Finding Your Gardening Climate Zone

User Rating: / 28
PoorBest 

Finding Your Climate Zone is an Important Part of Using the Mulch - Let us Help You! (Click here for a tutorial on how to add it to your profile)

usda_hardiness_zones2.jpgThe plants that will grow best in your garden are the ones that are best-adaptable to your specific climate. That’s why it pays to know your climate zone. To identify your climate zone (and the plants recommended for it), we use the two most popular systems of climate zones in the USA, which are the USDA Hardiness Zones and the Sunset Climate Zones .
 
Although both systems are quite useful as a general guide to climate, they are different in their scope: the USDA Zones are based solely on average minimum temperatures, while the Sunset Zones take into account many different climate factors such as summer heat, duration of heat and cold, annual rainfall, humidity, and prevailing winds. Knowing your climate zone in both of these systems is essential to identifying which plants will grow well for you.
 
Please Take a Minute and Find Your Climate Zone (either Sunset, USDA or both) and add it to your Profile. It's better if you find your zone in both systems.  

Find Your Sunset Climate Zone (it's easy):

If you live in the West, please use the Sunset Climate Zones - the Western half of the country usually uses the Sunset Climate Zones, however it's now possible to use the Sunset system throughout the whole US. 

Step 1:  Refer to the Sunset Cimate Zone map and find your Sunset Climate Zone.

Step 2:  Add this information (it's a number between 1-42) to your registration or your profile (Click here for a tutorial on how to add it to your profile) so we can have an easy way to understand your gardening needs better.

Find Your USDA Hardiness Zone (it's easy):

Most of the Eastern half of the US uses the USDA Hardiness Zones .
 
Step 1: Use this handy Zone Finder to help you find your USDA Hardiness Zone (it's a number between 1-11).
 
Step 2: If Zone Finder (above) gives you multiple results you can use the USDA Hardiness Zone Map here to find your zone.

Step 3: Add this information to your registration or your profile (Click here for a tutorial on how to add it to your profile) we can have an easy way to understand your gardening needs better.
Trackback(0)
Comments (0)Add Comment

Write comment

busy
Related Articles/Posts

Live Website Help

Guests & Members

We have 1042 guests online