic material and a balanced fertilizer. On grafted plants, plant so that the graft union (knob) is just above soil level. Make a generous watering basin around your new plants, and water thoroughly.

    February

    Plant bare-root roses soon after you buy them, and soak them for a couple hours in a bucket of water before you do. Pick a spot in full sun (a little afternoon shade in hot climates is fine) in well-drained soil, with good air circulation, and amend the soil with organic material and a balanced fertilizer. On grafted plants, plant so that the graft union (knob) is just above soil level. Make a generous watering basin around your new plants, and water thoroughly.

    March

    Plant bare-root roses soon after you buy them, and soak them for a couple hours in a bucket of water before you do. Container-grown plants may be planted at any time. Pick a spot in full sun (a little afternoon shade in hot climates is fine) in well-drained soil, with good air circulation, and amend the soil with organic material and a balanced fertilizer. On grafted plants, plant so that the graft union (knob) is just above soil level. Make a generous watering basin around your new plants, and water thoroughly.

    April

    Container-grown plants may be planted at any time. Pick a spot in full sun (a little afternoon shade in hot climates is fine) in well-drained soil, with good air circulation, and amend the soil with organic material and a balanced fertilizer. On grafted plants, plant so that the graft union (knob) is just above soil level. Make a generous watering basin around your new plants, and water thoroughly.

    May

    Container-grown plants may be planted at any time. Pick a spot in full sun (a little afternoon shade in hot climates is fine) in well-drained soil, with good air circulation, and amend the soil with organic material and a balanced fertilizer. On grafted plants, plant so that the graft union (knob) is just above soil level. Make a generous watering basin around your new plants, and water thoroughly.

    June

    Container-grown plants may be planted at any time. Pick a spot in full sun (a little afternoon shade in hot climates is fine) in well-drained soil, with good air circulation, and amend the soil with organic material and a balanced fertilizer. On grafted plants, plant so that the graft union (knob) is just above soil level. Make a generous watering basin around your new plants, and water thoroughly.

    Fertilize

    When should you fertilize this plant? Which kind of fertilizer do you recommend? Should you use different fertilizers at different times of year?

    February

    Feed with a balanced fertilizer in February, and again after each bloom cycle. Hybrid teas grown for cut flowers need feeding more than shrubby roses do.

    May

    Feed with a balanced fertilizer after each bloom cycle. Hybrid teas grown for cut flowers need feeding more than shrubby roses do.

    August

    Feed with a balanced fertilizer after each bloom cycle. Hybrid teas grown for cut flowers need feeding more than shrubby roses do.

    Water

    Is there a time to reduce or increase watering? Any special requirements? Things to avoid during certain times of the year?

    January

    Water regularly and thoroughly d

    February

    Water regularly and thoroughly as necessary during the growing season. Wash off foliage (morning is best) with a spray of water on a regular basis to promote healthy growth.

    March

    Water regularly and thoroughly as necessary during the growing season. Wash off foliage (morning is best) with a spray of water on a regular basis to promote healthy growth.

    April

    Water regularly and thoroughly as necessary during the growing season. Wash off foliage (morning is best) with a spray of water on a regular basis to promote healthy growth.

    May

    Water regularly and thoroughly as necessary during the growing season. Wash off foliage (morning is best) with a spray of water on a regular basis to promote healthy growth.

    June

    Water regularly and thoroughly as necessary during the growing season. Wash off foliage (morning is best) with a spray of water on a regular basis to promote healthy growth.

    July

    Water regularly and thoroughly as necessary during the growing season. Wash off foliage (morning is best) with a spray of water on a regular basis to promote healthy growth.

    August

    Water regularly and thoroughly as necessary during the growing season. Wash off foliage (morning is best) with a spray of water on a regular basis to promote healthy growth.

    September

    Water regularly and thoroughly as necessary during the growing season. Wash off foliage (morning is best) with a spray of water on a regular basis to promote healthy growth.

    October

    Water regularly and thoroughly as necessary during the growing season. Wash off foliage (morning is best) with a spray of water on a regular basis to promote healthy growth.

    November

    Water regularly and thoroughly as necessary during the growing season. Wash off foliage (morning is best) with a spray of water on a regular basis to promote healthy growth.

