User Rating: 0 / 5

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive
 

Patrick Anderson's Top Plant Recommendation: Favorite Companion Plants for Succulent Gardens for Southern California.

Patrick Anderson

Echium fastuosum
Large, shrubby perennial with large spires of blue flowers in spring. Very tough and drought tolerant, it also reseeds and can naturalize in sunny areas. Watch it carefully; it grows quickly, and can shade out more valuable plants nearby.
Additional Details

Encelia farinosa
A California native subshrub with felted grey leaves and bright yellow daisy-like flowers in late spring. It will also naturalize, so be sure to remove unwanted seedlings when they appear in the wrong place.
Additional Details

Euphorbia rigida
A perennial eurphorbia that is very much at home among its succulent cousins. Its bright chartreuse bracts in late winter are a terrific complement to the reds & oranges of the aloes it accompanies. It self-sows readily, but not invasively.
Additional Details

Hunnemannia fumariifolia
One of my favorite annuals, this has feathery grey leaves and brilliant sulfur-yellow flowers through most of the spring and summer. It reseeds freely when it's happy in its surroundings, but unwanted seedlings (if there is such a thing) are easy to remove.
Additional Details

Romneya coulteri
By far the most beautiful native perennial, in my opinion. Tall stems (to 6 feet) shoot up in the spring, topped in June by huge crinkly white flowers with bright yellow centers - giving this plant its other common name, the fried-egg plant. It spreads by underground runners and can be aggressive, but I can't think of anything I would rather have take over the garden. It looks best if it is cut completely to the ground each summer.
Additional Details

Urginea maritima
This large (volleyball sized) bulb is from the Mediterranean region, so it is summer dormant. With winter rains come lush grey-green leaves, which die back by late spring. Then in late summer or fall, huge spikes (to 4 ft. or more) bearing thousands of tiny white flowers shoot up from the naked bulbs. The bulbs keep increasing in size with age, and eventually multiply into large clumps.
Additional Details

Jim Threadgill with Urginea maritima


Register
Remember Me
Forgot username  Forgot password

Upcoming Events