    Prune

    When's a good time to prune this plant? How about deadheading, pinching back, trimming or any other grooming? Any special requirements?

    January

    Prune hybrid teas in winter, before new growth begins, to remove dead and older, unproductive canes. Cut back healthy canes by one third, making cuts just above outward facing buds. Many shrubs and climbers, however, do not need radical annual pruning, and may simply be cut back lightly either in winter or after spring bloom.

    February

    Prune hybrid teas in winter, before new growth begins, to remove dead and older, unproductive canes. Cut back healthy canes by one third, making cuts just above outward facing buds. Many shrubs and climbers, however, do not need radical annual pruning, and may simply be cut back lightly either in winter or after spring bloom.

    March

    Prune hybrid teas in winter, before new growth begins, to remove dead and older, unproductive canes. Cut back healthy canes by one third, making cuts just above outward facing buds. Many shrubs and climbers, however, do not need radical annual pruning, and may simply be cut back lightly either in winter or after spring bloom.

    May

    Cutting flowers for bouquets promotes more flowers later, as does deadheading any seed pods that form.

    June

    Cutting flowers for bouquets promotes more flowers later, as does deadheading any seed pods that form.

    July

    Cutting flowers for bouquets promotes more flowers later, as does deadheading any seed pods that form.

    August

    Cutting flowers for bouquets promotes more flowers later, as does deadheading any seed pods that form.

    September

    Cutting flowers for bouquets promotes more flowers later, as does deadheading any seed pods that form.

    October

    Cutting flowers for bouquets promotes more flowers later, as does deadheading any seed pods that form.

    Mulch

    Does this plant need to be mulched? Are there specific types of Mulch which are better for this plant? How much?

    February

    Mulch to conserve water use and keep roots cool.

    May

    Mulch to conserve water use and keep roots cool.

    September

    Mulch to conserve water use and keep roots cool.

    Pest/Disease Inspection

    What are the common problems this plant will face and when should you look for them to appear?

    March

    Watch for pests and leaf diseases throughout the growing season.

    April

    Watch for pests and leaf diseases throughout the growing season.

    May

    Watch for pests and leaf diseases throughout the growing season.

    June

    Watch for pests and leaf diseases throughout the growing season.

    July

    Watch for pests and leaf diseases throughout the growing season.

    August

    Watch for pests and leaf diseases throughout the growing season.

    September

    Watch for pests and leaf diseases throughout the growing season.

    October

    Watch for pests and leaf diseases throughout the growing season.

    Treat for Pest/Disease

    How do you treat the common problems for this plant? What products or concoctions or natural means do you use? Any special requirements?

    March

    A good spray of water in early morning can be effective in controlling small insects and even some leaf diseases. If pests and diseases are a big problem, systemic rose care products can be of help.

    April

    A good spray of water in early morning can be effective in controlling small insects and even some leaf diseases. If pests and diseases are a big problem, systemic rose care products can be of help.

    May

    A good spray of water in early morning can be effective in controlling small insects and even some leaf diseases. If pests and diseases are a big problem, systemic rose care products can be of help.

    June

    A good spray of water in early morning can be effective in controlling small insects and even some leaf diseases. If pests and diseases are a big problem, systemic rose care products can be of help.

    July

    A good spray of water in early morning can be effective in controlling small insects and even some leaf diseases. If pests and diseases are a big problem, systemic rose care products can be of help.

    August

    A good spray of water in early morning can be effective in controlling small insects and even some leaf diseases. If pests and diseases are a big problem, systemic rose care products can be of help.

    September

    A good spray of water in early morning can be effective in controlling small insects and even some leaf diseases. If pests and diseases are a big problem, systemic rose care products can be of help.

    October

    A good spray of water in early morning can be effective in controlling small insects and even some leaf diseases. If pests and diseases are a big problem, systemic rose care products can be of help.

    Transplant

    When's the best time to dig up and transplant this from one spot to another? (This is different than planting). Any special requirements?

    January

    With care, established roses may be moved during bare-root season, before new growth appears.

    February

    With care, established roses may be moved during bare-root season, before new growth appears.

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